ABA Journal

Human Rights

371 ABA Journal Human Rights articles.

Family of Henrietta Lacks sues for nonconsensual use of her tissue sample and cell line

The estate of Henrietta Lacks has filed a lawsuit alleging that a biotechnology company is profiting from the unauthorized use of living tissue taken from the Black woman without her consent or knowledge in a 1951 operation for her cervical cancer.

University of Montana faces Title IX complaints, including from law students

Following a Title IX lawsuit brought by former administrators and a current professor at the University of Montana, law students at the school claim they were dissuaded from filing administrative complaints alleging repeated use of slurs in the classroom and sexual misconduct.

Chemerinsky: Expect a truly extraordinary year at the Supreme Court

Every Supreme Court term has important decisions that change the law and affect people’s lives, but some years are blockbusters in the number of high-profile, significant rulings. The October 2021 term, which begins on Monday, Oct. 4, promises to be such a year. It is the first full term with the court’s current composition.

Guilty verdict in terrorism trial for hotelier of ‘Hotel Rwanda’ fame is unfair, ABA center says

“This was a show trial rather than a fair judicial inquiry,” Geoffrey Robertson of the the Clooney Foundation for Justice’s TrialWatch said in a press release. Robinson wrote a report on the trial with the ABA Center for Human Rights staff in June.

Advocating for human rights for workers around the world is part of the ABA’s mission

Next time you put on that top fashion-brand garment made in Bangladesh, consider the workers who produced it. Are they still alive, despite wages below poverty level and unsafe…

Lawsuits challenging new voting restrictions in Texas cite these constitutional protections

A new voter fraud law in Texas is being challenged in at least five lawsuits contending that the law unconstitutionally burdens the right to vote and violates the Voting Rights Act.

SCOTUS formally rejects request to block Texas abortion ban

The U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday officially denied an emergency request from abortion providers to block a controversial Texas law that bans abortions after six weeks, before many women know that they are pregnant.

Republican-led states sue Biden administration over protections for transgender students and workers

Twenty Republican-led states sued the Biden administration Monday claiming that protections for transgender people, including access to bathrooms and locker rooms, are invalid under federal law.

Texas’ 6-week abortion ban takes effect with no Supreme Court intervention

The U.S. Supreme Court failed to take action on an emergency application to block Texas’ near-total ban on abortions, allowing the most restrictive abortion law in the country to go into effect Wednesday.

Abortion providers ask Supreme Court to block Texas heartbeat law from taking effect

Abortion providers asked the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday to intervene after a federal appeals court over the weekend had stymied their attempts to stop a far-reaching Texas abortion law from going into effect.

Human rights violations at American Indian boarding schools must be investigated, ABA House says

The ABA House of Delegates voted Monday in favor of a resolution calling for an investigation into human rights abuses at American Indian boarding schools after the president of the Canadian Bar Association appeared in person to support the resolution.

ABA House votes to oppose laws that ban transgender student athletes

The House of Delegates weighed in on the ongoing national debate over transgender youth and sports at the ABA Hybrid Annual Meeting on Monday.

ABA Hybrid Annual Meeting convenes members online and in Chicago

The American Bar Association is hosting its first-ever hybrid annual meeting, which will bring together members for both virtual and in-person events in Chicago this week.

The ABA has advocated for people with HIV/AIDS for more than 30 years

While the American Bar Association has mobilized to help the public and profession during the COVID-19 pandemic, this is not the first time the association has addressed the challenge of a new and deadly virus. At the height of the United States’ AIDS epidemic, the ABA helped lead the charge to decrease discrimination against people who were infected with HIV.

Aug. 15, 1876: Congress passes the ‘Sell or Starve’ Act

Despite their historic victory at Little Bighorn in June 1876, the Sioux found little relief from the white onslaught. Accepting defeat, they returned to their reservations—unarmed and newly dependent on government rations. And on Aug. 15, 1876, Congress passed legislation that became known as the “Sell or Starve” Act, halting any aid to the Sioux until they relinquished both their hunting rights and their claim to the Black Hills.

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