Louisiana

460 ABA Journal Louisiana articles.

En banc 5th Circuit allows Medicaid defunding of Planned Parenthood
Medicaid patients don’t have a right to sue over a state’s decision to end Medicaid funding for Planned Parenthood, the en banc 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals at New Orleans ruled Monday.
Afternoon Briefs: Proposed $26B opioid settlement revealed; Florida judge reprimanded for noise response

Proposed $26B opioid settlement disclosed

Four companies involved in making and distributing opioids have disclosed a proposed $26 billion settlement that would end thousands of lawsuits by state and local…

Can Black Lives Matter protest organizer be liable for officer’s injury? Supreme Court vacates ruling for cop
The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday vacated a decision allowing a Louisiana police officer to sue the organizer of a Black Lives Matter protest for a serious injury caused when a different protester threw a heavy object.
Prisoner wins parole after getting life sentence for trying to steal hedge clippers in 1997
A Louisiana man sentenced to life in prison for trying to steal hedge clippers was granted parole Thursday after spending more than 20 years in prison for the crime.
Oregon and Louisiana grapple with past criminal convictions made with split verdicts

In April, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Ramos v. Louisiana that split verdicts in state trials for serious criminal offenses violated the Sixth Amendment right to a fair trial, overturning a high court ruling in 1972 that upheld them. The effect of the court’s ruling in Ramos is that state courts will now vacate cases with split verdicts on direct appeal. Prosecutors will next decide whether to retry them. What is unclear is whether the ruling will apply retroactively.

Man accused of staging crashes is shot and killed; indictment suggests more charges coming
A New Orleans man accused of staging crashes with 18-wheeler trucks was shot and killed last Tuesday, just four days after his indictment.
Afternoon Briefs: Mueller prosecutor has regrets in tell-all book; federal courthouse is a hurricane casualty

Book by Mueller prosecutor says more could have been done

A book by Andrew Weissmann, a former prosecutor for special counsel Robert Mueller said the office failed to fully investigate…

This Louisiana judge continues to innovate during the COVID-19 crisis
Judge Scott Schlegel’s history of utilizing technology in his Louisiana courtroom to make life easier for attorneys and members of the public has come in very handy during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Will Roberts opinion ‘eviscerate abortion rights’? 8th Circuit cites new standard
Abortion restrictions should be evaluated under a new approach as a result of a June opinion by U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr., a federal appeals court said Friday.
Public approval for SCOTUS surges after latest blockbuster term, report says

The public’s approval of the U.S. Supreme Court is the highest it has been in more than a decade, according to a new poll from Gallup.  The results, released Wednesday, show that 58% of Americans say the Supreme Court handles its job responsibly.

Afternoon Briefs: Suit filed for immigrant children detained at hotel; ill judge doesn’t have to sign reelection papers

Lawsuit filed for immigrant children detained at Hampton Inn

A lawyer with the Texas Civil Rights Project was forced out of a Hampton Inn hotel in McAllen, Texas, where he…

New York and Illinois join others moving to October online bar exam; another jurisdiction grants diploma privilege
In light of public health concerns, Illinois and New York have joined the growing list of states that canceled in-person bar exams, with plans for an October remote test offered by the National Conference of Bar Examiners.
Wrongfully convicted man hopes to win ‘America’s Got Talent’ and suit against criminal justice system

Inside Louisiana’s maximum security prison, inmate Archie Williams used to watch America’s Got Talent and visualize himself performing on the show. It was a dream that couldn’t have seemed further from reality. But on May 26—37 years after his conviction and a little over a year since his exoneration and release—his improbable dream came true.

Louisiana backs out of in-person and remote July bar exams, and New Jersey cancels as well
Instead of following a May plan to shorten the Louisiana bar exam from three days to one, and offer it in person and online, the state announced Wednesday that both July tests will be canceled.
BigLaw firms and legal clinics join ACLU in initiative to stop racism in policing
Large law firms and legal clinics are partnering with the American Civil Liberties Union of Louisiana in its campaign "to dismantle racially discriminatory policing practices."

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