Features

672 ABA Journal Features articles.

Urge to merge: Difficult times for law schools have prompted several to attempt to be acquired by other schools

In the past three years, seven law schools announced plans to partner, gift or sell themselves to universities—all but begging the question: Why would anyone want them?

Lawyers, songs and money: Music that changed the law

Some songs or albums move the law. A band or artist will be involved in a lawsuit so groundbreaking and important that it will set a precedent, either enshrined in law or otherwise binding future generations.

Law, Camera, Action! Attorneys with side gigs as TV commentators are always on call

Lawyers draw from their expertise to explain the law to a wider audience. But whether they appear on cable news or local morning shows, the demands of the format take a leading role.

Change Agents: A new wave of reform prosecutors upends the status quo

Because so many decisions are made outside of the public eye, the prosecutor’s office is often referred to as the “black box” of America’s criminal justice system. But a wave of new reformers are intent on letting in the light—through transparency, community engagement, and most important, regime change.

ABA offers opportunities and resources to address collateral consequences

Expungement and sealing of records will help people with criminal records move forward with their lives, says Lucian Dervan, chair of the ABA Criminal Justice Section.

Facebook plans to create a judicial-like body to address controversial speech

An independent body would hear appeals of content decisions by Facebook, either removing or leaving up posts, and its decisions would be binding.

Chicago nonprofit helps formerly incarcerated people find work and self-worth

Cara Chicago, a nonprofit that provides job readiness training to formerly incarcerated people, helps build their confidence.

Ending mass incarceration won’t succeed without giving people a second chance

While the United States has consistently put more people in prison than any other country, it has come up short in helping rebuild their lives once they’re released. More than 600,000 people leave the nation’s prisons every year with little more than a bus ticket and 50 bucks. Within five years, more than half of former state inmates are back inside.

Whose Court Is This Anyway? Immigration judges accuse executive branch of politicizing their courts

Immigration judges are concerned that the Trump administration has moved from reprioritizing cases to deliberately trying to affect case outcomes through unilateral changes to case law, pressure on judges to rule faster and even allegedly considering political affiliation in hiring judges.

Catch and Kill: Can tabloids hide behind the First Amendment?

Buying a story specifically to suppress it is known in the tabloid world as “catch and kill.” Should it be protected action under the First Amendment?

Law Day 2019: Free speech, free press, free society

May 1, 2019, will mark the 61st anniversary of Law Day, which is held every year as a celebration of the rule of law in our society. A planning guide features tips for organizing an effective Law Day event.

Social Clashes: Digital free speech is a hot legal battleground

Social media litigation raises serious concerns about the future of free speech, including attempts at censorship by government actors critical of comments on social media, the shifting standards of private platforms to censor online expression and the rise of hate and extremist speech in the digital world.

Leading LPM software providers differ over allowing 3rd-party integrations, even as firms and lawyers demand it

Competition among law practice management software providers is heating up while law firms are looking to make their operations more efficient. Firms must assess how LPM software integrates with other tech and fits their plans for cloud computing, mobile and social applications, and the use of big data and artificial intelligence—even blockchain.

Bullying from the Bench: A wave of high-profile bad behavior has put scrutiny on judges

Across the country, judges are creating embarrassing headlines when they are accused of abusive behavior toward lawyers and litigants.

Some law schools offer tech programs to help students find jobs, but does it work?

Recent law school graduates and attorneys with hiring responsibilities say that there are few tech jobs for new lawyers, largely because the profession isn’t ready for this new cadre of tech-savvy grads.

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