Immigration Law

1279 ABA Journal Immigration Law articles.

Chinese dissident can sue law firm over hack that exposed information online, judge rules
A federal judge in Washington, D.C., has ruled that a Chinese asylum-seeker can sue the Clark Hill law firm over a 2017 hack that allegedly exposed personal data online.
Afternoon Briefs: Sotomayor sees ‘pall of uncertainty’ in capital case; judge backs park proselytizing

Death-row inmate’s conviction has ‘pall of uncertainty,’ Sotomayor says

Justice Sonia Sotomayor expressed concern on Monday about a “pall of uncertainty” over the conviction of Texas death-row inmate Rodney Reed.

Sotomayor questions quick decisions when the US wants to lift injunctions
Justice Sonia Sotomayor questioned the Supreme Court’s hurry to lift injunctions when she dissented from a decision Friday evening allowing implementation of a new federal rule in Illinois that will bar more poor immigrants from the United States.
Afternoon Briefs: Texas university leader leaves without blame for law school scandal; judge sides with immigrants

Texas Southern University president leaves school with no blame for alleged law school misconduct

Texas Southern University is parting ways with its president without any claims of wrongdoing, which is…

Asylum-seekers deserve greater legal protections and better treatment, declares ABA House
The federal government should maintain an asylum system that provides those fleeing persecution or torture with access to counsel, due process and full and fair adjudication rights that are consistent with U.S. and international law, according to a resolution the ABA House of Delegates passed overwhelmingly Monday at the midyear meeting in Austin, Texas.
‘The personal attacks on our judges and prosecutors must cease,’ says ABA president
ABA President Judy Perry Martinez reminded the House of Delegates at the 2020 ABA Midyear Meeting in Austin, Texas, on Monday that Americans of all different backgrounds are paying more attention to issues of justice.
The 2020 ABA Midyear Meeting kicks off in Texas
The 2020 ABA Midyear Meeting opens in the Lone Star State this week, providing ABA members the opportunity to attend hundreds of legal programs and events; hear from recognized law experts; and meet with colleagues in their sections, divisions, committees and councils.
Afternoon Briefs: AG Barr will consider Giuliani’s Ukraine evidence; Trump praises drug dealer death penalty

AG Barr will consider Giuliani evidence from Ukraine

U.S. Attorney General William Barr said Monday he will consider information from Ukraine provided by lawyer Rudy Giuliani. Barr cautioned that there…

Afternoon Briefs: SCOTUS lacks State of the Union majority; judge reverses No More Deaths convictions

Which Supreme Court justices attended the State of the Union?

Only four justices attended the State of the Union on Tuesday. Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. was there, even…

Afternoon Briefs: Utah allows bar admission for DACA immigrants; first openly gay federal judge dies

Utah allows bar admission for DACA immigrants

The Utah Supreme Court has approved a new rule that allows immigrants brought to the country illegally as children to gain admission to…

Afternoon Briefs: Former BigLaw lawyer drops suit; judge resigns amid hostile-environment probe

Former Ogletree Deakins shareholder drops bias claim

A former nonequity partner at Ogletree Deakins, Dawn Knepper, has dropped her bias lawsuit against the firm. The notice of the dropped claims…

ABA president calls for creation of independent immigration courts, criticizes ‘remain in Mexico’ policy
ABA President Judy Perry Martinez told a House subcommittee Wednesday that she has firsthand experience with the problems facing immigration courts and the people who appear there.
Immigration judges are leaving because the job is ‘unbearable,’ union says

Dozens of immigration judges have left or retired because of concerns about judicial independence. The job has become “unbearable,” according to A. Ashley Tabaddor, president of the National Association of Immigration Judges.

Supreme Court allows US to implement rule curbing green cards based on likely public assistance
The U.S. Supreme Court allowed on Monday the implementation of the “public charge” rule that makes it easier for the government to deny visas and green cards to immigrants who receive or are likely to receive public assistance.
Judge calls ICE if he thinks defendants in his courtroom are in US illegally
A Cincinnati judge said he regularly calls U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement when he suspects that defendants in his courtroom are in the country illegally.

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