ABA Journal

Labor & Employment

3087 ABA Journal Labor & Employment articles.

How I helped win an equal pay victory for the US Women’s National Soccer Team

“For the past two years, I served as lead appellate counsel for the players on the U.S. Women’s National Soccer Team in their equal-pay case against the U.S. Soccer Federation,” writes Nicole A. Saharsky. “So you are probably wondering: How did we get from losing summary judgment and being entitled to $0 to getting $24 million and a guarantee of equal pay for the women’s and men’s national teams?”

Federal court will investigate leak of survey describing alleged bias and bullying by judges

The federal court in Washington, D.C., will investigate the leak of a confidential workplace survey that revealed allegations of bullying and discrimination by some trial-level and appeals judges.

US women’s soccer players will earn the same as men, thanks to a lawsuit and an unusual pooling deal

The U.S. Soccer Federation will pay male and female players the same as a result of unique collective bargaining agreements announced Wednesday.

This federal appeals judge has hired only male law clerks, with one exception, since 1990, survey finds

Federal trial-level and appeals judges in Washington, D.C., are required to attend workplace training this month, after a confidential survey revealed allegations of bullying and discrimination by some judges.

The Great Resignation: The toll taken on the legal field and what comes next

The COVID-19 pandemic has shifted much about what we once considered business as usual. It has created unmatched levels of flexibility across industries—many of which had very few flexible options pre-pandemic.

Weekly Briefs: SCOTUS to hear case on nursing home suits; Trump’s business to pay $750K to settle suit

SCOTUS agrees to hear 3 new cases

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday agreed to hear cases on overtime pay, nursing home lawsuits and erased bankruptcy debt. The cases are:

Credit reporting law doesn’t give job seekers a right to explain criminal history, 8th Circuit says

A job applicant turned down for a job because she didn’t disclose her criminal history can’t sue the employer in federal court for a violation of the Fair Credit Reporting Act, a federal appeals court has ruled.

First Amendment doesn’t protect fired police officers who criticized department changes, 6th Circuit rules

The First Amendment does not protect two Tennessee police officers who were fired for objecting to changes in their department, an appeals court has ruled.

Federal court officials can be sued for alleged failure to protect public defender from sex bias, 4th Circuit rules

A federal appeals court ruled Tuesday that a former assistant federal public defender in North Carolina can sue court officials for constitutional violations stemming from an alleged faulty investigation of sexual harassment.

Restaurants can’t recover COVID-19 losses through ‘business interruption’ insurance, 2 top state courts rule

The top state courts in Iowa and Massachusetts have ruled that restaurants can’t recover COVID-19 shutdown losses from "business interruption" policies.

Weekly Briefs: Prof gets $400K settlement in pronoun case; panic-attack firing leads to $450K verdict

Prof who refused to use preferred pronouns gets $400K settlement

Shawnee State University in Ohio has agreed to pay philosophy professor Nicholas Meriwether $400,000 and to rescind a written warning…

2Civility’s new executive director speaks out against workplace bullying

As the new executive director of the Illinois Supreme Court Commission on Professionalism, or 2Civility, attorney Erika Harold wants to use her platform to shine a light on workplace bullying.

Refugee lawyer describes harrowing invasion of Ukraine

A Ukrainian lawyer described the harrowing scenes she witnessed after the Russian invasion, telling an ABA panel on April 7 that she was forced to flee her country with her three young children and leave behind her husband.

Lawyers have an obligation to ensure employees don’t solicit clients, new ABA ethics opinion says

Attorneys not only must refrain from engaging in improper direct solicitation of potential clients, but there is also an ethical responsibility to ensure that employees or others hired by the lawyers do not engage in such misconduct.

5th Circuit tells lawyer it is ‘often advisable to read the court’s orders,’ upholds $1,250 sanction

A federal appeals court has upheld a $1,250 sanction against a Dallas lawyer for the attorney fees incurred by his litigation opponent when he misread a federal judge’s ruling.

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