ABA Journal

Media & Communications Law

1503 ABA Journal Media & Communications Law articles.

FTC’s revised antitrust suit against Facebook survives motion to dismiss

A federal judge in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday allowed the Federal Trade Commission to proceed with its revised antitrust lawsuit against Facebook.

Judge refuses to toss Dominion’s $1.6B defamation suit against Fox News

A Delaware superior court judge has refused to dismiss a $1.6 billion defamation lawsuit filed by Dominion Voting Systems against Fox News over the network’s election fraud claims.

Weekly Briefs: New charges against lawyer accused of staging his shooting; Christian florist settles

Suspended lawyer Alex Murdaugh faces new charges

Suspended South Carolina lawyer Alex Murdaugh, previously charged in an alleged scheme to have himself killed for insurance money, is facing 27…

Judge is suspended once again for social media posts—this time for soliciting hurricane donations

A South Carolina probate judge has been suspended for 18 months, partly for soliciting hurricane relief donations on Facebook and partly for his all-caps declaration as a would-be character witness.

Social media companies that posted ISIS content aren’t liable for Pulse nightclub shooting, 11th Circuit rules

A federal appeals court has ruled social media companies can’t be held liable for radicalizing the Pulse nightclub gunman under the federal Anti-Terrorism Act because the plaintiffs failed to show the massacre was an act of “international terrorism.”

Trump sues niece for disclosing his tax records and the New York Times for encouraging it

Former President Donald Trump filed a lawsuit Tuesday against the New York Times and Mary Trump, his niece, that seeks at least $100 million in damages for her disclosure of his tax records to the newspaper.

Zoom agrees to $85M settlement in litigation over privacy and ‘Zoombombings’

Zoom Video Communications has agreed to pay $85 million to settle nationwide litigation alleging misrepresentations and broken promises regarding customers’ security and privacy.

Do we need to rethink how we handle classified leaks?

As the 50th anniversary of the Pentagon Papers case approached, First Amendment scholars Lee Bollinger and Geoffrey Stone knew they wanted to mark the occasion somehow.

Afternoon Briefs: Judge rejects $2B Roundup settlement; Dershowitz pursues defamation suits

Judge rejects $2B settlement in Roundup litigation

U.S. District Judge Vince Chhabria of the Northern District of California has rejected a proposed $2 billion settlement of future claims in litigation…

FCC approves plan to make some phone calls cheaper for inmates and their families

The Federal Communications Commission voted unanimously Thursday to make phone calls more affordable for people in prisons or jails by approving a plan to reduce out-of-state call rates by at least one-third.

Can Congress stop Twitter from blocking users? Thomas considers idea as Supreme Court vacates Trump decision

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas considered ways that Congress could regulate Twitter and other digital platforms in a concurrence Monday to the high court’s decision to vacate a decision involving former President Donald Trump.

Google’s use of Java code was fair use, SCOTUS rules in Oracle copyright battle

Google did not violate copyright law when it copied a portion of Java programming language for use in its Android platform for smartphones, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday in a 6-2 decision.

Supreme Court rules for Facebook in dispute over texts; justices spar over ‘series-qualifier canon’

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled for Facebook on Thursday in a dispute over the reach of a law that restricts calls to cellphones made with an “automatic telephone dialing system.”

Chemerinsky: SCOTUS weighs whether freedom of speech applies to students off campus using social media

The U.S. Supreme Court will hear its last oral arguments of the term in April, and it will finish with a First Amendment case of potential great importance. Mahanoy Area School District v. B.L. involves whether a student can be punished for speech on social media over the weekend.

Public defender with Patreon for FOIA lawsuits shares her thoughts on lawyers and social media

Lawyer Beth Bourdon is willing to go places where other attorneys may be hesitant, including this summer when she joined Parler—to see how long she could post potentially offensive materials without getting kicked off the conservative social media site.

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