ABA Journal

ABA Journal

3006 ABA Journal ABA Journal articles.

Waiting to exhale: The ill effects of technology on legal practice

At my law school 50th reunion earlier this year—by Zoom, of course—several of us with careers in large law firms compared notes. We spent the expected amount of time reflecting on how much law practice has changed over the past half century.

How LinkedIn can help lawyers develop and market their brands

How do you use LinkedIn? Do you see it as a static resumé, or is it the equivalent of your morning newspaper? For Marc W. Halpert, LinkedIn is the most effective way lawyers and other professionals can build their brand, display expertise in niche markets, and nurture business relationships.

Amid judicial reform debates, racial and ethnic justice interests remain significant

In July’s Brnovich v. Democratic National Committee decision, the Supreme Court upheld a measure that imposed restrictions on voting rights in Arizona, a battleground state in general elections. The ruling has significant implications for racial, ethnic and religious minority communities and the nation more broadly.

Track your firm’s litigation deadlines with rules-based calendaring software

Practicing law in the midst of a worldwide pandemic isn’t easy. For the past year and a half, legal professionals have struggled to adapt to their newfound reality of virtual court appearances, online meetings and remote work.

Tara Isa Koslov brings passion for antitrust law to the ABA

As a kid growing up in Brooklyn, Koslov thought she might pursue a career in journalism. That changed after Koslov saw a gunman shoot and wound her father as they walked together near their home in 1983. “My dad was such a good writer and communicator, but he was not a lawyer, so he was dependent on the lawyers to tell his story,” she says. “I thought, ‘I like to speak, and I love to write. Maybe I need to focus my skills in that direction instead.’”

What lawyers can learn from self-love

Many attorneys struggle to realize that they can’t love their work or anyone else until they love themselves. Even now, we can’t seem to fully embrace this concept, writes lawyer James Gray Robinson.

New CEO of IP law firm talks dynamic leadership with client-centric insight

Ari Kaplan recently spoke with Raymond Millien, the new CEO of Harness, Dickey & Pierce, an intellectual property boutique firm with four offices and headquarters in suburban Detroit.

This online platform aims to help pro se litigants with complex civil cases

Unlike many other technological tools for pro se litigants, its creators say Courtroom5 is particularly well suited to help people with complex civil matters and can be utilized by consumers nationwide.

Top 4 unexpected culture killers for post-COVID-19 hybrid work

While individual schedules will vary, on any given day, firms will have a segment of their team in the office, and another segment dispersed. After more than a full year of working remotely, this will be yet another disruption for law firms to endure.

Stoicism and the legal profession: Refraining from being quarrelsome

I graduated from the University of Oklahoma with a degree in philosophy, focusing on the East Asian and ancient varieties. I loved my course studies, and I’ve stayed engaged in the art of self-examination, to a certain degree, ever since.

How neurodiverse lawyers can thrive in the profession—and change it for the better

There's a business case to be made for hiring attorneys with ADHD, autism, learning disabilities and other neurological differences. Businesses have long touted out-of-the-box thinking, but cookie-cutter hiring practices don't tend to result in diversity of thought. A legal professional who quite literally thinks differently can be an invaluable part of a team.

Law student who sees ‘healing and beauty’ in writing wins ABA Journal’s 2021 Ross essay contest for legal fiction

A law student in Tennessee is the winner of the 2021 ABA Journal/Ross Writing Contest for Legal Short Fiction.

What does it mean for a lawyer to retire?

As my hair started turning salt-and-peppery, the most common question I faced was, “Are you retired from practice yet?” The second most common was, “When do you plan to retire?” But what does it mean for a lawyer to retire? What changes?

Chemerinsky: The SCOTUS sleeper cases of the October 2020 term

The U.S. Supreme Court’s October 2020 term, which ended on July 1, had major rulings that attracted media attention, such as its narrow interpretation of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 and its ruling expanding the protections of the free exercise clause of the First Amendment. There also were some cases that attracted relatively little attention but that have the potential to have significant effects on the work of lawyers and judges throughout the country. Here are two of them.

The Chauvin conviction shows why diverse juries matter

When it comes to convicting police officers, clear and convincing evidence is only half the battle. But evidence—visual, circumstantial, forensic—has historically been irrelevant when a police officer is on trial, with law enforcement often accorded the benefit of the doubt and acquitted.

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