Judiciary

7165 ABA Journal Judiciary articles.

Group’s request for probe into federal judge’s retirement gets a boost
Updated: The chief judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit has taken a preliminary step that could lead to a review of the circumstances surrounding the retirement of one of the court’s judges.
‘This is so boring!’ Unmuted listeners interrupt phone hearing over ICE courthouse arrests
A federal judge in Manhattan has threatened to end a phone hearing over courthouse arrests of immigrants after people listening in to the call failed to put their phones on mute.
Afternoon Briefs: Justice Thomas speaks in SCOTUS teleconference arguments; courts want rule ideas

Few glitches and 1 surprise in SCOTUS teleconference arguments

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas asked questions during the high court’s first teleconference arguments Monday, something he rarely does.…

Federal judge tosses unequal pay claims by US women’s soccer team, allows other claims
A federal judge in Los Angeles tossed pay-bias claims Friday by the U.S. women’s soccer team, finding that the women actually earned more on an average per-game basis than men.
Judge says Kirkland & Ellis ‘should be embarrassed’ by its subpoena response
A federal magistrate judge says Kirkland & Ellis “should be embarrassed” by its response to a subpoena seeking information about lawyers placed at the firm by a legal recruiter.
More than half of Americans support online voting during COVID-19 pandemic, second ABA civics survey shows

As the COVID-19 pandemic quickly spread across the country, the ABA pivoted its second annual survey of civic literacy to gauge Americans’ support for online voting, as well as their thoughts on how the government should respond to a national emergency.

Judge says he has no authority to force retraction of lawyer’s press comments about cops
A federal magistrate judge has ruled that he has no authority to force a retraction by a civil rights lawyer who criticized Kentucky State Police officers.
State supreme court allows in-person jury trial, which ends with defendant nearly collapsing
An Ohio judge tried to hold Tuesday what may be the nation’s first in-person jury trial since shutdown orders began. But it ended when the defendant was carried out of the courthouse on a stretcher.
Afternoon Briefs: 10th Circuit strikes down voter ID law; social distancing could mean long elevator lines

10th Circuit strikes down Kansas voter ID law

The 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals at Denver has struck down a Kansas law that required a birth certificate or…

Second lawmaker sues over Illinois stay-at-home order; first plaintiff won limited TRO
The co-chairman of President Donald Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign in Illinois has filed a lawsuit that challenges the state’s COVID-19 stay-at-home order, calling it “as broad as an ocean.”
Afternoon Briefs: Lawyer is charged in mask-markup plot; another remote LSAT is scheduled

Lawyer is charged in alleged plot to sell KN95 masks at 50% markup

A California lawyer has been charged with conspiring to violate the Defense Production Act by selling one…

Lawyer indefinitely suspended for stealing from mentally ill client, charging legal rate for lawn mowing
The Ohio Supreme Court has indefinitely suspended a lawyer accused of transferring more than $147,000 from the accounts of a mentally ill client, although he and his law firm were only owed about $19,000.
Afternoon Briefs: Federal courts have reopening plan; billable hours cited in mental health survey

Local conditions will guide federal courts in reopening during COVID-19 crisis

Guidelines for the reopening of federal court operations during the novel coronavirus crisis emphasize local decision-making guided by community…

3rd Circuit revives judge’s claims against court officials over seized tape recorder, harassment
A New Jersey superior court judge can sue her assignment judge and other court officials for alleged constitutional and statutory violations, a federal appeals court ruled Monday.
Coronavirus has not stopped many cash-strapped courts from seeking fines and fees

In Vermilion Parish, Louisiana, the sheriff’s department has turned an old bank into a socially distanced payment location where residents can pay court fines and traffic tickets. “Drive-Thru ONLY,” the…

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