Religious Law

483 ABA Journal Religious Law articles.

6th Circuit rules Kentucky church can host in-person services; federal judge allows it statewide
The 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals at Cincinnati ruled Saturday that the Maryville Baptist Church in Louisville, Kentucky, may host in-person church services while an appeal of its case is pending.
Kentucky can’t ban drive-in church services if health precautions are followed, 6th Circuit says
The Maryville Baptist Church in Louisville, Kentucky, may host drive-in services despite orders by Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear that ban mass gatherings and require the closure of all businesses that are not “life-sustaining,” a federal appeals court ruled Saturday.
Chemerinsky: It’s going to be an unusual May in the Supreme Court
For the first time in recent memory, the Supreme Court will be holding oral arguments in May, and for the first time ever, they will be by telephone. Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, oral arguments were canceled in the Supreme Court in March and April.
AG Barr says Justice Department may support lawsuits if states go too far in COVID-19 constraints
U.S. Attorney General William Barr said Tuesday the Department of Justice will consider supporting lawsuits when states go too far in restricting commerce and civil liberties in the fight against COVID-19.
Kansas Supreme Court upholds order limiting church services to 10 people or less
On Saturday, the Kansas Supreme Court upheld Kansas Gov. Laura Kelly’s order limiting church services to 10 people or less.
Closure orders spark lawsuits from NRA, anti-abortion protesters and others
Across the nation, business owners, the National Rifle Association, would-be churchgoers and anti-abortion protesters are among the plaintiffs suing over state shutdown orders.
Megachurch pastor is arrested for hosting Sunday services despite order limiting gatherings
A megachurch pastor in Florida has been arrested for defying Hillsborough County’s limit on gatherings of 10 or more people.
Afternoon Briefs: Student loan deferment in stimulus bill; BigLaw lawyer removed from ventilator

Federal stimulus package extends student loan payment deferments for 6 months

Under the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act, borrowers can now suspend federal student loan payments until Sept.…

Chemerinsky: Religion comes to the Supreme Court
Among the many divisive questions on the high court's docket this term, there are four different matters concerning religious freedom. Some involve constitutional issues, while others involve interpretation of federal statutes. All involve issues concerning free exercise of religion and are likely to be a strong indication of the direction of the Roberts Court as to religious liberties.
Afternoon Briefs: Sotomayor sees ‘pall of uncertainty’ in capital case; judge backs park proselytizing

Death-row inmate’s conviction has ‘pall of uncertainty,’ Sotomayor says

Justice Sonia Sotomayor expressed concern on Monday about a “pall of uncertainty” over the conviction of Texas death-row inmate Rodney Reed.

Supreme Court to consider case of Catholic foster-care agency that won’t place children with LGBT couples
The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday agreed to decide whether Philadelphia can exclude Catholic Social Services from the city’s foster-care program because the agency doesn’t place children with same-sex couples.
Afternoon Briefs: SCOTUS lacks State of the Union majority; judge reverses No More Deaths convictions

Which Supreme Court justices attended the State of the Union?

Only four justices attended the State of the Union on Tuesday. Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. was there, even…

Some lawyers worry about proposed DOE rule that would remove restrictions on religious institutions

President Donald Trump announced this month that his administration would make it easier for public school students and teachers to pray on campus and would remove federal funding restrictions for religious groups that provide social services.

Sex offender’s quest for ‘Better Off Dead’ name change bites the dust in appeals court
A man who was civilly committed as a sexually dangerous person can’t change his name to “Better Off Dead,” the Minnesota Court of Appeals has ruled.
Chemerinsky: It’s likely to be an amazing year in the Supreme Court
No U.S. Supreme Court term in recent memory has had more potential blockbuster cases on the docket than this one. The court is likely to dominate the headlines in May, and especially June 2020, with rulings on almost every major controversial area of law.

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