ABA Journal

Career & Practice

10946 ABA Journal Career & Practice articles.

Weekly Briefs: Accused ‘my guns are bigger’ judge resigns; Texas district attorney resigns, takes the Fifth

Judge who displayed gun on bench resigns

Judge David W. Hummel Jr. of West Virginia has resigned from the bench after a video confirmed that he placed a gun on…

Many federal judges want clerkship diversity but say the topic is rarely addressed in court, new study says

In a recent study of federal appellate judges, many indicated that they had difficulties hiring Black law clerks. Black jurists, who make up less than one-eighth of the federal appellate courts, hired more than half of the Black clerks.

2 federal appeals judges boycotting Yale Law clerks see progress in campus tolerance for conservative views

Two conservative federal appeals judges who previously announced plans to boycott Yale Law School clerks said they are seeing progress in tolerance for differing viewpoints at a university event Wednesday.

Hogan Lovells lawyer says she was fired after defending Dobbs, discussing abortion impact and genocide

A Hogan Lovells lawyer has said she was fired and blackballed by other law firms after she referred to abortion rates in the Black community during a discussion of the U.S. Supreme Court decision overturning Roe v. Wade and the right to abortion.

Nicotine addiction costs vaping trial lawyer more than $2,100

A federal magistrate judge in Youngstown, Ohio, has sanctioned a suburban Cleveland lawyer more than $2,100 for vaping in the courtroom during the trial of an employment discrimination case.

Citing ‘overcapacity,’ Cooley lays off 150 lawyers and professionals

Cooley has laid off 78 lawyers and 72 paralegals and business professionals as a result of “overcapacity” following an “unexpected economic downturn.”

Slow Going: Despite diversity gains, some law firm leaders bemoan lack of progress

A series of recent studies have revealed the lack of diversity in law firm partnerships—even after the May 2020 murder of George Floyd spurred the profession to respond to calls for racial justice by launching in-house diversity programs and hiring more chief diversity officers.

Could hybrid work and generational shifts finally kill email?

For years, tech and business experts have predicted the death of email. “My sense is that the younger generation of lawyers use email less as a communication vehicle, and [they] have grown up in a world where their communication is done through social media apps,” says Jason St. John, managing partner of Saul Ewing Arnstein & Lehr.

Firms are employing burnout advisers to keep their attorneys from getting overwhelmed

It’s no secret that attorneys are burned out—but the surprising news is that firms are finally taking action to combat it. Some legal teams are hiring burnout advisers to address attorney mental health in the hope that this will tackle attorney fatigue, detachment and other issues stemming from the competitive environment, long working hours and perfectionism that comes with the job.

Your law firm’s fee structure can affect financial planning

A firm’s chosen fee structure and how its finances are handled can lay the foundation for the entire life of the business and sometimes provides early indicators in determining whether it will grow and thrive or eventually crumble.

8 types of clients you must manage in your legal practice

How a client behaves may not only negatively impact a firm and its lawyers: Untrustworthy clients may also pose a professional responsibility risk. I’ve developed some tips to manage the untrustworthy client as well as other difficult clients.

Former NBA lawyer is changing the game with holistic legal consulting for athletes

When she joined the Clippers in 2015, Nicole Duckett was the first Black woman to serve as a chief legal officer for any NBA team. In July, she founded Nikki Duckett Collective, a full-service legal consulting firm that provides holistic representation to ambitious elite athletes. It’s about global branding, savvy deal-making and long-term success—things Duckett already has spent decades achieving for her clients.

A lawyer’s passion for pets prompts career switch

A few months before the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, I left federal government service as an attorney for a maritime regulatory agency to honor my life’s mission to work in the pet health equity space. Pet health equity is a growing field dedicated to providing access to veterinary care and veterinary products for companion animals, regardless of their owner’s resources and location.

Should disbarred lawyers be given second chances?

Currently, disbarment is always permanent in New Jersey and a minority of other states. In some other states, including Louisiana, disbarment can either be permanent or temporary. But in the majority of states and in the District of Columbia, disbarred lawyers may apply for readmission after a period of time—often at least five years.

Vietnam vet carries combat skills and a desire to serve others into the courtroom

Randall Kinnard says he learned a lot about pressure, stress and loss during the Vietnam War. But he says he also realized he could transfer those tough lessons to the courtroom. “I elected to focus my practice on injured people and wanting to use those skills I had to help them achieve some fairness back into their life.”

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