ABA Journal

International

2670 ABA Journal International articles.

Former Jones Day partner is fined by UK judge for telling client to delete secure messaging app

A London judge has fined a former Jones Day partner about $28,000 after finding him in contempt of court for telling a client’s business to delete a secure messaging app.

Weekly Briefs: SCOTUS justice’s wife stands by stolen-election views; district attorney’s daughter arrested in his stabbing

Ginni Thomas tells Jan. 6 committee about her stolen-election views

Conservative activist Virginia “Ginni” Thomas told the House committee investigating the Jan. 6, 2021, U.S. Capitol attack that she…

Honduran attorneys bring law-themed Latin coffee shop to Minnesota

The NDA is the name of one of the gourmet coffees at the Abogados Café in St. Paul, Minnesota. Just don’t ask the husband-and-wife team who own the cafe to tell you what’s in it. Given that the beverage is named after a nondisclosure agreement, the couple, lawyers Ofelia Ponce and Inti Martínez-Alemán, are adamant that its ingredients must remain confidential. Even when pressed to reveal the coffee’s secret recipe, they do not fold.

Advocates are helping Afghans apply for asylum and other immigration relief with ABA assistance

Freshta Kohgadai fled with her family from Kabul, Afghanistan, to the United States in the late 1980s. When she discovered the ABA Scholarship for Legal Advocates—a new program that aims to increase the culturally and linguistically competent pro bono services available to Afghan arrivals—she knew she had to apply.

Lawyer who moved from Ukraine to US now has opportunity to help others facing similar situations

An immigration attorney started doing pro bono work for Ukrainian immigrants in February, shortly after Russia invaded the country.

ABA project aims to help Afghan legal professionals establish themselves in the United States

In the weeks following the one-year anniversary of the fall of Kabul to the Taliban on Aug. 15, the ABA Journal is highlighting the ABA’s efforts to help judges and lawyers from Afghanistan resettle, obtain immigration benefits and secure jobs using their legal skills. This is part one in our series.

Biden administration ends ‘Remain in Mexico’ policy waits for asylum-seekers after judge lifts injunction

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security is ending a Trump administration policy that required asylum-seekers entering at the southern border to wait in Mexico while their cases are pending.

Supreme Court allows Biden to end remain-in-Mexico policy; chief justice’s opinion joined by Kavanaugh, liberal justices

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled for the Biden administration on Thursday when it allowed repeal of the remain-in-Mexico policy for asylum-seekers.

How to apply business principles and legal tech to provide humanitarian aid to Ukraine

Ari Kaplan recently spoke with Jeroen Plink, the chief operating officer of the Legaltech Hub, a board member at Casetext and the former CEO of Practical Law; and Jeroen Ketting, the founder and CEO of the Lighthouse Group, a provider of management and trade support to Western companies doing business in Russia and Ukraine.

SCOTUS rules for US citizen who says return of her child to Italy poses grave risk of harm

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Wednesday that U.S. courts can refuse to return children to their home countries in situations posing a grave risk of harm without considering all measures that could reduce the risk.

Uniting for Ukraine draws criticism and praise from resettlement groups

Although some resettlement groups have welcomed President Joe Biden’s streamlined humanitarian parole program for Ukrainians fleeing the war, the initiative also has sparked frustration and claims that other at-risk people are not being offered the same protections.

Supreme Court backlog is the largest in percentage terms since at least 1950

More than half of the cases on the U.S. Supreme Court’s docket have yet to be decided.  As of Friday, the court had 33 opinions remaining, which amounts to 53% of its argued cases this term.

Russian disinformation campaigns threaten trust in the court system, panelists say

Public confidence in the courts is at risk because of Russian disinformation campaigns, panelists said at a symposium at the National Judicial College on Thursday.

Work for Canadian residential school survivors informs lawyer’s debut novel

A lawyer explains how her work informed the writing of her book and why many Indigenous people still feel the impact of the Canadian school system to this day.

Is there a way back for international law firms in Russia?

With pressure mounting on Western companies after Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, some law firms realized they needed to do more than just part ways with clients and decided to wind down operations in the country altogether.

Read more ...