Education Law

1066 ABA Journal Education Law articles.

4th Circuit rules for school that nixed child’s essay on acceptance of transgender people
A federal appeals court has ruled for an elementary school that removed a 10-year-old girl's essay on acceptance of transgender people from an essay collection placed in the classroom and distributed to parents.
Group sues Yale over race-conscious admissions and seeks cert in Harvard suit
Students for Fair Admissions has filed a lawsuit challenging race-conscious admissions policies at Yale University less than a month after the U.S. Department of Justice dropped a bias suit that it filed against the school during the Trump administration.
Federal student loan repayment plan rules should be eased, says ABA House

A resolution calling on Congress and the White House to authorize the suspension or forgiveness of student loans and to make it easier to qualify for repayment plans was adopted…

‘I destroyed my life’: Former Willkie co-chair suspended for paying $75K to boost daughter’s ACT score
Gordon Caplan, the former co-chairman of Willkie Farr & Gallagher, has been suspended from law practice for two years for participating in the college admissions scandal.
Afternoon Briefs: Judge in ethics trouble for school dispute; lawyer sues ex-client who punched him

Panel recommends judge’s removal for school-dispute conduct

A judicial ethics panel has recommended removal of a judge in Union County, New Jersey, based on her conduct after her children’s Catholic…

Afternoon Briefs: DOJ drops suit over Yale admissions process; 7th Circuit allows courthouse Nativity scene

DOJ drops suit accusing Yale of bias against Asian, white applicants

The U.S. Department of Justice on Wednesday dropped a lawsuit accusing Yale University of racially discriminating against many Asian…

Afternoon Briefs: These SCOTUS justices skipped the inauguration; student loan deferments extended

3 SCOTUS justices didn’t attend the inaugurations of Biden and Harris

The U.S. Supreme Court’s three oldest justices did not attend President Joe Biden’s inauguration Wednesday: Stephen G. Breyer, 82;…

Supreme Court agrees to hear First Amendment case of suspended cheerleader
The U.S. Supreme Court on Friday agreed to decide whether a school district can punish students for off-campus speech.
School shooting survivors can’t sue county officials for failing to protect them, 11th Circuit rules
A federal appeals court ruled Friday that 15 survivors of a 2018 mass shooting at the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, can’t sue public officials for failing to protect them.
Afternoon Briefs: Prison contraband hidden in footballs; Kamala Harris’ husband gets teaching job

Sensing technology detects football contraband tossed into prison

Footballs and packages tossed into a Mississippi prison yard early Monday morning contained cellphones, marijuana, cigars and barbecue chicken wings. Officials at…

Afternoon Briefs: Student loan reprieve extended; did Giuliani infect state lawmakers?

One more month of student loan forbearance announced by Education Department

Student loan forbearance has been extended through Jan. 31, the U.S. Department of Education announced Friday. The offering started…

Trump administration officials appear to defy court orders, setting a bad precedent, prof says
Judges seem unprepared from the defiance of Trump administration officials who appear to have repeatedly defied court orders, according to a political science professor who researches judicial decision-making.
Pandemic problems may be defense for law schools not meeting bar passage standard
Law schools now must report the number of recent graduates admitted by diploma privilege in their annual questionnaires in addition to those who took and passed a bar exam.
1st Circuit upholds Harvard’s use of race in admissions; group will seek SCOTUS review
The 1st U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals at Boston on Thursday upheld Harvard University’s use of race in undergraduate admissions.
Federal judge rules students have no right to civics education while warning of peril to democracy

A Rhode Island federal judge has ruled students in the state have no constitutional right to a civics education, even as he warned of a “deep flaw” in education priorities. Judge William Smith said they seem to recognize “American democracy is in peril.”

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