ABA Journal

Education Law

1097 ABA Journal Education Law articles.

After being denied Title IV funds, Florida Coastal sues Education Department

Florida Coastal School of Law, which lost its federal financial aid in April, and by June had an approved teach-out plan with the ABA, sued the U.S. Department of Education on Tuesday, alleging the agency acted arbitrarily and capriciously, without due process, when it terminated the for-profit school’s participation in the loan program.

Federal judge refuses to block Indiana University’s vaccine mandate; incoming 1L is among the plaintiffs

A federal judge in South Bend, Indiana, has refused to block Indiana University’s COVID-19 vaccine requirement for faculty and students in an opinion that said the plaintiffs' 14th Amendment claim was unlikely to succeed.

SCOTUS in review: Kavanaugh is the median; Barrett, consensus justices play ‘the long game’

What are the takeaways from the most recent U.S. Supreme Court term? Several Supreme Court journalists are answering that question in stories that look at split decisions and consensus, the likely median justice and the justices most to the right.

State ban on tuition assistance at religion-teaching schools to be reviewed by Supreme Court

The U.S. Supreme Court on Friday agreed to consider the constitutionality of a Maine tuition assistance program that can’t be used at schools that teach religion.

Netflix’s ‘Operation Varsity Blues’ and the morality of parenthood

My son is weeks away from turning 3. Age 2 has been somewhat challenging, so I’m starting to believe all the horror stories friends have told my wife and me about “threenagers” and the difficulty they present.

SCOTUS lets stand victory by transgender man Gavin Grimm, former student who sued over bathroom policy

The U.S. Supreme Court has let stand a ruling that a Virginia school board violated the constitutional rights of Gavin Grimm, a transgender man and a former high school student, when it barred him from using the bathroom that matched his gender identity.

Cheerleader’s Snapchat vulgarity had a message, Supreme Court says in 8-1 ruling against school

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Wednesday that a Pennsylvania school district violated a cheerleader’s First Amendment rights when it suspended her from the squad for F-word Snapchat posts.

Supreme Court upholds some education benefits for NCAA athletes; will other limits fall?

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday unanimously agreed that colleges may pay some education-related benefits to college athletes despite NCAA rules to the contrary.

Afternoon Briefs: Hate speech mustn’t be normalized, ABA president says; Title IX protects gay and transgender students

ABA president: Hate speech legitimizes intolerance

ABA President Patricia Lee Refo said Tuesday the association is “deeply troubled” by recent hate speech directed at Jewish, LGBTQ, Asian American and Muslim…

Teach-out plan for Florida Coastal approved; classes will end after summer term

Following the U.S. Department of Education recently pulling federal financial aid at the Florida Coastal School of Law, a teach-out plan has been approved, with current students finishing courses at other ABA-approved law schools.

DOJ says it can defend religious exemption that allows LGBTQ discrimination in education

The U.S. Department of Justice is opposing an attempt by Christian colleges to intervene in a lawsuit by asserting that it can defend a religious exemption that allows the schools to discriminate against LGBTQ students.

ABA urges suspension or forgiveness of some student debt in letter to new chief of federal student aid office

The ABA is asking the Biden administration to take steps to relieve the burden of student loan debt, including by suspending or forgiving some of the debt. In a June 8 letter, ABA President Patricia Lee Refo said the association appreciates congressional efforts to resolve the problem.

ACLU is split by internal debate over First Amendment support for hate speech

The American Civil Liberties Union, long known for its support of the First Amendment, is dealing with internal dissension over defense of hate speech.

Stanford lifts graduation hold on law student who made satirical flyer for fake Federalist Society event

Third-year Stanford Law School student Nicholas Wallace was informed on the last day of classes that the school was placing a hold on his degree as it investigated a complaint about his satirical flyer promoting a fake insurrection event sponsored by the Federalist Society.

Lawyer described as ‘Don Quixote of student debt’ relief decides to run for Congress

A lawyer who has been pursuing relief for student borrowers in bankruptcy court has decided to run for Congress in 2022 on a platform that includes reforming rules for cancellation of such debt.

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