ABA Journal

2792 ABA Journal ABA Journal articles.

Social justice meets Pro Bono Week: What is your plan?
Thirty-five years ago, I was a know-nothing 25-year-old associate at Shook, Hardy & Bacon, where I still practice, when a senior partner asked me to take a case on behalf of a single parent.
Chemerinsky: SCOTUS considers whether religious freedom also means freedom to discriminate
On Nov. 4, the U.S. Supreme Court again will face one of the country’s most divisive constitutional issues: Does the First Amendment’s protection of speech and religion provide a basis for violating laws that prohibit discrimination against gays and lesbians?
How to make better decisions with litigation analytics software
If you’re a litigator, you know that knowledge is power. The more you know about the court, opposing counsel, expert witnesses, the parties and the judge, the better. This is because more information allows you to make sound, informed decisions to help you achieve a successful end result for your client.
Law firms must do more effective damage control to survive
When I sat down to write this column, my thoughts were interrupted by a mechanical noise coming from my backyard. It was the comforting sound of the weekly “test run” of the generator that keeps our house powered during electrical outages.
How to maximize your business development during the COVID-19 crisis
Plenty of lawyers in private practice worry about business development during the COVID-19 pandemic, but there may be more opportunities to discover new clients than they realize. And that is thanks to an increase in online events, says Karen Kaplowitz, a lawyer and business development coach.
Investment bank managing director discusses legal tech market and lasting impacts of COVID-19
Ari Kaplan recently spoke with Scott Mozarsky, a managing director with the Jordan, Edmiston Group Inc., a middle-market investment bank, where he leads its legal and compliance practice.
Is the law making you fat?  A lawyer and life coach shares her story
Law school taught me many things, but one that stands out for me is this: Chocolate cake reduces stress.
Knowing when to tell your client no and other ethical dilemmas
One of the most important ethical obligations a lawyer has is knowing when to tell their client no. But how do you know when that moment has come, and how do you deal with it?
For minority law students, learning the law can be intellectually violent

It pales in comparison to the structural and physical violence that people experience outside the ivory tower, but it is also unforgiving, can feel unrelenting and often goes unnamed.

Firms of the future: COVID-19 prompts more law firms to pursue real estate downsizing
In recent years, a growing number of law firms reduced their brick-and-mortar office space as a way to cut costs and also better meet the changing workplace needs of their attorneys.
Should juries be feared or revered? Retired lawyer examines their roles
The jury system first scared me at the age of 9. How, you ask? I grew up in Montreal, the son of parents who immigrated from Belgium. My late father was a humble tailor who worked in a factory. One day, we received a letter in the mail. It had an impressive-looking logo of a crown and the scales of justice.
Thanks for nothing: When should lawyers end an email with ‘thank you’?
Writing a professional email is difficult enough. And choosing an appropriate signoff can be daunting, with so many options to choose from: “Thank you” (or just “Thanks”), “Sincerely,” “Best,” “Regards,” “Yours” or nothing at all (as in, “—Jon”). The list goes on.
Voting rights attorney writes a tale of dark money chicanery in ‘The Coyotes of Carthage’
Steven Wright spent several years at the Department of Justice's Voting Section witnessing all manners of election chicanery, voter suppression and dark money campaigns. So when he turned his efforts toward fiction, he decided to write what he knew.
‘On the Basis of Sex’ and remembering Justice Ginsburg
R.I.P., RBG. Here we are again, almost four years from the last time a U.S. Supreme Court Justice died in office. Justice Antonin Scalia passed away in February of 2016, and President Barack Obama nominated Merrick Garland for the vacant position. We all know how that turned out.
‘CSI effect’ remains a myth, retired judge says on 20th anniversary of popular forensic science show

However, Donald Shelton is quick to make clear that the perception of a “CSI effect,” plus ever-evolving technology and social media, are altering the manner in which juries hear and decide cases.

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