Public Health

514 ABA Journal Public Health articles.

COVID-19 sparks rapid tech adoption that has helped lawyers weather economic downturn
COVID-19 has sparked lawyers to adopt technology at a much faster clip than previously seen in the legal industry and ahead of consumer expectations for doing so, according to cloud-based company Clio’s 2020 Legal Trends Report.
SCOTUS nominee Barrett says she’s not ‘hostile’ to the Affordable Care Act
U.S. Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett said during her confirmation hearing Tuesday she is not "hostile" to the Affordable Care Act or to any statute passed by Congress.
Democrats at Barrett confirmation hearing focus on health law, even as they label proceedings a ‘sham’
Democrats focused on the Affordable Care Act in their opening statements Monday morning at the confirmation hearing for Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett.
Baker Botts lays off 50 staff members, citing workplace shift created by COVID-19 pandemic
Baker Botts will lay off 50 staff members in office services and secretarial services, the law firm confirmed Thursday.
SCOTUS declines to reinstate medication-abortion requirement; dissent sees ‘unusual disposition’
The U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday declined to reinstate a federal requirement for women seeking medication abortions to pick up the pill at a hospital, clinic or medical office.
Afternoon Briefs: DOJ admits sticky note mistake; DA’s wife-hiring plot conviction mostly overturned

Scanned sticky notes on Michael Flynn documents altered dates, DOJ admits

The Department of Justice has acknowledged that FBI agents’ sticky notes weren’t removed from documents before they were scanned…

Afternoon Briefs: Top DOJ officials backed family separations; judge forgives gunman who killed her son

Top DOJ officials said to be ‘driving force’ in family separations

Former U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions and his deputy attorney general, Rod Rosenstein, told federal prosecutors in 2018 that…

Sheppard Mullin lays off staffers as it restores pay
Lawyers and staff members at Sheppard, Mullin, Richter & Hampton will be getting full paychecks and make-whole payments for money withheld because of the COVID-19 pandemic.
Afternoon Briefs: Property law scholar wins ‘genius grant;’ judge says inmates entitled to stimulus checks

Law prof who studied Black land ownership wins ‘genius grant’

Thomas Wilson Mitchell, a law professor at the Texas A&M University, is the only lawyer among 21 winners of the…

Judge reprimanded for apparent KKK reference when complaining about court mask mandate
A Tennessee judge has received a public reprimand for complaining that the state supreme court’s “grand wizard” required that masks be worn in court.
Supreme Court reinstates witness requirement for mail-in ballots in South Carolina
The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday reinstated a South Carolina requirement for voters who use mail-in ballots to obtain the signature of a witness.
Michigan governor exceeded her authority to issue COVID-19 orders, state’s top court rules
Michigan’s attorney general will no longer criminally prosecute those who violate COVID-19 executive orders after the state supreme court ruled Friday that Gov. Gretchen Whitmer exceeded her authority by issuing them.
Afternoon Briefs: SCOTUS moves quickly in census case; judge stops policing commission work

Supreme Court expedites case on census count

The U.S. Supreme Court is moving quickly in a case challenging President Donald Trump’s decision to exclude from the census count immigrants who…

SCOTUS is back in session amid a loss, a heated election and a world health crisis

The U.S. Supreme Court reconvenes for its new term on Oct. 5 with grief in the air after the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, a confirmation battle and election controversies swirling all around it and the court’s operations still disrupted by the pandemic.

Chemerinsky: The Supreme Court returns to a term like no other
No other first Monday in October, the traditional start of a new U.S. Supreme Court term, ever has been like this one. With the country still in the midst of a pandemic, oral arguments will be held by telephone as they were in May. The justices and the country are still reeling from the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Sept. 18. Looming large is the coming confirmation battle over the nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett, who would add another staunch conservative to the court.

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