Access to Justice

220 ABA Journal Access to Justice articles.

Utah’s high court proposes nonlawyer ownership of law firms and wide-ranging reforms
The Utah Supreme Court has proposed far-reaching regulatory reforms that would broadly open up the state’s legal marketplace to nonlawyers, including allowing them to own or invest in law firms.
ABE Opportunity Grants support projects focusing on elder law, immigrant rights
For the fourth year in a row, the American Bar Endowment is supporting organizations that focus on addressing the urgent legal needs of underserved communities across the country.
Pandemic power plays: Civil liberties in the time of COVID-19

The power to respond to a public health crisis exists in the U.S. Constitution, state constitutions, regulations and case law. But the way they fit together is not always clear, especially in the wake of a modern-day global crisis.

Is my law firm preparing me for success in the next decade?

Every lawyer, from the solo practitioner to lawyers in large international firms, should ask themselves this question, says lawyer Thomas Aertgeerts. For young lawyers and law students, this is even more important.

Boston law school leads initiative to develop mobile court forms during pandemic crisis

The COVID-19 pandemic has limited access to courts across the country, including in Massachusetts.

ABA Young Lawyers Division establishes national hotline for pandemic-related legal services
Updated: The ABA Young Lawyers Division has created a national hotline to connect those needing legal services during the COVID-19 pandemic through its Disaster Legal Services Program.
Legal aid programs likely to be hard hit by drop in IOLTA funds, group warns
The National Association of IOLTA Programs is sounding the alarm about an expected drop in funds from Interest on Lawyer Trust Accounts and other sources that support legal aid programs.
Cash-register justice: Fees collected from defendants are funding the system

Proponents of bail bond reform argue that bond retention statutes are unconstitutional, unfairly place the cost of criminal justice on the backs of defendants before they have been convicted of any crime, and result in innocent people pleading guilty, many of them indigent.

To increase access to justice, jurisdictions should consider rewriting regulations, ABA House says
Legal reform supporters will keep advocating for California sandbox proposal

Advocates for legal regulatory reform say they are dismayed by the State Bar of California’s recent decision to postpone action on a proposed regulatory sandbox, but they have not given up the fight to convince the bar’s board of trustees to support further exploring the concept.

Afternoon Briefs: ABA backs COVID-19 money for LSC; Larry Klayman files $20T suit against China

ABA president says LSC needs extra money for COVID-19 issues

ABA President Judy Perry Martinez is asking Congress to provide a supplemental appropriation for the Legal Services Corp. The cash…

ABA commission points out legal ed and licensure issues that built access-to-justice barriers
The costs of legal education and licensure should not act as a barrier for the quality and availability of legal services, and legal education should not be one size fits all, according to commentary released Wednesday by the ABA's Commission on the Future of Legal Education.
President of the Legal Services Corp. reflects on his tenure

Asked to reflect on his nine-year tenure as president of the Legal Services Corp., Jim Sandman says he is proud of many things that he and his team accomplished. In this new Legal Rebels Podcast episode, he speaks with the ABA Journal’s Victor Li.

New report outlines how legal services can prepare for and respond to disasters
A new report from the Legal Services Corp.'s Disaster Task Force counts 537 presidential disaster-related declarations, including 288 major disaster declarations, from January 2014 to July 2019.
Video teleconference program for immigrant children ‘is contrary to the American pursuit of justice,’ ABA says
ABA President Judy Perry Martinez joined leaders from Kids in Need of Defense on Wednesday in condemning a new pilot program at the Houston Immigration Court that requires all cases involving unaccompanied immigrant children to be heard via video teleconference.

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