Missouri

425 ABA Journal Missouri articles.

Afternoon Briefs: Election lawyer referred for court discipline; public defender waiting list declared unconstitutional

Lawyer refers election lawyer for discipline

U.S. District Judge James Boasberg of the District of Columbia has referred a Minneapolis lawyer to a court grievance committee for possible discipline after…

Afternoon Briefs: 2 death-row inmates test positive for COVID-19; US attorney in Missouri will resign

2 federal inmates test positive for COVID-19 ahead of January executions

Cory Johnson and Dustin John Higgs, two federal prisoners who are scheduled to be executed on Jan. 14 and…

For first time in history, federal government carried out more civilian executions than all 50 states
Ten federal inmates were executed this year as a result of a push by the Department of Justice, putting the total number of federal executions above that of all 50 states combined.
Afternoon Briefs: District attorney is accused of plotting truck theft; husband and wife lawyers sue over gun photo

District attorney is accused of hiring his kids, conspiring to steal truck

Lee County, Alabama, District Attorney Brandon Hughes has been charged with illegally hiring his children and lying to…

Afternoon Briefs: Judge requires report disclaimer; $2.1B baby powder verdict allowed to stand

Judge requires disclaimer in cop commission report

U.S. District Judge John Bates of the District of Columbia has said President Donald Trump’s national commission on policing can’t release a report…

Afternoon Briefs: Top DOJ officials backed family separations; judge forgives gunman who killed her son

Top DOJ officials said to be ‘driving force’ in family separations

Former U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions and his deputy attorney general, Rod Rosenstein, told federal prosecutors in 2018 that…

Judge tosses suit alleging racially motivated conspiracy to oust reform-minded prosecutor
A federal judge has tossed a lawsuit by St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner that alleged that the city and police union sought to engineer her ouster and took part in a racially motivated conspiracy to interfere with her reform efforts.
8th Circuit rules judge can’t sentence defendant after telling him federal system ‘sucks,’ advising on plea bargain
A federal judge in Kansas City, Missouri, can’t sentence a defendant after telling him that the federal judicial system “sucks,” and he probably would get less time if he opted for trial instead of a guilty plea, a federal appeals court has ruled.
Afternoon Briefs: 7th Circuit rules on jail’s COVID-19 safety measures; ABA asks FEMA to activate disaster legal services

7th Circuit weighs in on federal judge’s order to curb COVID-19 at Cook County Jail

The 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals at Chicago affirmed Tuesday most of a federal…

Insurers rack up early wins in lawsuits over COVID-19 ‘business interruption’ coverage
Court decisions on "business interruption" coverage are so far favoring insurers as they fight claims for lost income during the COVID-19 pandemic.
8th Circuit rules against grand juror who wanted to talk about Michael Brown case
A federal appeals court has ruled against a grand juror who wanted to correct the record after a prosecutor discussed evidence in the 2014 fatal shooting of Michael Brown, an 18-year-old Black man, by a white police officer in Ferguson, Missouri.
Afternoon Briefs: Actor Jussie Smollett’s prosecutors are reviewed; enhanced protection is recommended for judges

No crimes by prosecutors found in Jussie Smollett case

Special prosecutor Dan Webb has found “substantial abuses of discretion” but no criminal wrongdoing by prosecutors who dropped charges against actor…

Fans of baseball will be missed this upcoming season—but not their legal headaches

The national pastime, played in empty stadiums, at long last gets underway on Thursday. The cheer of the crowd will be sorely missed. But the absence of fans will also spare Major League Baseball teams from legal headaches that can arise when the seats are filled.

After lawyers charged for waving guns at protesters, Missouri attorney general plans to intervene
Husband and wife lawyers Mark and Patricia McCloskey were each charged with unlawful use of a weapon Monday for waving guns at protesters outside their St. Louis home last month. The Missouri governor and attorney general opposed the charges.
Are lawyers who pointed guns at protesters protected by the castle doctrine?
St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kimberly Gardner said Monday she is investigating after husband and wife lawyers brandished a handgun and a rifle at protesters passing their home on a private street.

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