Public Health

622 ABA Journal Public Health articles.

COVID-19 spurred more than a thousand workplace lawsuits in 2020, class action report says
At least 1,005 workplace lawsuits filed in 2020 stemmed from the COVID-19 pandemic, and more are expected in 2021, according to Seyfarth Shaw’s 17th Annual Workplace Class Action Litigation Report.
There will be blood: COVID-19, coup d’etat and capital punishment

As America is left reeling from the violent insurrection at the U.S. Capitol, the infamous last days of Donald J. Trump’s presidency will be remembered for lawlessness, incitement and a…

COVID-19 causes Federal Circuit to cancel arguments in Nintendo case
The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit has canceled oral arguments in Nintendo’s case over its Wii gaming systems after its opposing counsel contracted COVID-19.
BigLaw firm expands presence in Midwest with latest merger
Cincinnati-based Dinsmore & Shohl started the new year by announcing that it acquired Wooden McLaughlin, a 47-attorney firm that has offices in three Indiana cities.
Chief Justice Roberts praises judiciary for post-pandemic performance
“For the past 10 months, it has been all hands on deck for the courts, as our branch of government confronted the COVID-19 pandemic,” U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. wrote in his year-end report on the federal judiciary.
Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, legal services providers find creative ways to serve older adults

Many legal services providers have worked in the past year to change how they reach and assist their clients, particularly those who are older and at higher risk for developing more severe cases of COVID-19. While some created or expanded their partnerships with community organizations, others moved their services online or outdoors.

Big changes for bar exam suggested by NCBE testing task force
Bar exams of the future should be delivered online as an integrated test with scenarios to answer questions from, rather than in, sections with different formats, according to preliminary recommendations released Monday by the National Conference of Bar Examiners’ testing task force.
What types of lawsuits were filed over COVID-19 in 2020?
Despite predictions made in the early months of the coronavirus pandemic, lawsuits alleging that COVID-19 caused physical or economic harm were limited in 2020.
Federal appeals court reinstates execution date for only woman on death row

The execution date for the only woman on federal death row has been reinstated by a three-judge panel for the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. The panel held that the court erred when it vacated the date for Lisa Montgomery.

Ethics attorneys hopeful COVID-19 will prompt changes in remote working rules

The continued spread of COVID-19 has resulted in lawyers across the country working remotely for months on end, including in jurisdictions where they are not licensed to practice law. While this trend prioritizes public health and provides workers with increased flexibility, it could also raise ethical issues for some attorneys.

Will paper bar exams become a thing of the past?

While there’s significant disagreement on how the bar exam should change, many believe it will, and there’s a wide range of ideas about what should happen.

Chemerinsky: Predicting the Supreme Court in 2021 may be dangerous and futile

At the end of 2019, law dean Erwin Chemerinsky attempted to look ahead to what to expect in the U.S. Supreme Court in 2020. He’s sure 2021 will be no different in its unpredictability. Here are some things to look for at the high court in the year ahead.

Second half of SCOTUS term may bring the temperature down compared to its feverish first

The U.S. Supreme Court justices may soon be able to settle in for some relative peace and quiet in the second half of their term. Decisions in several high-profile merits cases are being drafted and circulated.

10 New Year’s resolutions lawyers can make for resilience in 2021

Now is the time when people usually think about changes they can make to improve their lives—otherwise known as New Year’s resolutions. You can choose one or all of these 10 resolutions; it depends on how much you want to change your life.

What it’s like to argue before the Supreme Court during COVID-19
Jeffrey L. Fisher has argued more than 40 U.S. Supreme Court cases, and he relies heavily on the justices’ body language during arguments. But that wasn’t possible for his last three, which were conducted by phone because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

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