ABA Journal

Columns

Advocating for human rights for workers around the world is part of the ABA's mission

Next time you put on that top fashion-brand garment made in Bangladesh, consider the workers who produced it. Are they still alive, despite wages below poverty level and unsafe working conditions? Or have some been killed or injured in a factory collapse or fire, or in an attempt to…



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Sports gamblers tried their luck with courts long before betting became legal

The National Football League just kicked off its new season. The opening week’s games were played against a backdrop of widespread legalized sports wagering. The Wall Street Journal recently reported that the activity, which is permissible in 32 states and the District of Columbia, is poised to generate revenue of about $4 billion in the U.S. this year.


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For immigration law, a perfect storm creates challenges and opportunities for firms

Three key developments are driving a dramatic increase in U.S. immigration activity in 2021. As a result, immigration law firms are bracing for a huge influx of cases. In this rapidly evolving practice area, technology and process automation are increasingly important for immigration attorneys seeking to meet the challenge.


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Do lawyers make simple things difficult?

Do we lawyers always complicate matters a bit too much? Sometimes? Are we windbags? Do we waste too much time on trivialities?


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Join the Student Debt Week of Action

New attorneys, like other professionals across the country, are struggling under the weight of their student loan debt. They need our help to urge Congress and the Biden Administration to provide much-needed relief. That is why the ABA is hosting a Student Debt Week of Action from September 20-24 and…



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'Framing Britney Spears' examines the singer's conservatorship

Social media is a blessing and a curse. We are at a point in human civilization where it’s never been easier to communicate with each other. Whether via Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Snapchat or any other platform, we have reached a position in our society where it arguably takes little to no effort to correspond with loved ones, those we despise and everything in between.


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The eudaimonic turn: How we can help lawyers flourish

The humanities encompass domains such as music, art, literature, culture, religion, languages, philosophy, history and law. Each represents rich opportunities for individuals and communities to explore and nurture positive ideas, feelings and behaviors that contribute to human flourishing. To that end, an interesting initiative called the “positive humanities,” an interdisciplinary collaboration between the field of positive psychology and the humanities, is evolving.


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Chemerinsky: The Supreme Court has done a poor job protecting against police abuse of power and racism

Following the death of George Floyd, the nation focused attention on the enormous problems of police violence and racism in law enforcement, but there is a failure to put blame where much belongs: on the United States Supreme Court.


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Amid judicial reform debates, racial and ethnic justice interests remain significant

In July’s Brnovich v. Democratic National Committee decision, the Supreme Court upheld a measure that imposed restrictions on voting rights in Arizona, a battleground state in general elections. The ruling has significant implications for racial, ethnic and religious minority communities and the nation more broadly.


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Track your firm’s litigation deadlines with rules-based calendaring software

Practicing law in the midst of a worldwide pandemic isn’t easy. For the past year and a half, legal professionals have struggled to adapt to their newfound reality of virtual court appearances, online meetings and remote work.


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