ABA Journal

ABA Journal Podcast

407 ABA Journal ABA Journal Podcast articles.

How SCOTUS enabled police abuses of civil rights⁠—and what we can do about it

Much has been said about police officers and departments who violate civil rights or enforce the law in discriminatory ways. But not as much attention has been paid to the ways in which the U.S. Supreme Court has enabled police excesses and insulated police from civil or criminal responsibility, says Erwin Chemerinsky, the dean of the University of California at Berkeley School of Law and author of the new book Presumed Guilty: How the Supreme Court Empowered the Police and Subverted Civil Rights.

Why this BigLaw firm is embracing an ‘augmented automation solution’ for clients

Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati announced last month that it had teamed up with Workiva Inc. to create an application that automates the S-1 form that companies must file with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission when going public.

How has practicing in the Supreme Court changed throughout the years?

This month’s Asked and Answered podcast is looking at how advocacy has changed in the country’s highest court. It’s part of a special series on how lawyers’ work has changed over the years.

How to market your legal services to Hispanic clients

Hispanics are becoming an increasingly large segment of the U.S. population, and for an enterprising lawyer, serving the legal needs of Spanish-speaking clients seems like a solid business development goal. But running your existing marketing materials through Google Translate and slapping "Se habla español" on your website is not enough, says Liel Levy of Nanato Media.

Why an online legal marketplace has added tech companies and other alternative providers

“We are creating a much more connected ecosystem, so that in-house teams can find the right solution in one place,” says Basha Rubin, CEO and co-founder at Priori, who was also a 2018 ABA Journal Legal Rebel.

A tale of love, loss and conservatorships in the Golden Age of Hollywood

Britney Spears' legal battle over the conservatorship that put her under the control of her father brought international attention to the conservatorship system. But many other rich and famous people have—appropriately or not—also found themselves in the grips of a system that is much more easy to enter than to leave.

Following a viral video, Harvard Law School student finds ways to connect remotely

Many Harvard Law School students knew of classmate Rehan Staton through a July 2020 video that went viral, which featured him opening a Harvard Law School acceptance email. There’s a lot more to him than the video, and Staton wanted to connect with classmates more significantly while they attended remote classes over the past year.

How LinkedIn can help lawyers develop and market their brands

How do you use LinkedIn? Do you see it as a static resumé, or is it the equivalent of your morning newspaper? For Marc W. Halpert, LinkedIn is the most effective way lawyers and other professionals can build their brand, display expertise in niche markets, and nurture business relationships.

This online platform aims to help pro se litigants with complex civil cases

Unlike many other technological tools for pro se litigants, its creators say Courtroom5 is particularly well suited to help people with complex civil matters and can be utilized by consumers nationwide.

How neurodiverse lawyers can thrive in the profession—and change it for the better

There's a business case to be made for hiring attorneys with ADHD, autism, learning disabilities and other neurological differences. Businesses have long touted out-of-the-box thinking, but cookie-cutter hiring practices don't tend to result in diversity of thought. A legal professional who quite literally thinks differently can be an invaluable part of a team.

For this lawyer, becoming more flexible was a benefit of the pandemic

Lawyer Patrick Krill learned to be more flexible during the pandemic, with inspiration from Be Water, an ESPN documentary about martial artist and actor Bruce Lee.

Chicago’s lakefront is an accident of history, but can it teach us how to preserve land for public use?

Chicago's lakefront, with its parks, museums, beaches and public spaces, is an accident of history. But can we take lessons from that history to create sustainable and environmentally responsible public spaces?

How one bankruptcy software company had a banner year despite filings hitting a low

When COVID-19 began hitting the United States hard last year, Janine Sickmeyer was among those in the bankruptcy world who thought that there would be a tsunami of cases. But contrary to the prognostications of many, the influx never materialized.

Do we need to rethink how we handle classified leaks?

As the 50th anniversary of the Pentagon Papers case approached, First Amendment scholars Lee Bollinger and Geoffrey Stone knew they wanted to mark the occasion somehow.

Saying yes has been part of this law school dean’s strategy during the COVID-19 pandemic

Leadership involves taking in a variety of viewpoints, says law dean Hari Osofsky, and recognizing what students, professors and administration want is a good way to guarantee people that they are being heard.

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