ABA Journal

Oklahoma

267 ABA Journal Oklahoma articles.

Supreme Court declines to block 4 executions in 2 days; 1 inmate spared, for now, because of vein issues

The U.S. Supreme Court this week declined to block four executions over the course of two days, rejecting petitions claiming incompetence for execution, difficulty inserting intravenous lines, lack of a clear policy on religious rights and new exculpatory evidence.

Tulsa Reckoning

With the clock ticking, the stakes are high. This case could be the “last best hope” for the survivors to see some form of justice before they die. “This massacre impacted Black people around this nation. This is a win that we need as a people.”

Weekly Briefs: SCOTUS justice’s wife stands by stolen-election views; district attorney’s daughter arrested in his stabbing

Ginni Thomas tells Jan. 6 committee about her stolen-election views

Conservative activist Virginia “Ginni” Thomas told the House committee investigating the Jan. 6, 2021, U.S. Capitol attack that she…

Barrett joined dissenting liberal justices as Supreme Court allowed execution of inmate seeking nitrogen death

Conservative U.S. Supreme Court Justice Amy Coney Barrett joined the high court’s three liberal justices to dissent Thursday, when it allowed the execution of an inmate who claimed that Alabama lost his request for execution by nitrogen hypoxia.

Weekly Briefs: Embryos can be tax dependents; top state court upholds mail voting

Georgia allows embryos to be claimed as dependents

Embryos with a “detectable human heartbeat” can be claimed as dependents on state income tax returns in Georgia. The Georgia Department of…

Federal judge rules for drug distributors in opioid trial, says case fails under West Virginia nuisance law

A federal judge has ruled for three major drug distributors in a bench trial contending that their conduct created an opioid epidemic in Huntington, West Virginia, and the state’s Cabell County.

Lawyer is disbarred after trying to run his law practice from jail

The Oklahoma Supreme Court has disbarred a lawyer who continued practicing law from jail after his conviction for shooting and injuring a man outside an Oklahoma City nightclub.

What are abortion trigger laws, and where do they stand?

Less than a week after the U.S. Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, more than a dozen states have already or plan to soon ban abortion in most cases. Here’s what we know so far about where abortion bans stand in these 13 states and in other states that have laws targeting the procedure.

SCOTUS limits scope of McGirt, allows Oklahoma to prosecute some crimes on reservations

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled 5-4 Wednesday that Oklahoma has the authority to prosecute crimes by non-Indians against Native Americans on reservations. The decision limits the reach of a prior decision that barred the state from prosecuting tribal members on reservations.

Reed Smith’s pro bono report expresses ‘grave’ concerns about death row inmate’s conviction

A lawyer for an Oklahoma inmate plans to seek a stay of execution after Reed Smith released a report on its independent investigation of the case, undertaken pro bono at the request of a bipartisan group of more than 30 state lawmakers.

Is prison time a possibility under restrictive abortion laws? One state authorizes life sentences for medical doctors

State abortion restrictions that could take effect if Roe v. Wade is overturned call for a variety of punishments for doctors, including a sentence of up to life in prison in one state.

Supreme Court won’t hear challenges to mandatory state bars

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to hear challenges to mandatory state bar associations in Michigan, Oklahoma and Texas.

Oklahoma seeks death penalty against former lawyer and client in triple murder

Prosecutors in Oklahoma are seeking the death penalty against a former criminal defense lawyer and her former client for allegedly murdering three people.

Judging Jurisdiction

In July 2020 when U.S. Supreme Court Justice Neil M. Gorsuch read the majority opinion in McGirt v. Oklahoma, Assistant U.S. Attorney Shannon Cozzoni sprang into action. In that moment, she knew what would happen next: Scores of major crime cases would be landing in her federal court district in Tulsa, requiring rapid adjustments and recalibration.

Many federal courts ease mask requirements; judges often retain discretion in their courtrooms

More than a dozen federal courts have eased or dropped mask requirements since the beginning of March.

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