Entertainment & Sports Law

1024 ABA Journal Entertainment & Sports Law articles.

Lenny Dykstra’s reputation was so tarnished that he wasn’t defamed by book, judge rules
A New York judge has tossed a defamation lawsuit filed by Lenny Dykstra, ruling that the former baseball player’s reputation is so tarnished that he wasn’t injured by his former teammate’s bigotry claim.
Revenue sharing poses potential roadblock to Major League Baseball restarting, sports lawyers say

Baseball most naturally lends itself to implementing the types of social distancing measures recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention amid the COVID-19 pandemic. But sports lawyers say Major League Baseball likely has the most delicate off-the-field legal and contractual issues to iron out before the teams can play ball.

Studios that made ‘Criminal Minds’ are sued for alleged longtime sexual harassment on set
A California agency has filed a sexual harassment lawsuit alleging that the production companies that made the TV show Criminal Minds failed to prevent an alleged hostile work environment that persisted for 14 years.
Federal judge tosses unequal pay claims by US women’s soccer team, allows other claims
A federal judge in Los Angeles tossed pay-bias claims Friday by the U.S. women’s soccer team, finding that the women actually earned more on an average per-game basis than men.
Lawyers and Atlanta Opera team up to create covers for N95 masks for local hospital

“We put together this team of attorneys from Carlton Fields and Troutman Sanders to start looking at how we could protect the opera and allow us to mobilize to get as many of these masks produced as possible,” said Micah Forston, managing director of the Atlanta Opera.

Afternoon Briefs: Seyfarth withdraws after controversial filing; law firm scammer seeks release

Seyfarth Shaw withdraws from suit after controversial argument

Seyfarth Shaw is seeking to withdraw from representing the U.S. Soccer Federation in an equal-pay case after a controversial court filing.…

Afternoon Briefs: Athletes aim for law school; lawsuits target Zoom over Facebook sharing

Pro basketball players shoot for law school

Imani McGee-Stafford, a center with the Dallas Wings, is leaving the basketball court and headed to the Southwestern Law School in Los Angeles.…

Supreme Court rules suits for contracting bias must show but-for causation, a tougher standard

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday that lawsuits alleging discrimination in contracts under a Reconstruction-era law have to show but-for causation.

The Supreme Court ruled unanimously in the case…

Lawyer, author and founder of program for wrongfully convicted dies at 52
Laura Caldwell, a lawyer, author and founder of a project that supported the wrongfully convicted, died Sunday after a long battle with breast cancer.
New Orleans Saints apparently helped shape priest pedophile list, lawyers allege
The New Orleans Saints apparently had a hand in determining which local priests were on a pedophile list, according to lawyers for sex abuse plaintiffs suing the Archdiocese of New Orleans.
Afternoon Briefs: Judge and civil rights lawyer dies at 93; lawyer reminds court of Super Bowl continuance promise

Nathaniel Jones, civil rights lawyer and appeals judge, dies at 93

Former civil rights lawyer and federal appeals judge Nathaniel Jones died Sunday at age 93. Jones was on the…

Fair game: Does the fair use doctrine apply to Andy Warhol’s pop art?
The acclaimed “Andy Warhol—From A to B and Back Again” exhibit of more than 400 of Andy Warhol’s works has been making the rounds from New York to San Francisco to Chicago. Even casual observers have a sense of Warhol’s groundbreaking pop-art style. Yet there is one surprising legal question of fair use and transformative value that begs consideration: Just what is a “Warhol”?
Meet 11 ABA members who inspired us in 2019
Members Who Inspire is an ABA Journal series profiling exceptional ABA members. This past year, we featured many in the legal field who are doing good work and paying it forward, including pro bono for veterans, fighting for prisoners' rights, and promoting literacy and advancing diversity.
Fast track: A 4-time Olympian takes her luge experience to the classroom

Fear and luge are not compatible. Cameron Myler—a four-time Olympian who spent countless hours lying on her back on a tiny sled, feet stretched out in front of her, hurtling down an icy track without brakes—would know. “Luge is not a good sport if you are afraid,” says Myler, a co-vice-chair of the ABA Business Law Section’s Sports Law Committee.

Can ‘SNL’ star Pete Davidson really collect $1M from fans who violate his nondisclosure agreement?
Saturday Night Live comedian Pete Davidson may scare fans into keeping quiet with a $1 million nondisclosure agreement, but it’s unlikely he will be able to enforce the contract in court, legal experts say.

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