ABA Journal Podcast

354 ABA Journal ABA Journal Podcast articles.

This Louisiana judge continues to innovate during the COVID-19 crisis
Judge Scott Schlegel’s history of utilizing technology in his Louisiana courtroom to make life easier for attorneys and members of the public has come in very handy during the COVID-19 pandemic.
‘Demagogue’ tells the story of Sen. Joseph McCarthy’s rise and fall
What made 1950s America vulnerable to a man like Joseph McCarthy, a junior senator from Wisconsin? In Demagogue: The Life and Long Shadow of Senator Joe McCarthy, author Larry Tye takes an in-depth look at McCarthy's life.
This law prof has been fighting off Twitter trolls during the coronavirus crisis
While Veena Dubal was adapting to working at home with three young children during the COVID-19 pandemic, the “reply guys” came after the California law professor on Twitter for her support of a 2020 state law that extends employee classification status to gig workers.
6 key numbers that can diagnose the financial health of your law practice
Do you know how many billable hours you can devote to a new case? Or whether you need to add another attorney to your firm? Can you afford to take time off from your practice, and if so, how much? If you're one of the lawyers who is kept up at night with worries about your firm's finances, you are not alone.
Bench trial by video? This lawyer says it went better than expected

Kathy Ehrhart and her firm represented two of three defendants in a civil case focused on alleged breach of contract over a real estate transaction. The video proceedings had some tech challenges, but the overall experience was better than she expected.

Convicted of a crime that never occurred? It happens all too often, law prof says
We are used to hearing about wrongful convictions in which a murderer walked free because an innocent person was misidentified. But when Jessica S. Henry, a professor at Montclair State University in New Jersey, was researching material for her course on wrongful convictions, she discovered that in one-third of all known exonerations, the conviction was wrongful because there had not even been a crime.
2020 Harvard Law grad postpones bar exam and her wedding plans because of COVID-19
This past spring, when few people realized that most July bar exams would ultimately be canceled, Molly Coleman decided to forgo the test, for the time being, despite her lawyer father’s objections.
Well-meaning social reforms created ‘Prison by Any Other Name,’ authors say

In Prison by Any Other Name: The Harmful Consequences of Popular Reforms, authors Maya Schenwar and Victoria Law outline the way that well-meaning movements ended up funneling people into environments where they faced even more punitive measures.

What can we expect from the all-virtual 2020 ABA Annual Meeting?

When COVID-19 closed ABA offices in March, staff sprang into work figuring out how the association could convert its meetings and events to virtual environments. In this bonus episode of…

We need to reckon with feminism’s contributions to mass incarceration, says law professor

As a law professor at the University of Colorado Law School, Aya Gruber has seen her Millennial students wrestle with a problem that she has long struggled with herself: How to fight both gender-based violence and overpolicing.

Legal reform advocates need to more actively engage the public

Supporters of broad reforms to how the legal profession is regulated must do a better job involving the public, says the former longtime executive director of the Washington State Bar.

COVID-19 hasn’t stopped this lawyer from advocating for wellness and recovery
It may often seem like most, if not all, of your contacts on social media are complaining about wearing face masks, having to social distance and adhere to shelter-in-place orders. Since the novel coronavirus hit, performing these tasks have become part of our daily lives. But it's important to note that you only have control of yourself, says lawyer and author Brian Cuban.
What does police abolition look like?

Alex S. Vitale explains the troubling origins of modern policing, why commonly suggested reforms like training and increased diversity have not been successful, and much more.

BigLaw firm’s legal tech subsidiary has launched a steady stream of COVID-19 tools

Utah-based SixFifty set out to do what it does best: develop online tools to assist consumers of all types tackle complex legal challenges without breaking the bank. “That is where we thought we could make the biggest impact,” says CEO Kimball Dean Parker.

What’s lost when jury trials vanish?

With only 2% of federal criminal cases ending up in a jury trial, how can would-be trial lawyers develop their skills? How can citizens participate in the justice system? And how can defendants receive experienced counsel?

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