Business of Law

672 ABA Journal Business of Law articles.

Not all litigation analytics products are created equal

Litigation software is expected to deliver accurate and comprehensive results, but the outcome isn’t always as clear cut.

Law firms are staffing up on bankruptcy lawyers in anticipation of a post-COVID-19 boom

A lot remains unknown about our post-coronavirus future, but an onslaught of commercial bankruptcies seems inescapable—and law firms are taking a hard look at their bankruptcy and restructuring practice groups in anticipation of increased demand.

Would a government-backed social credit scoring system like China’s ever fly in the US?
Awards are great marketing tools, but they’re not all created equal

Lucy Davis of Davis Law Group in Seattle is not an attorney. In fact, she is ineligible to sit for the bar. That’s because she’s a poodle. Nevertheless, that didn’t prevent her from being honored as a Lawyer of Distinction in the personal injury field in 2017.

Some lawyers have baked their political views into their firms’ DNA

It’s long been acknowledged that politics should be a topic avoided on dates, at family gatherings and at work. But for some attorneys, being political has become part of their business model.

ABA Techshow 2020 adopted a holistic approach to law
Gunshot detection technology company voluntarily submitted itself for an audit after privacy concerns

Believing concerns that its microphones could allow for eavesdropping on private conversations were largely because of a misunderstanding of the product, ShotSpotter did something radical: It opened itself up to an independent privacy audit conducted by the Policing Project at the New York University School of Law.

Facebook’s woes may have driven big firms away, but small firms and solos still see it as a great way to advertise
Amazon’s Ring doorbell cameras may help deter package thefts, but critics worry about overreach

According to the New York Times, more than 90,000 packages a day are stolen or disappear without explanation in New York City alone, up about 20% from four years ago.

What can lawyers do to combat their bad PR?

If you’re a lawyer, you’ve probably encountered hundreds if not thousands of lawyer jokes. While laughing at lawyer punchlines is all fun and games, it can also lead to dire consequences if the public distrusts attorneys enough not to hire them.

Recent spate of big-money guaranteed contracts for lateral partners raises eyebrows and concerns
Why have automated timekeeping programs failed to gain a foothold in the industry?

The technology’s promise to lawyers that they would never have to enter another timeslip has remained unfulfilled. But new time-capture software with artificial intelligence composed of machine learning and natural language processing is rolling out.

Attorney balances his firm’s demands with duties as a judge in local, federal and tribal courts

To borrow an analogy from Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr., if lawyers are baseball players and judges are umpires, then Greg Smith not only calls balls and strikes, he also throws them and tries to hit them. Smith is a family lawyer in Tennessee. When he’s not practicing law, he’s interpreting it—serving as a judge at three different levels of government.

China’s all-virtual specialty internet courts look set to expand into other areas of the law

Built to more efficiently resolve the increasing number of online disputes finding their way into the Chinese court system, internet courts also act as an incubator for a judiciary going through rapid change.

Some states are allowing people and companies to use blockchain to authenticate documents

Looking to capture a slice of the emerging blockchain market, states have enacted new laws and procedures for recognition of signatures, documents and contracts stored on the technology as legal instruments for verification.

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