ABA Journal

Columns

Bestselling author David Baldacci shares words of wisdom for lawyers who want to be novelists

“I can’t tell you how many events I’ve gone to,” David Baldacci says, “and [lawyers] come up to me and say, ‘Oh my god, you broke out of jail! Congratulations!’”


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'The Vanished' and the need for closure

I’m a big fan of podcasts. I’ve previously written about one I listen to daily, along with another genre-defining series I haven’t followed quite as frequently. I listen to podcasts in the morning while I stretch and organize my thoughts for the day, and I often listen to them at work while I type.


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Chemerinsky: An important week of arguments in the Supreme Court

Next Monday and Wednesday, the Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in two of the most important cases of the term. Each could have enormous implications for future litigation and for constitutional law.


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For 2023, which tech tools might help your firm flourish?

The end of the year is a great time to review your law firm’s achievements and challenges, so you can determine needs moving forward.


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For mobile data collections, product business manager is 'looking forward to the needle moving forward'

Ari Kaplan recently spoke with Monica Harris, a product business manager for Cellebrite, a digital intelligence software company that provides tools to collect, review, analyze and manage digital data for law enforcement agencies, enterprises and providers of services.


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The legal dilemma of 'The Wizard of Oz'

“I’ll get you, my pretty, and your little dog, too!” One of my favorite movies is The Wizard of Oz. I rewatched the film recently, and this time, I focused on a scene with great legal significance.


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Chemerinsky: Stakes are high as Supreme Court considers affirmative action cases

The future of affirmative action in the United States rests on two cases heard by the U.S Supreme Court Monday: Students for Fair Admissions v. University of North Carolina and Students for Fair Admission v. Harvard College. Both liberals and conservatives expect the court to overrule precedent and end affirmative action by colleges and universities. This will have a dramatic effect on both public and private schools, and how the court does this could have enormous implications for many areas of law.


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How to get more clients from the comfort of home

In a passage from Ernest Hemingway’s novel, The Sun Also Rises, Scottish war veteran Mike Campbell is asked how he found himself after going bankrupt. His response: “Two ways. Gradually and then suddenly.”


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Astros cheat, lawyers prosper and fans strike out in sign-stealing scandal

On Friday night, the Houston Astros will go to bat against the Philadelphia Phillies in Game 1 of baseball’s Fall Classic. For many, this will call back Major League Baseball’s finding in 2020 that the Astros engaged in illegal sign-stealing during the 2017 and 2018 seasons.


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Innovation and law firm digital transformation in Europe

Ari Kaplan recently spoke with Freddie Hustler, the head of international sales at Litera, a software company that provides document lifecycle, deal management and firm intelligence solutions to the legal profession.


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