ABA Journal

Careers

8603 ABA Journal Careers articles.

Rudy Giuliani will send you a personal greeting through Cameo—for a fee

Lawyer Rudy Giuliani has joined Cameo, in which you can book him to send a personalized greeting for $375.

Stoicism and the legal profession: Refraining from being quarrelsome

I graduated from the University of Oklahoma with a degree in philosophy, focusing on the East Asian and ancient varieties. I loved my course studies, and I’ve stayed engaged in the art of self-examination, to a certain degree, ever since.

Biden’s new picks for solicitor general and Manhattan US attorney once clerked for AG Garland

President Joe Biden’s new nominees for U.S. solicitor general and for U.S. attorney in Manhattan, New York City, both clerked for U.S. Attorney General Merrick Garland when he was a federal appeals judge, and both clerked for U.S. Supreme Court justices.

Law prof’s federal discrimination suit against University of Idaho allowed to go forward

A U.S. district judge last week denied the University of Idaho’s motion for summary judgment on gender and race discrimination claims brought by a Black female law professor who claims she was unfairly denied an associate dean position and a stipend.

Law professors Stephen and Barbara Gillers turn breakfast chats into legal ethics podcast

It all started with John Dean, Stephen Gillers tells me. In 1973, Dean, President Richard Nixon’s White House counsel, testified at the Senate Watergate hearings. He provided the committee investigating the scandal with a list of those likely to be indicted for their roles. Dean put asterisks next to those who were lawyers. There were 10.

‘Terrible things happening’ presents a great opportunity, says ABA Medal recipient Lawrence Fox

“We should recognize our own obligation, and everyone in this room certainly does that, but we need to recruit more, and we need to recruit quickly,” said ABA Medal recipient Lawrence J. Fox.

‘The sun is rising on the rule of law in the United States,’ says incoming ABA President Reginald Turner

In accepting his position as president of the American Bar Association, Reginald M. Turner shared the story of a half sun painted on the back of an armchair owned by Founding Father and former President George Washington. Fellow Founding Father Benjamin Franklin wondered whether the sun was rising or setting.

What does it mean for a lawyer to retire?

As my hair started turning salt-and-peppery, the most common question I faced was, “Are you retired from practice yet?” The second most common was, “When do you plan to retire?” But what does it mean for a lawyer to retire? What changes?

Weekly Briefs: More people apply to law school; gun-pointing lawyers pardoned

Law school applicants jump, along with high LSAT scores

The number of law school applicants jumped by 13% this year, the biggest hike since 2002. The data from the Law…

Biden nominates first openly LGBTQ woman to a federal appeals court

President Joe Biden’s sixth round of judicial nominees includes a Vermont Supreme Court justice who would be the first openly LGBTQ woman to serve on a federal appeals court.

After his last firm dissolved, lawyer reinvents himself as conservative civil liberties warrior

A law firm partner known for civil litigation has reinvented himself as a lawyer for conservative causes and the accused U.S. Capitol rioters.

This law school had the widest gap between student debt and graduate earnings

Students at many higher-education schools are facing an unhappy truth: Their student debt dwarfs their salaries two years after graduation.

Investigators conclude Cuomo sexually harassed women; ‘the typical rules did not apply,’ says one employee

A report by investigators appointed by New York Attorney General Letitia James has found that New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo sexually harassed multiple women, including former and current state employees.

Law & Order’s prime-time formula shaped a generation’s understanding of the legal system

During its original broadcast run from 1990 until 2010, Law & Order became a cultural phenomenon. With an emphasis on procedure as the primary plot device and less reliance on exploring characters’ personal lives or relationships, the success of the show spawned numerous similar shows and spin-offs while inspiring countless fans to go to law school or pursue careers in law enforcement.

This New York attorney uses TikTok to shed light on lawyer life

Unhappy young lawyers often share a common lament: “If only I’d known what being a lawyer was really like.” It’s easy to understand the disconnect. After all, TV shows, movies and the media focus primarily on the endgame—the trial, the closing, the conviction. There’s rarely much about the day-to-day legal work leading up to that big moment—assuming there is one at all. Cecillia X. Xie is out to change that.

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