ABA Journal

Europe

1327 ABA Journal Europe articles.

How to apply business principles and legal tech to provide humanitarian aid to Ukraine

Ari Kaplan recently spoke with Jeroen Plink, the chief operating officer of the Legaltech Hub, a board member at Casetext and the former CEO of Practical Law; and Jeroen Ketting, the founder and CEO of the Lighthouse Group, a provider of management and trade support to Western companies doing business in Russia and Ukraine.

SCOTUS rules for US citizen who says return of her child to Italy poses grave risk of harm

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Wednesday that U.S. courts can refuse to return children to their home countries in situations posing a grave risk of harm without considering all measures that could reduce the risk.

Uniting for Ukraine draws criticism and praise from resettlement groups

Although some resettlement groups have welcomed President Joe Biden’s streamlined humanitarian parole program for Ukrainians fleeing the war, the initiative also has sparked frustration and claims that other at-risk people are not being offered the same protections.

Russian disinformation campaigns threaten trust in the court system, panelists say

Public confidence in the courts is at risk because of Russian disinformation campaigns, panelists said at a symposium at the National Judicial College on Thursday.

Another BigLaw firm adopts a menopause policy

Linklaters is the latest BigLaw firm in the United Kingdom to adopt a policy that provides resources and education regarding menopause.

How and why Kazakhstan gave up its Soviet-era nuclear weapons

When the Soviet Union dissolved and Kazakhstan became a sovereign state, it now had a conundrum: Should the country retain the nuclear weapons and become the world’s fourth largest nuclear power or relinquish them in return for international commitments?

Refugee lawyer describes harrowing invasion of Ukraine

A Ukrainian lawyer described the harrowing scenes she witnessed after the Russian invasion, telling an ABA panel on April 7 that she was forced to flee her country with her three young children and leave behind her husband.

Top UN court sees no evidence to support Russia’s claim of Ukrainian genocide, orders halt to invasion

The United Nations’ top court on Wednesday told Russia to halt military operations in Ukraine in interim “provisional measures” that are issued before a case is formally heard.

Law firms scramble to keep pace with unprecedented Russian sanctions

Ever since the U.S. imposed sanctions on Russia, attorney Adam M. Smith’s phone has been ringing off the hook. Smith is in demand. As sanctions pile up around the world in response to Russia’s unprovoked invasion of Ukraine, he is also thinking on his feet.

Russia is no-show at international court hearing on Ukraine invasion

Russia has declined to participate in a hearing before the International Court of Justice on its invasion of Russia.

Ukraine asks international courts to rule against Russia for its ‘brutal invasion,’ with one quick success

Updated: The European Court of Human Rights has quickly issued an interim decision against Russia, while another international court is also considering action after Ukraine complained of a "full-scale, brutal invasion."

3 BigLaw firms close their Kyiv offices; firms in US ready for pro bono refugee work

Baker McKenzie, Dentons and CMS have closed their offices in the Ukrainian capital of Kyiv until further notice, spokespeople said Thursday.

Ropes & Gray is accused of ‘unrelenting’ workload that caused UK barrister’s meltdown at work

A London barrister has sued Ropes & Gray for an alleged “unrelenting” workload that left her unable to continue with her career.

ABA observers will share their takeaways from the UN climate change conference in Glasgow

Next week, ABA members who attended and observed COP26 in Glasgow, Scotland, will share their takeaways from the annual summit and ideas for how others can get involved.

Poland is fined nearly $1.2M per day in battle with EU over judicial independence

The European Court of Justice on Wednesday fined Poland nearly $1.2 million per day because of the country’s refusal to abolish a judicial disciplinary body viewed as a tool to pressure judges to rule in accord with government views.

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