Missouri

418 ABA Journal Missouri articles.

8th Circuit rules judge can’t sentence defendant after telling him federal system ‘sucks,’ advising on plea bargain
A federal judge in Kansas City, Missouri, can’t sentence a defendant after telling him that the federal judicial system “sucks,” and he probably would get less time if he opted for trial instead of a guilty plea, a federal appeals court has ruled.
Afternoon Briefs: 7th Circuit rules on jail’s COVID-19 safety measures; ABA asks FEMA to activate disaster legal services

7th Circuit weighs in on federal judge’s order to curb COVID-19 at Cook County Jail

The 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals at Chicago affirmed Tuesday most of a federal…

Insurers rack up early wins in lawsuits over COVID-19 ‘business interruption’ coverage
Court decisions on "business interruption" coverage are so far favoring insurers as they fight claims for lost income during the COVID-19 pandemic.
8th Circuit rules against grand juror who wanted to talk about Michael Brown case
A federal appeals court has ruled against a grand juror who wanted to correct the record after a prosecutor discussed evidence in the 2014 fatal shooting of Michael Brown, an 18-year-old Black man, by a white police officer in Ferguson, Missouri.
Afternoon Briefs: Actor Jussie Smollett’s prosecutors are reviewed; enhanced protection is recommended for judges

No crimes by prosecutors found in Jussie Smollett case

Special prosecutor Dan Webb has found “substantial abuses of discretion” but no criminal wrongdoing by prosecutors who dropped charges against actor…

Fans of baseball will be missed this upcoming season—but not their legal headaches

The national pastime, played in empty stadiums, at long last gets underway on Thursday. The cheer of the crowd will be sorely missed. But the absence of fans will also spare Major League Baseball teams from legal headaches that can arise when the seats are filled.

After lawyers charged for waving guns at protesters, Missouri attorney general plans to intervene
Husband and wife lawyers Mark and Patricia McCloskey were each charged with unlawful use of a weapon Monday for waving guns at protesters outside their St. Louis home last month. The Missouri governor and attorney general opposed the charges.
Are lawyers who pointed guns at protesters protected by the castle doctrine?
St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kimberly Gardner said Monday she is investigating after husband and wife lawyers brandished a handgun and a rifle at protesters passing their home on a private street.
Afternoon Briefs: Another law firm cuts pay; officer fired in shooting death of Breonna Taylor

Another law firm cuts pay for lawyers and staffers

Holland & Hart is reducing profit distributions to equity partners and cutting pay for salaried lawyers by 15%. Staff members who…

Afternoon Briefs: ‘Highly irregular conduct’ by DOJ alleged; satanist loses abortion case

DOJ engaged in ‘highly irregular conduct,’ says amicus appointee in Michael Flynn case

The U.S. Department of Justice “engaged in highly irregular conduct to benefit a political ally of the…

Missouri execution is first since coronavirus pandemic declared; ABA had urged delay

A Missouri inmate who was executed Tuesday evening had continued to maintain his innocence up until his final breaths. Walter Barton, 64, was executed by lethal injection after the U.S. Supreme Court denied a stay application.

Afternoon Briefs: Missouri sues China over COVID-19; lawyer accused of threatening cameraman

Missouri is first state to sue China over COVID-19

The state of Missouri has filed a lawsuit against China that contends that its government covered up knowledge of COVID-19 and…

Judge allows suit alleging another judge ordered drug testing of courtroom observers
Judicial immunity does not completely protect a Missouri judge in a lawsuit accusing him of jailing and drug testing three courtroom observers, a federal judge has ruled.
Cops charge people for coughing on grocery store shelves, police officers during pandemic
People accused of intentionally coughing on grocery store shelves and police officers are facing criminal charges, as is one man accused of licking grocery containers.
Federal judge refuses to OK consent decree limiting caseloads for Missouri public defenders
A federal judge in Missouri has refused to approve a consent decree that would have limited state public defenders to no more than 173.3 hours worth of cases each month, a standard that is based on a 40-hour workweek.

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