ABA Journal

Injury & Accident Law

1325 ABA Journal Injury & Accident Law articles.

Laws are needed to prevent crowd crush disasters like Astroworld, expert says

Astroworld 2021 was one of the deadliest concerts in U.S. history. In all, 10 people in the audience died from injuries they sustained in the pressure-packed crowd that night. The youngest was a 9-year-old boy. According to the Harris County Institute of Forensic Sciences, they all died from compression asphyxia when the pressure of the crowd against their chests prevented them from breathing.

Supreme Court should decide Camp LeJeune case and fix Feres doctrine ‘chaos,’ Thomas argues

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas argued Monday that the Supreme Court should have decided an appeal filed by the widow of a service member who died from leukemia after his alleged exposure to toxins and contaminated water at Camp LeJeune.

Mighty Big Fight: Tech company that services PI lawyers sets up law firm to compete with them

Since 2018, Mighty has provided personal injury lien management software to attorney financiers and medical providers. In 2020, it began offering the same tech to lawyers and law firms.

Lawyer pleads guilty in staged accident scheme; victims underwent unnecessary surgery

A New York lawyer has pleaded guilty to wire fraud for participating in a scheme involving phony trip-and-fall accidents and fraudulent lawsuits.

How do you calculate damages in injury trials? Longtime expert witness reveals methodology

Estimating what the future would have looked like if an accident had never occurred can seem more like a thought experiment than a scientific process. But there’s a science behind it, says Michael Shahnasarian.

How lawyers can unlock the potential of the metaverse

The metaverse is all the rage these days. Users can enter a virtual world where they can interact with people from all parts of the physical world, play games, engage in commerce and do a lot of other things. Some law firms have also seen the potential.

Lawyer is still entitled to disability benefits for depression linked to law practice, 6th Circuit rules

A former Traverse City, Michigan, personal injury lawyer is entitled to continued monthly payments under his disability insurance policy because of evidence that his recurrent depression makes him unable to work as a trial attorney, a federal appeals court has ruled.

Georgia jury reaches $1.7B verdict in case over Ford truck crash

A jury in Georgia decided Friday that the Ford Motor Co. must pay $1.7 billion in punitive damages in a product liability trial involving its F-250 pickup trucks.

Suit seeks damages for traumatic event witnessed over FaceTime; bystander definition at issue

A woman who saw her mother choking on mucus at her nursing home during a FaceTime call has filed a lawsuit against the facility for negligent infliction of emotional distress.

Federal appeals court tosses injured lawyer’s Fourth Amendment claim against ICE agent

An agent with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement has qualified immunity from a Fourth Amendment claim in a lawsuit filed by an injured lawyer, a federal appeals court has ruled.

Woman who jumped into canal to save dog can’t sue under rescue doctrine, top state court rules

A woman who suffered neurological and cognitive injuries after jumping into a canal to save a dog can’t recover damages from its owners under the rescue doctrine, the New Jersey Supreme Court has ruled in a unanimous decision.

Kagan joins majority as Supreme Court allows state to recoup Medicaid costs from injury settlement

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday that a state’s Medicaid program can seek reimbursement from lawsuit settlement payments allocated for the future care of accident victims.

4th Circuit upholds restrictions on lawyer ads seeking drug and device clients

A federal appeals court has upheld West Virginia’s restrictions on lawyer advertising that seeks clients for litigation involving medication and medical devices.

Judge won’t toss $13B suit against Baker Donelson and insurer for alleged spying on litigant

A state court judge in Georgia has refused to toss a $13 billion lawsuit alleging that Baker Donelsen and American Family Insurance conspired to spy on a litigant with illegally placed electronic devices.

Snapchat may be liable for speed filter used by teen before crash, Georgia Supreme Court says

Snapchat may be liable for negligently designing a speed filter used by a teenage driver who recorded speeds of more than 100 miles per hour before she crashed her Mercedes-Benz and severely injured another driver, the Georgia Supreme Court ruled Tuesday.

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