Judiciary

7555 ABA Journal Judiciary articles.

In first merits opinion by Barrett, SCOTUS rules against environmental group seeking draft rule-making document
The U.S. Supreme Court ruled 7-2 Thursday that draft rule-making documents were protected from disclosure under a Freedom of Information Act request by the Sierra Club.
Afternoon Briefs: Another state plans remote bar exam in July; Texas AG sues electric company over huge bills

So far, 9 jurisdictions have plan for remote bar exam in July

California’s July 2021 bar exam will be remote, the California Supreme Court announced Friday. The first testing day,…

Judge with ‘salty’ personality gets suspension partly for F-bombs, says word is common in his region
A Kansas judge who dropped F-bombs and refused to “f- - -ing apologize” to one employee subjected to one of his outbursts has been suspended from the bench for “quite troubling” behavior.
Study finds ‘Trump-era uptick’ in partisan voting by en banc courts
En banc appeals courts are increasingly dividing along partisan lines, according to a study by two law professors at the William & Mary Law School.
Judges with corporate and prosecution backgrounds are more likely to rule against workers, study says
Judges who were formerly prosecutors or corporate lawyers are more likely to rule against workers in employment disputes than judges with other backgrounds, according to a new study.
Afternoon Briefs: California opens process for retroactive bar admission; judge suspended after election-fraud charge

California opens applications for retroactive bar admission

Provisional licensure applications, for people who recently did not pass the California bar exam but would have with the new cut score, are…

Judges tell of case delays, high caseloads as House committee considers expanding judgeships
Three federal judges told a House subcommittee Wednesday about case delays and high workloads as lawmakers considered whether to expand the number of federal judgeships.
Does A&E’s ‘Court Cam’ accurately reflect American courtrooms?
I like to start the new year by cleaning out my life, more or less. It’s kind of a ritual for me. I take time to send out file destruction letters to clients whose cases were closed out more than five years ago and permanently delete client communications from my email inbox that are just as old (five years is the rule in Oklahoma). Generally, I try to give myself a bit of a fresh start.
Suits multiply over Texas power outages; is power grid operator protected by sovereign immunity?
Lawsuits are already being filed against the operator of the power grid in Texas over lost lives, property damage and business interruption caused by power outages during the winter storm in February.
6 tips from infectious disease experts for in-person court proceedings

As the pandemic began to rage across America last spring, U.S. District of Maryland Chief Judge James K. Bredar puzzled over how to mount in-person hearings. The judge quickly realized he needed the help of a public health expert. He turned to epidemiologist Dr. Jonathan M. Zenilman.

Barrett, Kavanaugh didn’t join conservative dissenters who called for SCOTUS to hear election challenge

Three conservative dissenting justices have called on the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday to hear a challenge to the 2020 presidential election in Pennsylvania. But two of former President Donald Trump’s appointees were not among them.

ABA House urges Congress to pass judicial security bill
After last year’s deadly attack on a New Jersey federal judge’s home, the ABA House of Delegates adopted a resolution Monday calling on Congress to push for greater protections for members of the judiciary.
Afternoon Briefs: Gunman had file on SCOTUS justice, judge says; state AG charged in fatal crash

Gunman apparently targeted this SCOTUS justice, judge says

Lawyer Roy Den Hollander, the gunman who killed the son of U.S. District Judge Esther Salas of the District…

‘I destroyed my life’: Former Willkie co-chair suspended for paying $75K to boost daughter’s ACT score
Gordon Caplan, the former co-chairman of Willkie Farr & Gallagher, has been suspended from law practice for two years for participating in the college admissions scandal.
Former administrative law judge is censured for punching a lawyer outside a party
A former administrative law judge in New York has been censured for punching a legal aid lawyer outside a Manhattan party in October 2016.

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