Sentencing/Post Conviction

4093 ABA Journal Sentencing/Post Conviction articles.

Law grad who flunked bar exam gets prison time for creating law firms and practicing law
A 2014 graduate of the Stetson University College of Law was sentenced to prison time Wednesday for practicing law even though she flunked the bar exam twice.
Federal inmate tried by all-white jury is executed after Supreme Court lifts execution stay
Federal death-row inmate Orlando Hall was executed Thursday after the U.S. Supreme Court lifted an execution stay issued by a federal judge who said the government needed a prescription for the execution drug.
Afternoon Briefs: COVID-19 cited in halt to execution; ‘not qualified’ Jones Day associate confirmed to bench

Judge delays execution after lawyers contract COVID-19

U.S. District Judge Randolph Moss has delayed the federal execution of Lisa Montgomery because her lawyers contracted COVID-19 after visiting her in prison.…

2 justices dissent over Supreme Court’s refusal to restore COVID-19 safety steps at ‘tinderbox’ prison
The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday denied a request by two older inmates at a Texas geriatric prison to reinstate a judge’s order requiring COVID-19 safety measures.
Afternoon Briefs: Sherrilyn Ifill among winners of this award; app automates expungement

Sherrilyn Ifill among Spirit of Excellence winners

Sherrilyn Ifill, president of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, is one of five winners of the 2021 Spirit of Excellence…

Afternoon Briefs: Judge requires report disclaimer; $2.1B baby powder verdict allowed to stand

Judge requires disclaimer in cop commission report

U.S. District Judge John Bates of the District of Columbia has said President Donald Trump’s national commission on policing can’t release a report…

Afternoon Briefs: Latham will pay fall bonuses; Reagan shooter may display artwork, judge rules

Latham will pay fall bonuses, donate $1M to fight hunger

Latham & Watkins has announced that it will pay fall bonuses ranging from $7,500 to $40,000—the market scale for law…

Prisoner wins parole after getting life sentence for trying to steal hedge clippers in 1997
A Louisiana man sentenced to life in prison for trying to steal hedge clippers was granted parole Thursday after spending more than 20 years in prison for the crime.
ABA Criminal Justice Section reflects on its first 100 years

As April Frazier Camara celebrates the 100th anniversary of the ABA’s Criminal Justice Section, she also looks forward to facing the many challenges she sees in the criminal legal system. “Racial injustice is something that is on the minds and hearts of American people,” says Camara, the chair of the section.

Afternoon Briefs: Another BigLaw firm pays special bonuses; judge charged with stealing campaign funds

Willkie Farr will pay special bonuses

Willkie Farr & Gallagher has announced that it will be paying special bonuses ranging from $7,500 to $40,000, falling in line with a scale…

Judge steps down after newspaper asks about sexual assault allegations
Judge Truman Morrison III of Washington, D.C., retired in March only three days after the Washington Post asked him about a woman’s allegations that he had sexual contact with her when she was 16 years old.
Oregon and Louisiana grapple with past criminal convictions made with split verdicts

In April, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Ramos v. Louisiana that split verdicts in state trials for serious criminal offenses violated the Sixth Amendment right to a fair trial, overturning a high court ruling in 1972 that upheld them. The effect of the court’s ruling in Ramos is that state courts will now vacate cases with split verdicts on direct appeal. Prosecutors will next decide whether to retry them. What is unclear is whether the ruling will apply retroactively.

How losing RBG could shape criminal justice for years to come

Juvenile lifers, victims of police misconduct and immigrants convicted of minor crimes are among those with a lot at stake before the changing court

Is Trump trying to stack prison-sentencing agency with right-wing allies before the election?
President Donald Trump has quietly nominated a slate of tough-on-crime former prosecutors to run a powerful agency that writes the sentencing rules for the entire federal prison system.
Afternoon Briefs: Justice Ginsburg will lie in state; 2 lawyers are sentenced in extortion plot

Justice Ginsburg will be first woman to lie in state at Capitol

The late U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg will lie in repose at the top of the…

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