Human Rights

329 ABA Journal Human Rights articles.

Structural racism is killing us—now what? Here are some policy recommendations

On Dec. 9 and 10, the ABA Section of Civil Rights and Social Justice Rights of Immigrants Committee hosted a two-day policy summit exploring some of the most pressing civil rights issues confronting our nation.

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This past year, we've covered a wide array of in-depth, diverse and hard-hitting legal topics at the ABA Journal.
Afternoon Briefs: 2 death-row inmates test positive for COVID-19; US attorney in Missouri will resign

2 federal inmates test positive for COVID-19 ahead of January executions

Cory Johnson and Dustin John Higgs, two federal prisoners who are scheduled to be executed on Jan. 14 and…

Persecuted and marginalized: Black LGBTQ immigrants face unique challenges

About eight weeks after the first COVID-19 diagnosis in the U.S., the Department of Homeland Security shut down all immigration ports of entry to nonessential travel, including immigrants arriving to the southern border seeking asylum. But even as the border closure put a halt to the flow of people trying to enter the country, it created new challenges for immigration lawyer Tsion Gurmu.

Can businesses require employees to get a COVID-19 vaccine?
Employment lawyers are beginning to field questions from employers about whether they can require workers to be vaccinated for COVID-19.
Afternoon Briefs: 25 former DC bar leaders decry election suits; ousted 1L presses due process claim

25 ex-DC bar leaders decry election suits

Twenty-five former presidents of the District of Columbia Bar are criticizing lawyers who attacked the electoral process through unfounded allegations of voter fraud…

Lawyer is awarded $1 in attorney fees, matching jury award in case of snatched pen
Civil rights lawyer Jeffrey Rothman’s lawsuit against the city of New York and two police officers wasn’t a total loss.
On World AIDS Day, 9 organizations receive HIV Legal Services Fund grants
The ABA’s HIV/AIDS Impact Project announced Tuesday, on World AIDS Day, that nine organizations will receive grants of up to $150,000 each to improve the availability of HIV legal services in underserved areas across the country.
En banc 5th Circuit allows Medicaid defunding of Planned Parenthood
Medicaid patients don’t have a right to sue over a state’s decision to end Medicaid funding for Planned Parenthood, the en banc 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals at New Orleans ruled Monday.
1st Circuit upholds Harvard’s use of race in admissions; group will seek SCOTUS review
The 1st U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals at Boston on Thursday upheld Harvard University’s use of race in undergraduate admissions.
Conference brings together panelists to discuss ensuring a better tomorrow for all
In the wake of the 2020 U.S. presidential election, the ABA Section of Civil Rights and Social Justice Rights of Immigrants Committee, in strategic partnership with the German Marshall Fund of the United States, is hosting a policy summit designed to advance racial equity and social justice principles.
Afternoon Briefs: Latham will pay fall bonuses; Reagan shooter may display artwork, judge rules

Latham will pay fall bonuses, donate $1M to fight hunger

Latham & Watkins has announced that it will pay fall bonuses ranging from $7,500 to $40,000—the market scale for law…

Chemerinsky: SCOTUS considers whether religious freedom also means freedom to discriminate
On Nov. 4, the U.S. Supreme Court again will face one of the country’s most divisive constitutional issues: Does the First Amendment’s protection of speech and religion provide a basis for violating laws that prohibit discrimination against gays and lesbians?
University of Chicago Law School celebrates Earl Dickerson’s legacy as a civil rights lawyer and activist

Earl B. Dickerson’s name may not be well known to the public, but the civil rights lawyer lived a larger-than-life existence. Now, scholars, relatives and activists are marking the 100th anniversary of his 1920 graduation from the University of Chicago Law School in celebration of his becoming the first African American to receive a juris doctor.

Former Davis Polk associate may pursue retaliation claim, judge says; other racial bias claims tossed
A federal judge in Manhattan has ruled that a Black former associate at Davis Polk & Wardwell can pursue a retaliation claim against three partners, but many of his other racial bias claims were inadequate.

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