ABA Journal Podcast

349 ABA Journal ABA Journal Podcast articles.

Online estate planning sees surge during coronavirus crisis

“I think that everybody has a family member who is elderly or has been affected by this or works in health care, so it definitely hits close to home,” says Trust & Will co-founder Cody Barbo in this new episode of the Legal Rebels Podcast.

How to develop your horse sense with equine law

In this new episode of the Modern Law Library podcast, Julie Fershtman introduces Ashley Alfirevic of ABA Publishing to the world of horse sense and the liabilities of pony rides.

How to practice law remotely and efficiently during the COVID-19 crisis
As people across the country are coping with countless changes in light of the novel coronavirus pandemic, the ABA Journal’s Asked and Answered podcast is taking a break from its regularly scheduled programing to share information with lawyers about how they can adjust to the world’s current situation—such as having to work from home, whether they want to or not.
What should you read about COVID-19? We asked an epidemiologist

With a barrage of information and misinformation about COVID-19, it can be hard to evaluate what sources are trustworthy and where to go for reliable medical news. So for this new episode of the Modern Law Library, we spoke to an epidemiologist.

President of the Legal Services Corp. reflects on his tenure

Asked to reflect on his nine-year tenure as president of the Legal Services Corp., Jim Sandman says he is proud of many things that he and his team accomplished. In this new Legal Rebels Podcast episode, he speaks with the ABA Journal’s Victor Li.

How to achieve vocal power in and out of the courtroom
Public speaking is a crucial part of working as a lawyer. It is especially important for female lawyers who are claiming their vocal authority in speaking roles in courts.
2 families connected by LA riots collide in ‘Your House Will Pay’

The 1992 riots in South Los Angeles may be nearly three decades old. But in the present day, two families will find the events from that time are far from over. Lee Rawles talks to author Steph Cha in this new episode of the Modern Law Library.

Why did a Georgia city prohibit tattoos on Sundays?
These days, people from all walks of life get tattoos. But in Columbus, Georgia, it was illegal to give them on Sundays, until recently. No one knows for sure what led to the law, but some suspect that it was what’s known as a “blue law,” a term for state and municipal regulations that prohibits commerce on Sundays, when lawmakers thought people should be in church.
How 2 Texas lawyers are marketing their practice through song
Thanks to social media and the internet, it’s never been easier—or more affordable—for lawyers to advertise. On the other hand, having so many avenues available to lawyers makes it more difficult for anyone to stand out from the crowd.
How safe is your right to vote?

A book by a University of Baltimore law prof tells the story of historical efforts of voter suppression and the modern-day dangers that face voters now. In this new episode of the Modern Law Library, Gilda R. Daniels talks to Lee Rawles.

Getting real: What happens when clients go on reality TV

In this new episode of Asked and Answered, ABA Journal Senior Writer Stephanie Francis Ward speaks with two lawyers and a TV showrunner, who are all involved in the world of reality television.

The court of public opinion: Why litigation PR is a critical component of a case

A lawyer’s duties do not begin and end at the courtroom door. They extend beyond to the proverbial court of public opinion. As a lawyer and PR consultant, James F. Haggerty has shared how to properly handle the media aspects of litigation in his new book.

Reinventing the staid field of legal academic writing
Legal academic publishing isn't synonymous with innovation. The mere mention of it can, for some, bring up repressed memories of the most banal and stuffy aspects of law school. But the Massachusetts Institute of Technology wants to change that.
How to kick off 2020 with more productive business meetings
When considering our New Year’s resolutions, we all want to be more resourceful with our time, especially with our workdays. We don’t realize how much time meetings can take up if they are conducted in an inefficient manner.
The financial costs for firms when women and minority lawyers leave

In this new episode of Asked and Answered, Ripa Rashid of Culture at Work talks to the ABA Journal’s Stephanie Francis Ward about how can firms keep female and minority lawyers from leaving and the potentially high cost if and when they depart.

Read more ...




Web First
Legal billing software can ensure you get paid, even in a pandemic
Original reporting ...
Topics: Career & Practice
State supreme court suspends former judge accused of harboring boyfriend sought in robbery
Complete list of topics ...


Your Voice
10 steps to identify irrational resistance to self-care
Articles and commentary ...
Podcasts
2020 Harvard Law grad postpones bar exam and her wedding plans because of COVID-19
More podcasts ...