ABA Journal

Legal Education

1277 ABA Journal Legal Education articles.

Weekly Briefs: Texas abortion clinics return to SCOTUS; law prof known for critical race theory work wins award

Texas abortion clinics seek SCOTUS review

Abortion providers in Texas asked the U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday to consider whether their lawsuit challenging the state’s restrictive law can go forward.…

Law prof’s memo told Pence he could give Trump election win as ‘ultimate arbiter’ in elector count

A conservative law professor wrote a memo telling then-Vice President Mike Pence how he could give then-President Donald Trump an election win when Congress counted Electoral College votes Jan. 6.

ABA’s inaugural Equity Summit will highlight importance of inclusion; guests include Justice Sotomayor

Throughout the summit’s four days of programming, registrants can attend five CLE programs; four TED-style talks; three workshops on critical diversity equity and inclusion issues; and a fireside discussion Sept. 29 with U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor.

New findings published on law school debt

A survey released Tuesday asked young attorneys if their legal education was worth the cost, and fewer than half said yes. However, 60.9% of respondents said that if they had to do it over, they would still attend law school.

National mean scaled score for August MBE slightly decreases compared to 2019

For the July 2021 Multistate Bar Examination, which had 45,872 test-takers, the national mean scaled score was 140.4, according to a Wednesday news release from the National Conference of Bar Examiners.

At some law schools, why are those who teach called ‘instructor’ rather than ‘professor’?

At Rutgers Law School, everyone who teaches law is called a professor, but that is not true at many other institutions, where faculty who teach topics including legal writing, academic success and clinical work are often given titles including “instructor” or “director.” They are usually paid less than tenure-track professors and sometimes have little if any job security.

Law school clinic wins reversal of 1993 conviction based on prosecutor’s remarks about ‘trickster lovers’

A prosecutor’s closing argument about sadomasochistic “trickster lovers” made a 1993 sexual assault trial so fundamentally unfair that the conviction should be reversed, a federal appeals court has ruled.

Law school dinged for noncompliance with ABA standard addressing financial conditions

Cleveland State University's Cleveland-Marshall College of Law has been found to be out of compliance with an ABA accreditation standard focused on program resources.

Following a viral video, Harvard Law School student finds ways to connect remotely

Many Harvard Law School students knew of classmate Rehan Staton through a July 2020 video that went viral, which featured him opening a Harvard Law School acceptance email. There’s a lot more to him than the video, and Staton wanted to connect with classmates more significantly while they attended remote classes over the past year.

Minnesota lifer may be first woman to take proctored LSAT in prison

A Minnesota inmate sentenced to life in prison without parole may be the first woman to take a proctored Law School Admission Test while incarcerated.

State supreme court’s chief justice declares justice system emergency to increase pro bono representation

The Virginia Supreme Court’s chief justice has issued an emergency order to increase the pool of lawyers who can represent indigent tenants who are facing eviction and others in need of free legal help.

Student loan data will become part of law schools’ ABA required disclosures

Starting with the 2023-2024 school year, law schools’ Standard 509 Information Reports will include information about the number of students who receive student loans, and the data will be categorized by race, ethnicity and gender.

These 10 law schools are the choosiest

If you applied to your favorite law school last year only to face rejection, you are in good company.

Law prof’s federal discrimination suit against University of Idaho allowed to go forward

A U.S. district judge last week denied the University of Idaho’s motion for summary judgment on gender and race discrimination claims brought by a Black female law professor who claims she was unfairly denied an associate dean position and a stipend.

Judge denies Florida Coastal’s motion to reinstate federal aid

A federal judge has denied the Florida Coastal School of Law's motion for preliminary injunctive relief against the U.S. Department of Education seeking to reinstate student federal aid.

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