The Modern Law Library

143 ABA Journal The Modern Law Library articles.

How to develop your horse sense with equine law

In this new episode of the Modern Law Library podcast, Julie Fershtman introduces Ashley Alfirevic of ABA Publishing to the world of horse sense and the liabilities of pony rides.

What should you read about COVID-19? We asked an epidemiologist

With a barrage of information and misinformation about COVID-19, it can be hard to evaluate what sources are trustworthy and where to go for reliable medical news. So for this new episode of the Modern Law Library, we spoke to an epidemiologist.

How to achieve vocal power in and out of the courtroom
Public speaking is a crucial part of working as a lawyer. It is especially important for female lawyers who are claiming their vocal authority in speaking roles in courts.
2 families connected by LA riots collide in ‘Your House Will Pay’

The 1992 riots in South Los Angeles may be nearly three decades old. But in the present day, two families will find the events from that time are far from over. Lee Rawles talks to author Steph Cha in this new episode of the Modern Law Library.

How safe is your right to vote?

A book by a University of Baltimore law prof tells the story of historical efforts of voter suppression and the modern-day dangers that face voters now. In this new episode of the Modern Law Library, Gilda R. Daniels talks to Lee Rawles.

The court of public opinion: Why litigation PR is a critical component of a case

A lawyer’s duties do not begin and end at the courtroom door. They extend beyond to the proverbial court of public opinion. As a lawyer and PR consultant, James F. Haggerty has shared how to properly handle the media aspects of litigation in his new book.

How to kick off 2020 with more productive business meetings
When considering our New Year’s resolutions, we all want to be more resourceful with our time, especially with our workdays. We don’t realize how much time meetings can take up if they are conducted in an inefficient manner.
Listen to our 10 favorite podcast episodes of 2019
Looking for a new listen? We've picked our favorite 2019 episodes from each of the ABA Journal's three podcasts. And if this whets your appetite, you can find more than nine years of past episodes on our podcast page or your favorite podcast listening service.
Check out our favorite books of 2019
If you're traveling this holiday season—or just enjoying some end-of-year downtime—you might be in need of some good book recommendations. With that in mind, in this episode of the Modern Law Library, the ABA Journal's Lee Rawles brings you a glimpse at what we've been reading around the ABA offices. Staff recommendations run the gamut from romance to horror to self-help to historical fiction.
What goes on in the mind of a sentencing judge?

A new book by Judge Frederic Block gives a behind-the-scenes look at a judge’s thoughts and feelings when imposing punishments. Block is candid and self-reflective in the book and also wonders where the line should be drawn in exercising judicial powers.

One year after Kavanaugh’s confirmation, reporters reexamine the evidence for and against him
One year after Brett M. Kavanaugh's tumultuous nomination to the U.S. Supreme Court, questions that arose during the nomination hearings still linger.
How to master the jury selection process

In this new Modern Law Library episode, Olivia Aguilar of ABA Publishing talks to Jeffrey T. Frederick, an expert on jury selection strategies, about benefits of open-ended questioning, how to break the ice with a conversational tone, and more.

Fighting for first responders sickened at ground zero turned into yearslong legal battle

In the new episode of the Modern Law Library, William Groner talks to Lee Rawles about co-writing his book, the challenge of “being ahead of the science,” and how political interests worsened one of the largest environmental disasters in history.

New book addresses critical legal issues, policies and strategies surrounding smart technology

In this new episode of the Modern Law Library, Olivia Aguilar of ABA Publishing speaks with Cynthia H. Cwik about why “internet of things” devices are some of the most vulnerable hacker targets and the impact of these devices on national security.

African American farmer’s legal battle to save his family farm is focus of ‘Catfish Dream’
Ed Scott was the first-ever nonwhite owner and operator of a catfish plant in the nation. The former sharecropper-turned-landowner was part of a class action lawsuit that resulted in one of the largest civil rights settlements in U.S. history. With the settlement of Pigford v. Glickman in 1999, almost $1 billion has been issued to more than 13,000 African American farmers to date.

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