Labor & Employment

3001 ABA Journal Labor & Employment articles.

Suit says disciplinary counsel was wrongly fired for pro-Trump tweets about Muslims
A former disciplinary counsel in Tennessee says he was fired for the content of political tweets, rather than his conduct in the job.
BigLaw firm must face suit alleging it broke promise to retain lawyer as long as she ‘performed as an average associate’
A California appeals court has revived a lawsuit alleging that Drinker Biddle & Reath broke its promise to retain a lawyer as long as she "performed as an average associate."
Afternoon Briefs: Last equal pay claim against Jones Day is tossed; law students’ quest for refunds is rejected

Judge tosses last equal pay claim in suit against Jones Day

A federal judge on Wednesday tossed the last equal pay claim by the last plaintiff in the gender…

Polsinelli’s commitment to diversity was ‘mere pretense,’ alleges gay ousted partner in bias suit
A former bankruptcy partner at Polsinelli claims that the firm denied him associate and administrative support, lowered his compensation, de-equitized his partnership, and replaced him with a younger, heterosexual woman, all because of his sexual orientation and age.
Yale prof claims she was wrongly fired after tweeting about Trump, Dershowitz, shared psychosis
A law and psychiatry professor is alleging that she was fired by the Yale School of Medicine because of her critical comments about former President Donald Trump’s mental health and the likelihood that Alan Dershowitz had taken on “Trump’s symptoms by contagion.”
Afternoon Briefs: These law schools are best for BigLaw placement; paralegal claims quarantine led to firing

Go-to law schools are named

Columbia Law School is once again in the top spot on Law.com’s list of go-to law schools. The list ranks law schools that send the…

Biden DOJ outpaces Trump DOJ for reversing US position in pending Supreme Court cases
The Biden administration’s Department of Justice has changed positions in at least five cases before the U.S. Supreme Court, putting it on track to outpace reversals during the first full Supreme Court term under former President Donald Trump.
Afternoon Briefs: Senator airs suspicions of ‘fake’ Kavanaugh probe; prosecutors sue senior living chain

Senator wants to know whether FBI probe of Kavanaugh was ‘fake’

U.S. Attorney General Merrick Garland should help facilitate Senate oversight into whether the FBI conducted a “politically constrained and…

Who’s Zooming who in the lateral partner market?
During my firm’s annual review meeting to discuss a tumultuous 2020, luckily, my phone rang. It was a law firm partner curious about the state of the lateral partner market.
Afternoon Briefs: Judge trims maternity claims against BigLaw firm; prison guards ordered to wear body cams

Judge trims claims by ex-Morrison & Foerster lawyers

A magistrate judge is allowing two former lawyers at Morrison & Foerster to pursue punitive damages in their suit claiming that the…

Afternoon Briefs: 5 Jones Day plaintiffs drop claims; no immunity for cop who shocked girl during seizure

Only 1 plaintiff remains in Jones Day pay-bias suit

Five of six former associates suing Jones Day for gender bias have dropped their claims. The move follows a decision…

After judge takes umbrage at dissenter’s ‘sound and fury’ quote, 5th Circuit grants en banc rehearing
The 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals at New Orleans has granted an en banc rehearing in a case in which the judge who wrote the majority opinion took umbrage at a dissenter’s quotation from Macbeth.
Interested in infectious disease litigation? Before you accept a case, read this
When Davis M. Walsh and Samuel L. Tarry began assembling Infectious Disease Litigation: Science, Law, and Procedure, they had no idea a pandemic was soon going to make the topic more relevant than ever.
Capacity limits on businesses can be a ‘direct physical loss’ covered by insurance, judge rules in bellwether cases
A federal judge in Chicago has ruled that pandemic-related business closings and capacity limits can qualify as a “direct physical loss” to property that is covered by "business interruption" policies.
Paralegal who refused to notarize affidavit because of its contents can sue over her firing, appeals court says

A paralegal who refused to notarize an affidavit because she believed it contained false information can sue over her firing, a Connecticut appeals court has ruled.

Paralegal Helen Sieranski can…

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