ABA Journal

Insurance & Financial Services

42 ABA Journal Insurance & Financial Services articles.

New data shows lateral associate hiring happening across the board

Lateral hiring for associates increased in nearly all practice groups in the first quarter of 2021, with data privacy, entertainment and media and insurance practices showing the most activity, according to a legal data company.

Appeals court rules against former BigLaw staffer who said work abuse led to disability

A federal appeals court has ruled that a Williams & Connolly staff member wasn’t entitled to collect disability insurance for anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder that she largely blamed on her work environment.

Can businesses recover for pandemic losses? 8th Circuit is first federal appeals court to rule

An Iowa dental clinic can’t recover for COVID-19 "business interruption" losses under an insurance policy that covers "accidental physical loss or accidental physical damage," a federal appeals court has ruled.

Akerman lawyer is appointed as receiver in condo collapse; who may be liable?

A Florida judge on Friday appointed an Akerman partner as a receiver to handle financial matters for the Champlain Towers South condo association in litigation over the building collapse in Surfside, Florida.

Claim denied: A lawyer’s musings on the shortcomings of insurance

As lawyers, many of us either fight insurance companies or represent them. Sue or defend, we are all connected with insurance by buying it. When did the concept of insurance start?

Fee applications in Boy Scouts bankruptcy exceed $100M; judge calls total ‘staggering’

The court overseeing the Boy Scouts of America bankruptcy case has appointed an examiner to review fees that have become a point of contention.

Insurance adjuster didn’t turn off his audio before calling judge an ‘idiot’

A California judge was asking jurors to sit in socially distanced seats when an online voice could be heard on the courtroom speakers. Using the F-word, the person referred to the judge as an “idiot.”

Interested in infectious disease litigation? Before you accept a case, read this

When Davis M. Walsh and Samuel L. Tarry began assembling Infectious Disease Litigation: Science, Law, and Procedure, they had no idea a pandemic was soon going to make the topic more relevant than ever.

Capacity limits on businesses can be a ‘direct physical loss’ covered by insurance, judge rules in bellwether cases

A federal judge in Chicago has ruled that pandemic-related business closings and capacity limits can qualify as a “direct physical loss” to property that is covered by "business interruption" policies.

Pandemic worsens already-growing debt problem with many legal remedies on hold

While many Americans remain jobless, some companies have increased their collection efforts on old debt as they grapple with less revenue amid the sluggish economy. But with government offices and courts closed, it’s hard for attorneys to move cases along.

These 7 larger law firms got the $10M maximum in coronavirus pandemic loans

When the government offered forgivable loans to keep businesses afloat and workers on the payroll during the novel coronavirus pandemic, dozens of larger law firms received the money.

Former general counsel of LeClairRyan agrees to disbarment

Bruce Matson, the former general counsel of the disbanded law firm LeClairRyan, has been disbarred in Virginia after he was accused of misappropriating money from a bankruptcy trust account.

Afternoon Briefs: Judge orders sweep for undelivered ballots; Chamber of Commerce worries US is ignoring injunction

Judge orders postal sweep for undelivered ballots

U.S. District Judge Emmet Sullivan of Washington, D.C., has ordered the U.S. Postal Service to sweep 12 key postal districts for undelivered ballots…

Lawyer accused of threat to have opposing counsel’s ‘rear end sanctioned’ faces ethics complaint

A Florida insurance defense lawyer is accused of unprofessional conduct toward opposing attorneys and a litigant, including a threat to have an opposing counsel’s “rear end sanctioned” over objections made during a deposition.

As its workforce shrinks, this BigLaw firm restores salaries and reorganizes

Bryan Cave Leighton Paisner has cut 4% of its global workforce and reorganized practice groups since undertaking a strategic review last year.

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