ABA Journal

Public Health

917 ABA Journal Public Health articles.

Weekly Briefs: Bias suit against Trump lawyer resolved; Montana no longer defies court order over birth certificates

Trump lawyer resolves rap-music bias suit

Alina Habba, a lawyer for former President Donald Trump, has resolved a race- and gender-bias lawsuit largely based on the rap music that she…

Montana defies judge’s order to allow transgender people to change birth certificates, at least for now

The Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services is refusing, for now, to go along with a judge’s order to allow transgender people to change their birth certificates.

Texas Supreme Court’s advisory committee supports rule allowing judicial approval of abortions for minors

An advisory committee for the Texas Supreme Court voted unanimously Friday to support a state rule that allows judges to authorize abortions for minors without their parents’ consent.

Patient who received negligent reproductive health care can recover all damages, state supreme court rules

The Washington Supreme Court ruled Thursday that judges in Washington are permitted to award extraordinary damages in “wrongful life” cases.

Federal judge orders 3 pharmacy chains to pay over $650M for role in opioid epidemic

CVS, Walmart and Walgreens must pay $650.6 million to two Ohio counties after contributing to the opioid epidemic, a federal judge said Wednesday.

2 top state courts issue conflicting rulings over abortion restrictions

The Montana Supreme Court on Aug. 9 upheld a lower court decision that temporarily blocked three separate laws that restrict abortion. Meanwhile, the Idaho Supreme Court declined to stop a near-total abortion ban Friday.

In wake of Dobbs, ABA advocates for abortion, same-sex marriage and contraceptive rights

In the first meeting of the ABA House of Delegates since the Dobbs decision came down from the U.S. Supreme Court, delegates voted in favor of a slate of resolutions to protect abortion rights, contraceptive access and same-sex and interracial marriage.

Only half of class of 2018 law grads practice in law firms, NALP report finds

Ninety-seven percent of surveyed law graduates from the class of 2018 were employed, but only 51% were working in law firms, according to a joint study by the National Association for Law Placement and the NALP Foundation.

Top California court will consider employer liability for take-home COVID-19 infections

The California Supreme Court has agreed to decide whether state law permits lawsuits against employers when workers contract COVID-19 and bring the virus home to relatives.

Scott Schoettes has ‘personal stake’ in work for individuals living with HIV/AIDS

In a landmark ruling in April, the Department of Defense was ordered to stop discriminating against people with HIV and permit them to deploy and commission as military officers. Scott Schoettes represented the two plaintiffs who brought the suit, a case with personal meaning for him as an attorney living with HIV.

Federal judge orders US to keep in place Title 42 immigrant ousters tied to pandemic

A federal judge in Louisiana on Friday ordered the Biden administration to keep in place a Trump administration order that required immigrants seeking asylum to be quickly turned back.

Judges’ retreat apparently became superspreader event; karaoke said to be one of the activities

Twenty out of 70-plus New York City judges who attended a retreat in the Hamptons last week tested positive for COVID-19 in the days that followed.

How to drive law department transformation through legal operations

Ari Kaplan recently spoke with Mike Haven, the head of legal operations at Intel and the president of the Corporate Legal Operations Consortium.

There’s modest improvement in law student perceptions of distance learning, new report finds

Law student satisfaction with online learning increased in the past year, but there are still gaps when compared with in-person classes, including participation, according to a report released Wednesday by Gallup and the AccessLex Institute.

Judge’s COVID-19 protocols violated defendant’s right to a public trial, 9th Circuit rules

A federal appeals court ruled Monday that a defendant’s Sixth Amendment right to a public trial was violated when a trial judge allowed an audio stream but not video access to the proceedings.

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