ABA Journal

Labor & Employment

3142 ABA Journal Labor & Employment articles.

Weekly Briefs: Legal jobs increase in January; 11th Circuit doesn’t rule out execution by firing squad

Legal industry adds 2,400 jobs

The legal services sector added 2,400 jobs in January, according to preliminary and seasonally adjusted figures released Friday by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.…

Blackballed?

New recreational cannabis laws could make it harder for employers to fire impaired workers

New Jersey now has the equivalent of hall monitors in some workplaces. Except these hall monitors—known officially as workplace impairment recognition experts—are keeping an eye on the adults in the building. They are looking for signs the adults are high.

‘Routine performance management’ can’t be basis for fired associate’s bias suit, BigLaw firm argues

Kirkland & Ellis is arguing that a fired associate’s lawsuit against the firm should be tossed partly because a harassment claim under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act can’t be based on “routine performance management.”

Law is the most stressful profession, newspaper’s analysis finds

The most stressful occupation in the United States is being a lawyer, according to an analysis by the Washington Post of data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Weekly Briefs: SCOTUS sets a record; CUNY law student goes missing

Still no SCOTUS opinions in argued cases

The U.S. Supreme Court has set a record by failing to issue opinions in argued cases this term. Usually, the high court issues…

Supreme Court considers Title VII accommodation for Christian postal worker who wouldn’t work on Sundays

The U.S. Supreme Court agreed Friday to decide the case of a Christian postal worker who quit his job after he was disciplined for refusing to work on Sundays for religious reasons.

Text accusing exiting lawyer of sitting on her keister during maternity leave leads to second departure

An indignant lawyer blasted a colleague in a text for leaving her law firm following paid maternity leave. The Cleveland Metropolitan Bar Association was flooded with angry calls, texts and emails from members expressing outrage and demanding action.

FTC cites unfair competition law to justify proposed ban on noncompete agreements; will it hold up in court?

The Federal Trade Commission has proposed a rule that would ban employers from imposing noncompete agreements on workers and independent contractors.

Longtime disability rights advocate Scott LaBarre dies at 54

Scott LaBarre, a longtime member of the ABA who advocated for the rights of people with disabilities, died on Dec. 10 after a short battle with cancer. He was 54. "Scott was a top lawyer in the disability law area, but he was so much more," ABA President Deborah Enix-Ross told the ABA Journal. "He was a great leader, inspiring, always cheerful and upbeat and loved by all who had the good fortune to know him. He worked tirelessly on behalf of the ABA, making the association a much better organization. He will truly be missed, but his legacy endures."

Being a judge is among top five jobs for importance of stress tolerance, ranking says

Judges and magistrates are among the nation’s top five high-stress jobs, according to an online database of occupations.

Biden relied on 96-year-old law and 1917 Supreme Court decision to impose railway labor agreement

A process outlined in a 96-year-old law governing railroads led to a bill signed Friday by President Joe Biden that imposes a contract agreement between workers and railroads.

If recession comes, how will law firm ‘quiet quitters’ fare?

David Wang, an attorney and chief innovation officer at Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati, has some advice for workers who are “quiet quitting”—the viral term for people who haven’t actually left their jobs but mentally have checked out and are doing only the bare minimum.

Nicotine addiction costs vaping trial lawyer more than $2,100

A federal magistrate judge in Youngstown, Ohio, has sanctioned a suburban Cleveland lawyer more than $2,100 for vaping in the courtroom during the trial of an employment discrimination case.

SCOTUS legal counsel defends Alito dinner with evangelical couple, says leak report is ‘uncorroborated’

The legal counsel for the U.S. Supreme Court is defending Justice Samuel Alito’s ethics following a report from the New York Times alleging that one of the justice's dinner companions later passed along information about the outcome of an upcoming Supreme Court decision to an anti-abortion crusader.

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