ABA Journal

Law Professors

1635 ABA Journal Law Professors articles.

When the law teacher becomes the student

If there’s one thing the pandemic taught us, it’s our need for nimble adaptation. Law has historically been slow to adapt to change and innovation. But the arrival of COVID-19 changed the way we conduct business, from navigating Zoom hearings and using VPNs to juggling child care and homeschooling for those with young children. Even turning off video filters proved challenging, as illustrated by the kitty cat lawyer Zoom hearing on YouTube.

Typo in 1928 Supreme Court opinion created ‘reign of error,’ law prof says

A tiny typographical error in a 1928 U.S. Supreme Court opinion had a big impact after it was picked up in subsequent opinions and used to bolster arguments for property rights, a law professor has found.

Weekly Briefs: Texas abortion clinics return to SCOTUS; law prof known for critical race theory work wins award

Texas abortion clinics seek SCOTUS review

Abortion providers in Texas asked the U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday to consider whether their lawsuit challenging the state’s restrictive law can go forward.…

Law prof’s memo told Pence he could give Trump election win as ‘ultimate arbiter’ in elector count

A conservative law professor wrote a memo telling then-Vice President Mike Pence how he could give then-President Donald Trump an election win when Congress counted Electoral College votes Jan. 6.

At some law schools, why are those who teach called ‘instructor’ rather than ‘professor’?

At Rutgers Law School, everyone who teaches law is called a professor, but that is not true at many other institutions, where faculty who teach topics including legal writing, academic success and clinical work are often given titles including “instructor” or “director.” They are usually paid less than tenure-track professors and sometimes have little if any job security.

Law school clinic wins reversal of 1993 conviction based on prosecutor’s remarks about ‘trickster lovers’

A prosecutor’s closing argument about sadomasochistic “trickster lovers” made a 1993 sexual assault trial so fundamentally unfair that the conviction should be reversed, a federal appeals court has ruled.

State supreme court’s chief justice declares justice system emergency to increase pro bono representation

The Virginia Supreme Court’s chief justice has issued an emergency order to increase the pool of lawyers who can represent indigent tenants who are facing eviction and others in need of free legal help.

Law prof’s federal discrimination suit against University of Idaho allowed to go forward

A U.S. district judge last week denied the University of Idaho’s motion for summary judgment on gender and race discrimination claims brought by a Black female law professor who claims she was unfairly denied an associate dean position and a stipend.

Law professors Stephen and Barbara Gillers turn breakfast chats into legal ethics podcast

It all started with John Dean, Stephen Gillers tells me. In 1973, Dean, President Richard Nixon’s White House counsel, testified at the Senate Watergate hearings. He provided the committee investigating the scandal with a list of those likely to be indicted for their roles. Dean put asterisks next to those who were lawyers. There were 10.

A lawyer’s primer on loss: Grieving the death of a parent

“We are on borrowed time now.” That is what the manager at the assisted living facility where my father has lived for nearly four years gently tells me. A few weeks earlier, during a phone consult with my younger brother and me, my father’s physician introduces the word "hospice" into the conversation.

‘Common good originalism’ is neither originalist nor a good way to judge, essay says

Some conservatives are backing a more activist brand of judging that reads moral values into the Constitution as a counter to liberals’ push to read the Constitution as a living document that changes with the times.

Law professor makes a case against automating legal writing in law school

Give a dozen brilliant mathematicians the same problem, and they will give you the same answer. Math has an objective truth to it; however, legal writing is different.

Afternoon Briefs: 2 appeals nominees in latest judicial picks; axed dean will remain as law prof

Biden announces new round of judicial picks

President Joe Biden’s fifth round of judicial picks includes nominees to two federal appeals courts. Virginia Solicitor General Toby Heytens is nominated to…

Don’t call him ‘sir’: Law prof reflects on receiving honorary knight award from the UK

Philip Bobbitt, a Columbia Law School professor, is not sure when the ceremonies will take place in recognition of him being awarded an honorary knighthood by Queen Elizabeth II. At the moment, most of his time is taken up looking after his four young children, and they have different titles for him.

Longtime leader in legal ethics and professional responsibility will receive ABA Medal

Through a legal career that spans more than five decades, Lawrence Fox has become nationally recognized for his leadership in professional responsibility and legal ethics and his commitment to pro bono work.

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