ABA Journal

Immigration Law

1387 ABA Journal Immigration Law articles.

5 tips for working with clients who stand in their own way

Recently, I had an immigration case, where my client was tardy on every deadline and patently refused to do anything beyond the bare minimum to aid their cause. I was emotionally drained by the case but buoyed by the positive result at the end. I must admit I couldn’t fight the impulse to remind the client that they had stood in the way of their own success.

DOJ lifts Trump-era case quotas for immigration judges

Immigration judges will no longer be required to close 700 cases per year to get a “satisfactory” rating.

ABA Giving Day is an opportunity ‘to help ensure a just society,’ says ABA president

For the second year, the ABA is asking members to join in its efforts to address significant issues that affect their communities.

ABA Commission on Immigration offers students ‘hands-on’ experience with people in detention

“A lot of people frequent the hotline, so you build a relationship with these callers who are really trying their best to understand the process,” says Emma Yznaga, who was an intern with the ABA Commission on Immigration’s Detention and Legal Orientation Program Information Line for four months.

California’s ban on private prisons unconstitutionally interferes with immigration enforcement, 9th Circuit rules

A federal appeals court has ruled that a ban on private prisons in California unconstitutionally restricts the federal government’s authority to operate private detention facilities in the state.

Want to help Haitian immigrants? ABA is looking to train pro bono volunteers

The ABA is offering a new opportunity to members who want to help immigrants who have fled Haiti because of ongoing political strife and devastating natural disasters.

Proposed rule is intended to preserve DACA program protecting some immigrants from deportation

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security on Monday announced a proposed rule to “preserve and fortify” the program that protects immigrants brought to the country illegally as children from deportation.

For immigration law, a perfect storm creates challenges and opportunities for firms

Three key developments are driving a dramatic increase in U.S. immigration activity in 2021. As a result, immigration law firms are bracing for a huge influx of cases. In this rapidly evolving practice area, technology and process automation are increasingly important for immigration attorneys seeking to meet the challenge.

Supreme Court doesn’t disturb order forcing Biden to revive remain-in-Mexico policy

The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday kept in place a judge’s order requiring reinstatement of a Trump administration policy requiring asylum-seekers to remain in Mexico while their cases are pending.

SCOTUS justices pause reinstatement of remain-in-Mexico policy, won’t stop Obama center construction

Supreme Court justices on Friday acted on two requests to block court rulings on immigration and construction of a presidential center that is opposed by environmentalists.

Asylum officers, rather than immigration judges, would decide border asylum cases under proposed rule

Asylum officers would hear and decide asylum claims at the border under a proposed rule announced by the Biden administration Wednesday.

Federal law doesn’t preempt New Jersey’s ban on immigration cooperation, 3rd Circuit rules

A federal appeals court has upheld a New Jersey directive that limited state and local law enforcement cooperation with federal immigration authorities.

ACLU intends to pursue suit after Biden administration continues expelling those arriving illegally

Plaintiffs who challenged a Trump administration policy to expel people entering the country illegally have said they plan to continue pursuing their lawsuit after reaching an impasse in negotiations with the Biden administration.

Guatemalan lawyer travels to remote areas, sometimes by foot, to help reunite separated families

Guatemalan human rights lawyer Eriberto Pop travels by car, motorcycle and foot to find parents separated from their children in the United States and deported without them under a controversial Trump administration program that has since been rescinded.

How one bankruptcy software company had a banner year despite filings hitting a low

When COVID-19 began hitting the United States hard last year, Janine Sickmeyer was among those in the bankruptcy world who thought that there would be a tsunami of cases. But contrary to the prognostications of many, the influx never materialized.

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