ABA Journal

Human Rights

434 ABA Journal Human Rights articles.

Supreme Court considers Title VII accommodation for Christian postal worker who wouldn’t work on Sundays

The U.S. Supreme Court agreed Friday to decide the case of a Christian postal worker who quit his job after he was disciplined for refusing to work on Sundays for religious reasons.

Berkeley Law dean thinks school is on ‘strong legal ground’ after student groups ban Zionist speakers

Erwin Chemerinsky, the dean of the University of California at Berkeley School of Law, said he will cooperate in an investigation spurred by a ban on Zionist speakers by several student groups.

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Is designer’s refusal to create website for same-sex wedding free speech or illegal discrimination?

The case of 303 Creative v. Elenis is about whether the Colorado Anti-Discrimination Act violates the First Amendment free speech rights of Lorie Smith and her wholly owned design firm.

Chemerinsky: An important week of arguments in the Supreme Court

Next Monday and Wednesday, the Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in two of the most important cases of the term. Each could have enormous implications for future litigation and for constitutional law.

Lawyers struggle to make headway with growing immigrant backlog

The virtual courtroom of immigration Judge Thomas Mulligan of New York City’s Varick Street court was not exactly a well-oiled machine on a recent August morning. The judge was occupied with master calendar hearings, the docket where respondents—they would be called “defendants” in other settings—acknowledged and answered the government’s charges.

Ex-lawyer sentenced for Molotov cocktail toss; she’s ‘a remarkable person who did a terrible thing,’ judge says

A disbarred tenants lawyer was sentenced Friday to 15 months in prison for tossing a Molotov cocktail into an unoccupied police car during May 2020 racial justice demonstrations in New York.

‘By Hands Now Known’ shines light on cold cases of lynchings and racial violence

In summer 2020, when the murder of George Floyd was igniting protests, it occurred to Margaret A. Burnham that “George Floyd” was a common-sounding name. She went into her archive of Jim Crow-era homicides and found another George Floyd.

Texas governor invokes obscure constitutional provision to repel ‘border invasion;’ judge strikes down Title 42 next day

Republican Texas Gov. Greg Abbott said Monday he is invoking the U.S. Constitution’s invasion clause and taking “unprecedented measures” to repel a “border invasion.”

Last-minute election lawsuits target absentee ballots; Florida clashes with DOJ over monitors

Election litigation was heating up in battleground states as voters went to the polls Tuesday. Lawsuits were filed over undated absentee ballots in Pennsylvania, unmailed absentee ballots in Georgia, and plans to hand count ballots in Arizona and Nevada.

Estimated 4.6M Americans can’t vote in midterms because of felony convictions, new report says

The estimated number of people who can’t vote in the United States because of a felony conviction has declined by 24% since 2016, but the total is still large, according to a report released Tuesday by the Sentencing Project.

Ex-EEOC lawyer is making ‘highly questionable’ assertion about abortion travel benefits, Littler Mendelson says

The former general counsel of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission is “misleading and intimidating” employers who provide travel benefits for women traveling to obtain abortions, according to a letter by Littler Mendelson’s Workplace Policy Institute, the law firm’s government affairs arm.

Dechert was ‘willfully blind’ to partner accused of conspiring to hack opponent’s emails, RICO suit says

A civil racketeering lawsuit filed Thursday accuses Dechert of turning a blind eye to alleged unethical conduct by a London partner who allegedly conspired to hack and release the emails of a client’s opponent.

Justice Jackson, other liberal SCOTUS justices appeared determined ‘to go down swinging’ in voting-maps case

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Elena Kagan called a challenge to Alabama’s congressional voting maps a “slam dunk” during oral arguments Tuesday, even as the conservative justices on the high court appeared to be searching for a narrow way to uphold them.

Weekly Briefs: SCOTUS justice’s wife stands by stolen-election views; district attorney’s daughter arrested in his stabbing

Ginni Thomas tells Jan. 6 committee about her stolen-election views

Conservative activist Virginia “Ginni” Thomas told the House committee investigating the Jan. 6, 2021, U.S. Capitol attack that she…

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