ABA Journal

Federal Government

2977 ABA Journal Federal Government articles.

Aug. 15, 1876: Congress passes the ‘Sell or Starve’ Act

Despite their historic victory at Little Bighorn in June 1876, the Sioux found little relief from the white onslaught. Accepting defeat, they returned to their reservations—unarmed and newly dependent on government rations. And on Aug. 15, 1876, Congress passed legislation that became known as the “Sell or Starve” Act, halting any aid to the Sioux until they relinquished both their hunting rights and their claim to the Black Hills.

US sells one-of-a-kind Wu-Tang Clan album to satisfy forfeiture judgment of ‘Pharma Bro’

Federal prosecutors in New York have sold a one-of-a-kind Wu-Tang Clan album to help satisfy a forfeiture judgment against “Pharma Bro” Martin Shkreli, a former drug company CEO convicted of securities fraud.

DOJ won’t defend congressman accused of helping incite US Capitol riot

The U.S. Department of Justice is refusing to represent a Republican lawmaker accused in a lawsuit of helping incite the U.S. Capitol riot in a speech that he gave Jan. 6.

Guatemalan lawyer travels to remote areas, sometimes by foot, to help reunite separated families

Guatemalan human rights lawyer Eriberto Pop travels by car, motorcycle and foot to find parents separated from their children in the United States and deported without them under a controversial Trump administration program that has since been rescinded.

Biden’s initial US attorney picks include historic firsts

President Joe Biden and his administration on Monday nominated eight lawyers to lead U.S. attorney’s offices, most of whom would be the first Black or female prosecutors to lead their districts.

CDC had no authority to impose nationwide eviction moratorium, 6th Circuit rules

A federal appeals court on Friday ruled against the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in a challenge to a moratorium that it imposed to help control the spread of COVID-19.

Afternoon Briefs: 7 federal death penalty requests withdrawn; ex-lawyer sentenced for advice on supplements

DOJ withdraws death penalty requests

The U.S. Department of Justice has withdrawn requests for the death penalty in seven cases, reversing the stance taken by the department during the Trump…

Democratic senators want to know more about over 4,500 Kavanaugh tips collected by FBI

Seven Democratic senators on the Senate Judiciary Committee want to know more about an FBI tip line that collected more than 4,500 phone calls and electronic submissions on U.S. Supreme Court Justice Brett M. Kavanaugh during the nomination process.

After being denied Title IV funds, Florida Coastal sues Education Department

Florida Coastal School of Law, which lost its federal financial aid in April, and by June had an approved teach-out plan with the ABA, sued the U.S. Department of Education on Tuesday, alleging the agency acted arbitrarily and capriciously, without due process, when it terminated the for-profit school’s participation in the loan program.

Chicago’s lakefront is an accident of history, but can it teach us how to preserve land for public use?

Chicago's lakefront, with its parks, museums, beaches and public spaces, is an accident of history. But can we take lessons from that history to create sustainable and environmentally responsible public spaces?

Afternoon Briefs: Husch Blackwell merges with boutique firm; man sentenced for threat to Flynn judge

Husch Blackwell will merge with boutique firm

Husch Blackwell has announced a merger with a health law boutique that represents hospitals and health care systems in the Boston area. The…

Why a federal judge ruled against the DACA program protecting some immigrants from deportation

President Joe Biden said Saturday the U.S. Department of Justice will appeal a judge’s determination that the Obama administration exceeded its authority when it moved to protect immigrants brought to the country illegally as children.

Afternoon Briefs: LSC could see $600M in 2022 funding; Netflix’s ‘Tiger King’ to receive shorter prison sentence

Legal Services Corp. could receive largest funding increase under new legislation

The House of Representatives Committee on Appropriations approved on Thursday funding legislation that includes $600 million for the Legal…

Garland restores discretion to immigration judges in ‘administrative closure’ decision

Attorney General Merrick Garland has overturned a Trump administration decision that prohibited immigration courts from using a practice known as “administrative closure” to temporarily pause removal proceedings.

11th Circuit upholds CDC freeze on evictions due to COVID-19

A landlord’s inability to evict delinquent tenants during the COVID-19 pandemic does not constitute an irreparable injury, a federal appeals court has ruled.

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