ABA Journal

Access to Justice

284 ABA Journal Access to Justice articles.

Top state court rules against public defender who sued ACLU for calling him ‘crooked’

A public defender is a public official who must prove actual malice in his defamation lawsuit against the American Civil Liberties Union for a blog post calling him “crooked,” the Georgia Supreme Court has ruled.

ABA Giving Day is an opportunity ‘to help ensure a just society,’ says ABA president

For the second year, the ABA is asking members to join in its efforts to address significant issues that affect their communities.

ABA Commission on Immigration offers students ‘hands-on’ experience with people in detention

“A lot of people frequent the hotline, so you build a relationship with these callers who are really trying their best to understand the process,” says Emma Yznaga, who was an intern with the ABA Commission on Immigration’s Detention and Legal Orientation Program Information Line for four months.

Weekly Briefs: Britney Spears’ father suspended as conservator; would-be Reagan assassin will be freed of limits

Britney Spears’ father is suspended as conservator

Judge Brenda Penny of Los Angeles on Wednesday suspended Britney Spears’ father, Jamie Spears, from his position as conservator for the pop…

Online dispute resolution promises to increase access to justice, but challenges remain

Court leaders say an online dispute resolution program, known as LA-ODR, is part of their ongoing efforts to enhance access to justice for self-represented litigants through the use of technology. A 2019 California Justice Gap Study found that 55% of Californians at all income levels experienced at least one civil legal problem in their household in the prior year, but nearly 70% of them received no legal assistance.

House’s continuing resolution would give $40M in disaster aid to Legal Services Corp.

A continuing resolution passed by the U.S. House of Representatives on Tuesday would give $40 million in disaster aid to the Legal Services Corp. to support legal aid groups helping low-income Americans affected by extreme weather events.

Gender affects access to courts and treatment in the justice system, Washington state study says

Gender affects the treatment of people in Washington state’s court system, particularly the treatment of women of color, LGBTQ people and women in poverty, according to a report released on…

New York extends eviction protections in wake of SCOTUS decision blocking federal ban

New York has become the first state to extend its eviction moratorium since the U.S. Supreme Court blocked the federal ban on evictions during the COVID-19 pandemic late last month.

Law firms team up to encourage racial equity and economic mobility in the Carolinas

Two dozen BigLaw, regional and local law firms have joined together to form the Carolinas Social Impact Initiative, a new effort that seeks to tackle systemic racism in the region.

Two-thirds of Americans experience legal problems, says new nationwide access-to-justice study

Two-thirds of people across all income levels in the United States experienced at least one legal problem in the past four years, according to a new nationwide justice needs study released Wednesday.

Court backlogs have increased by an average of one-third during the pandemic, new report finds

The average case backlog for state and local courts across the United States increased by about one-third amid the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a report released this month from Thomson Reuters.

Volunteer legal work needed for pending evictions crisis, says ABA president

Millions of households are behind on their rent and think they will be evicted in the next few months, wrote U.S. Attorney General Merrick Garland in an Aug. 30 letter to the legal community calling for volunteer services.

LegalZoom is pursuing an alternative business structure license in Arizona

Obtaining an alternative business structure license would allow LegalZoom to hire attorneys as employees to provide legal advice directly to customers rather than relying on an independent network of lawyers.

LA district attorney’s past drives his push forward for reform

Los Angeles District Attorney George Gascón knows how to cope with controversy. He faced it as police chief in Mesa, Arizona. And as San Francisco’s top prosecutor, he riled law enforcement groups after pushing for a host of reforms. Even so, more than seven months into Gascón’s new job as LA’s top prosecutor, resistance to his policies has reached dizzying peaks.

Afternoon Briefs: LSC could see $600M in 2022 funding; Netflix’s ‘Tiger King’ to receive shorter prison sentence

Legal Services Corp. could receive largest funding increase under new legislation

The House of Representatives Committee on Appropriations approved on Thursday funding legislation that includes $600 million for the Legal…

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