Legal Education

1089 ABA Journal Legal Education articles.

October online bar is less than a month away, and test-takers report significant software problems

State board of law examiners are requiring that people who wish to sit for the October online bar exam take and submit mock exams. However, these mock exams are causing computer problems for some, and software provider ExamSoft is providing little if any assistance, according to people planning to take the exam.

Does age and gender affect judges’ sentences? New study suggests nuanced answer
Researchers who studied nearly 3,000 sentences imposed over a 16-year period in Colorado found that judges' age and gender correlated with differences in sentence length—but only for serious crimes.
CNN defamed me by falsely reporting my impeachment views, Alan Dershowitz says in $300M suit
Lawyer Alan Dershowitz, a former professor at Harvard Law School, has filed a $300 million defamation lawsuit against CNN over its coverage of his views on high crimes and misdemeanors.
No bathroom break allowed? Suit says rules for remote bar exam discriminate against disabled grads
A lawsuit by law graduates who have disabilities says they will be forced to take the California bar exam in person because of a failure to provide accommodations for a remote test.
Recent bar admittees offer study strategies to stay focused in stressful times—including the pandemic

From staying organized with small poster boards and using multiple Sharpie pens to finding a compatible study buddy or just getting outside for some fresh air, two bar exam admittees offer tips to study for and pass a bar exam and steer clear of the stress that comes with it.

California law deans ask for open-book bar exam, citing fires, racism and tech issues
A group of deans from ABA-accredited law schools in California have asked the California Supreme Court to change its online October bar exam to an open-book format with no remote proctoring.
Vanderbilt Law Review members donate fees to support minority students with ABA diversity scholarship

When leaders of the Vanderbilt Law Review realized they would meet remotely this semester, they also realized they wouldn’t need to collect the dues that usually pay for their space and supplies. Rather than dwelling on the COVID-19 pandemic and how it prevented them from coming together, the VLR’s executive editor says they saw it as an opportunity to put their dues to good use.

Afternoon Briefs: COVID-19 outbreak in attorney’s office leads to court suspension; prosecutor killed while cycling

COVID-19 outbreak in Jefferson County attorney’s office leads to court suspension

Three criminal court dockets in the Jefferson County Circuit Court in Louisville, Kentucky, will be suspended through Sept. 30…

Classmates’ comments should be confidential, Harvard Law says in new social media policy
If you are a Harvard Law School student making a social media post about something said in class, you should not write it in a way that identifies the speaker to those who were not there, according to a new policy at the school.
‘Talk less, smile more’: The Hamilton-Burr conundrum law students face today

Law students, like Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr, are facing questions of whether to stay silent or speak up about societal issues such as social justice in this country, their interests and safety amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

Why did the average scaled score for the July multistate bar exam improve?
Despite many concerns about taking a bar exam during the novel coronavirus pandemic, the crisis might have actually led to people doing better on the test.
How are things working out for 3 Utah law grads seeking diploma privilege?

Prior to this summer, Chase Wilde didn’t know how to file a court appearance. Thanks to the supervised practice requirement in the Utah Supreme Court’s temporary order for diploma privilege, he does now.

This law prof has been fighting off Twitter trolls during the coronavirus crisis
While Veena Dubal was adapting to working at home with three young children during the COVID-19 pandemic, the “reply guys” came after the California law professor on Twitter for her support of a 2020 state law that extends employee classification status to gig workers.
Afternoon Briefs: Bankruptcy classes more popular; John Pierce representing teen in Kenosha shootings

More law students are taking bankruptcy classes

Some law professors are reporting the demand for their bankruptcy classes is booming. Ronald Mann, a Columbia Law School professor, told Thomson Reuters…

Afternoon Briefs: 4th Circuit rules for transgender youth; tribe objects to execution

4th Circuit rules for transgender youth on bathroom policy

The 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals at Richmond, Virginia, has ruled for former high school student Gavin Grimm, a…

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