ABA Journal

2683 ABA Journal ABA Journal articles.

What should you read about COVID-19? We asked an epidemiologist

With a barrage of information and misinformation about COVID-19, it can be hard to evaluate what sources are trustworthy and where to go for reliable medical news. So for this new episode of the Modern Law Library, we spoke to an epidemiologist.

Judges must consider defendants’ ability to pay fines and fees, ethics opinion says
Judges must take steps to ensure individuals have the ability to pay before threatening incarceration, revoking probation, exercising contempt powers and similar conduct, says a recent ethics opinion from the ABA’s Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility.
5 red flags that a client might be a victim of elder abuse

The ABA Journal spoke with elder law attorneys about how to identify some red flags or signs of elder abuse when they’re meeting with clients and how to respond to them.

President of the Legal Services Corp. reflects on his tenure

Asked to reflect on his nine-year tenure as president of the Legal Services Corp., Jim Sandman says he is proud of many things that he and his team accomplished. In this new Legal Rebels Podcast episode, he speaks with the ABA Journal’s Victor Li.

Robert Saunooke champions Native American issues in his career and in the ABA

The universe unfolds as it is intended. That’s the mantra Robert Saunooke has called on for motivation through much of his life. It guided the citizen and enrolled member of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians through challenges he encountered during his childhood and opportunities he embraced as he built a practice focused on representing Native American tribes and their members.

How to achieve vocal power in and out of the courtroom
Public speaking is a crucial part of working as a lawyer. It is especially important for female lawyers who are claiming their vocal authority in speaking roles in courts.
Faegre Drinker temporarily closes all its offices after visitor tests positive for COVID-19

Updated: Faegre Drinker Biddle & Reath said Wednesday it has reopened nearly all of its 22 offices after closing them Tuesday amid coronavirus concerns.

The law firm said it decided…

2 families connected by LA riots collide in ‘Your House Will Pay’

The 1992 riots in South Los Angeles may be nearly three decades old. But in the present day, two families will find the events from that time are far from over. Lee Rawles talks to author Steph Cha in this new episode of the Modern Law Library.

Why did a Georgia city prohibit tattoos on Sundays?
These days, people from all walks of life get tattoos. But in Columbus, Georgia, it was illegal to give them on Sundays, until recently. No one knows for sure what led to the law, but some suspect that it was what’s known as a “blue law,” a term for state and municipal regulations that prohibits commerce on Sundays, when lawmakers thought people should be in church.
TrialWatch volunteers are helping secure human rights around the globe

TrialWatch is a global initiative established by the Clooney Foundation for Justice that monitors trials in which there appears to be a risk of fair trial violations.

How 2 Texas lawyers are marketing their practice through song
Thanks to social media and the internet, it’s never been easier—or more affordable—for lawyers to advertise. On the other hand, having so many avenues available to lawyers makes it more difficult for anyone to stand out from the crowd.
How safe is your right to vote?

A book by a University of Baltimore law prof tells the story of historical efforts of voter suppression and the modern-day dangers that face voters now. In this new episode of the Modern Law Library, Gilda R. Daniels talks to Lee Rawles.

Nothing is off-limits for this California bar task force

The group, which laid the groundwork for what could become the largest modern reform to the state’s professional rules potentially set a road map for others around the country.

Thanks to Legal Hackers, hackathons are an important tool for making law more accessible

Conventional wisdom in the legal profession dictates that attorneys should have all the answers, mistakes can be detrimental, and people who call themselves “hackers” are known for identity theft and…

An LSC grant program is trying to increase access to justice through tech

The Technology Initiative Grant Program awards regional LSC offices money for creating technology plans that help low-income people with their legal needs.

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Judge accused of ordering handcuffing, jailing of litigants should be removed, commission says
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Law firms are making the same mistakes with women and millennials, lawyer says
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What should you read about COVID-19? We asked an epidemiologist
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