Features

658 ABA Journal Features articles.

Corporate lawyers can help clients change the world—and bill for it—with this growing practice area
Meet the groups helping to get women elected

Rebecca Dallet took her first seat on the bench during a mock trial in her high school government class. She spent the morning next to the judge, watching him and the impact he had on people who appeared before him.

Law Day 2020: Your Vote, Your Voice, Our Democracy

ABA President Judy Perry Martinez characterizes the 19th Amendment as the cornerstone of engagement for all women in our democracy.

50 ways to market your practice

For lawyers, marketing is a vital part of business, but it can be tricky, overwhelming and even intimidating. So we asked lawyers, legal professionals, marketers, consultants and other experts for 50 ways lawyers can stand out.

Cure or Con? Health products touted on social media are slipping by regulators

Social media offers cheap and targeted advertising that regulators don’t have the time or resources to fully monitor. Deceptive health claims that would land a company in court if made on television or radio are slipping by online.

2020 Legal Rebels: It takes a team

Beginning with the 2020 class, we decided to move Legal Rebels to February-March. To mark this new beginning for Legal Rebels, we decided to try something new. Whereas prior classes have mostly featured individuals with the occasional team thrown in, we decided that 2020’s class would be made up entirely of teams.

No Country for Rural Lawyers: Small-town attorneys still find it hard to thrive

Solving the rural attorney shortage won’t be easy, given that few law graduates appear willing to set up shop in rural America. The situation is only expected to worsen in the near future, given that many lawyers in less-populated counties are approaching retirement age and no younger attorneys have moved in to replace them.

Genealogy sites give law enforcement a new DNA sleuthing tool, but the battle over privacy looms

While law enforcement and the public largely welcome the new wave of forensic genealogy, others worry that privacy rights are being eroded by an investigative approach with little regulatory oversight.

Political unrest, violence have forced millions to migrate and seek protection of the rule of law

When countries lack the capacity to stop violence and corruption, and their legal and law enforcement systems lack the ability to hold perpetrators responsible, their people often have no other choice but to seek protection elsewhere.

Lawyers are unleashing a flurry of lawsuits to step up the fight against climate change

Traditionally relegated to the statutory realm of environmental and administrative law, a cadre of attorneys and legal scholars has given the climate change issue a creative facelift that may change the legal landscape—and, they say, could determine the fate of humanity.

Inside the Legal Profession: What the industry looks like in 2019

Law remains an in-demand profession that continues to grow and pay well while making slow, but steady progress when it comes to issues like diversity, technology adoption and employment after graduation from law school.

What lawyers earn in 2019

In the decade since the Great Recession, wages for private lawyers have risen, with the average salary now at $144,230. However, digging deeper into a collection of data released in the last year-and-a-half shows the wealth is not being shared equally across gender, region, client type and practice areas.

The best places to practice in 2019

Should you choose a state that’s already home to tons of attorneys? Or one that costs very little to buy a home? Or maybe in a state that boasts a high concentration of legal jobs?

Meet the 2019 Legal Rebels

When the ABA Journal named the first class of Legal Rebels 10 years ago, the legal industry was undergoing rapid transformation. Ten years later, it’s clear that many of the same issues that drove the original class of Legal Rebels to look for solutions outside the mainstream are still prevalent.

Formerly incarcerated people are building their own businesses and giving others second chances

Formerly incarcerated people have a difficult time separating themselves from their criminal histories, which makes getting jobs a struggle. Even when they’re eligible to get their records sealed or expunged, most don’t go through the process because they are either unaware of how to do it or lack the legal help they need to get it done.

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