New Attorneys

32 ABA Journal New Attorneys articles.

Data shows decrease in long-term, full-time jobs for 2020 law school grads
For 2020 graduates of ABA-accredited law schools, 77.4% had long-term, full-time jobs that required or preferred bar passage, compared to 80.6% for the class of 2019.
11 tips to survive your freshman year as an associate
Concerns about starting your first job after law school are justified. It is terrifying. For many, the first year as an associate will be your first professional job. Little has prepared you for the difficult, confusing and stressful first year ahead.
Afternoon Briefs: California opens process for retroactive bar admission; judge suspended after election-fraud charge

California opens applications for retroactive bar admission

Provisional licensure applications, for people who recently did not pass the California bar exam but would have with the new cut score, are…

ABA’s Practice Forward group puts focus on members’ needs, well-being
The challenges confronting the legal profession as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic have been a prime focus of the 2021 ABA Midyear Meeting.
Tampons and pads shouldn’t be prohibited at bar exam, ABA House says
The right of bar examinees to bring tampons and pads with them was addressed in a measure overwhelmingly approved by the House of Delegates at the ABA Midyear Meeting on Monday.
Top 5 Your Voice columns of 2020

From what law students can learn from the musical Hamilton to tips on marketing your practice during the pandemic, the ABA Journal’s Your Voice section hosted a number of fascinating columns in 2020.

5 ways to do more pro bono in 2021

For attorneys who want to do more pro bono in 2021, here are five ways to get involved.

How late-career litigators can reinvent themselves as law firm mentors
“Do you have a minute?” In my job, the answer to that question has to be “yes”—almost always. No one arrives in your office with a pained look on their face, unless it involves something that needs to get done now. Maybe it doesn’t rise to the level of a practice crisis or emotional emergency, but the lawyer across from you wants to complete this task right away.
New study suggests cutting bar exam multiple choice questions or making them open book
Bar exams should use multiple choice questions sparingly, if at all, replace essay questions with performance tests, and require supervised clinical work for licensure, according to a study focused on minimum competency to practice law by the Institute for the Advancement of the American Legal System.
Law student debt averages about $165K at graduation, creating stress and restricting choices, survey says
Young lawyers are so impacted by student debt that they are making life-changing decisions, such as delaying children and, in some cases, choosing a job because of its higher pay, according to a survey posted online Monday.
Would-be lawyer, 87, wants to try to pass the bar again, but obstacles remain
An 87-year-old would-be lawyer wants to take another crack at the California bar exam after failing four times in the 1960s.
Law firms lost 15 associates for every 20 they hired, NALP Foundation study finds
For every 20 associates hired by law firms, 15 left, according to a study that collected information from more than 800 law firms.
You accepted a clerkship; now what? A to-do list for before your first day
‘Tis the season. No, not for holiday shopping (thankfully), but for law clerk hiring. Prospective clerks are hearing back on offers for next year right about now, and it’s never too early to begin preparing. I often muse on my time as a law clerk and the rewards of the experience. And although articles abound regarding the benefits of a clerkship, there are few that offer advice to incoming clerks on what they should do to prepare for the experience.
Surveyed midlevel associates discuss snacks, decor, boring work and burnout
Midlevel associates waxed philosophical, critiqued office food and decor, and discussed burnout in verbatim comments collected in an American Lawyer survey.
Self-awareness, mentors and family propel former C student to Harvard Law acceptance

Rehan Staton has always done things differently. “People say I take notes differently, I learn differently. People say in general I have a peculiar way of doing things, but it always worked for me,” Staton, 24, says.

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