ABA Journal

Access to Justice

271 ABA Journal Access to Justice articles.

Afternoon Briefs: LSC could see $600M in 2022 funding; Netflix’s ‘Tiger King’ to receive shorter prison sentence

Legal Services Corp. could receive largest funding increase under new legislation

The House of Representatives Committee on Appropriations approved on Thursday funding legislation that includes $600 million for the Legal…

Lawyer asks to withdraw from nearly 200 indigent-defense cases after state investigation

A prominent defense lawyer in Maine has asked to withdraw from nearly 200 court-appointed cases after the state’s public defense agency opened an investigation into her firm.

Solving civil justice issues in the classroom

“Throughout my time as an access-to-justice scholar, I have noticed a meaningful gap in our collective understanding of the scope of civil justice problems in the United States and of the real work needed to address the access-to-justice crisis.”

Mandatory bar in Texas violates lawyers’ First Amendment rights, 5th Circuit rules

A federal appeals court ruled Friday that the mandatory state bar in Texas violates lawyers’ First Amendment rights because of its political and ideological activities.

Afternoon Briefs: New York City law department hacked; Stanford Law wasn’t involved in fake flyer fracas

New York City law department is hacked

Lawyers in New York City’s law department have no remote access to the the computer system after a computer hack, a spokesperson said…

To increase veterans’ access to legal aid, providers should work with VA, break down ‘silos,’ new report says

Legal aid providers should expand collaboration with programs of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs to help provide comprehensive services for veterans, according to a task force report released Tuesday.

Afternoon Briefs: Controversial remarks by ‘QAnon shaman’ lawyer; progressive district attorney wins primary

Lawyer for ‘QAnon shaman’ says rioters are ‘short-bus people’

Albert Watkins, the lawyer for the accused U.S. Capitol Hill rioter known as the “QAnon Shaman,” told Talking Points Memo…

Success of ABA Day 2021 is a blueprint for year-round advocacy

On April 20 and 21, thousands joined the American Bar Association online during its annual advocacy event, ABA Day, to discuss the need for robust legal aid funding and increased judicial security.

ABA president, other leaders will volunteer for Free Legal Answers

ABA President Patricia Lee Refo will join other leaders from the ABA in volunteering for ABA Free Legal Answers, a virtual legal advice clinic that allows income-eligible users to ask volunteer attorneys civil legal questions.

New PBS documentary shows how one man’s legacy changed the trajectory of American race relations

Individuals and companies reach out to me regularly regarding their new law-related TV projects. Recently, I received an email regarding the new PBS documentary The Blinding of Isaac Woodard, which first aired March 30. I was sent a link to a press preview that gave access to the production prior to its release.

Increasing revenue while cutting down on billable hours? ‘AI for Lawyers’ says it’s possible

As the founders of a company that provides AI-powered contract analysis software, Kira Systems' Noah Waisberg and Alexander Hudek are used to facing skepticism, fear and doubt from attorneys. Will AI steal their jobs? Would using it violate ethics rules? How can it be good for a business model that relies on the billable hour to cut down on the amount of time that it takes to review a contract?

Artificial intelligence has made great inroads, but hasn’t yet increased access to civil justice

With AI using data to improve customer experience in other industries—from banking and retail to consumer electronics and transportation—can it enhance access to justice in civil court?

Several states consider lowering cut scores on bar exam, making it easier to pass

Rhode Island has followed California’s lead in lowering the bar exam cut score to make the test easier to pass, a step that several other states are also considering.

Falling behind on rent could mean jail time in one state, but that could change

Only Arkansas permits criminal consequences for nonpayment of rent—and it has enforced the law during the pandemic. Now, after ProPublica investigated the practice, some legislators want to revoke the statute.

First law firm owned entirely by nonlawyers opens in Utah

Law on Call—touted as the first entirely nonlawyer owned law firm in the United States—is open for business in Utah. Law on Call is operating as a result of legal reforms approved by the Utah Supreme Court in August 2020.

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