ABA Journal

Civil Rights

4267 ABA Journal Civil Rights articles.

Lawyers who released Trump’s ‘dangerous’ fruit deposition should be sanctioned, motion says

Opposing counsel should be sanctioned for releasing deposition testimony in which former President Donald Trump expressed his fear of being hit by hurled fruit, according to a motion filed by Trump’s lawyers.

Legal experts fear loss of abortion right could usher in end of same-sex marriage, other rights

In the two days since Politico published a draft U.S. Supreme Court opinion that seems to strike down Roe v. Wade, several legal experts have expressed concerns that the same reasoning that eliminates the right to abortion could also put other constitutional rights at risk.

Infowars host’s lawyer says the N-word in a dropped-pants comedy routine; should he face discipline?

A Connecticut-based branch of Black Lives Matter is calling for the suspension of a criminal defense lawyer who dropped his pants and used the N-word in a comedy routine.

Judge orders man accused of defacing gay pride mural to write essay on Pulse nightclub shooting

A Florida judge has ordered a man who admitted defacing a gay pride street mural with skid marks to write an essay on the 2016 Pulse nightclub shooting in Orlando, Florida, that killed 49 people.

As states consider regulation targeting transgender youths, some minds have been changed

A lawyer at the National Center for Lesbian Rights says despite several legislative obstacles, many LGBTQ clients are finding support from churches, neighbors and schools.

Volunteer attorneys needed to help Afghan evacuees stuck in limbo within Abu Dhabi camp

Jordan Jones went to the United Arab Emirates in late March, hoping to help Afghan judges, prosecutors and rule of law professionals who fled their country nearly eight months earlier.

How and why Kazakhstan gave up its Soviet-era nuclear weapons

When the Soviet Union dissolved and Kazakhstan became a sovereign state, it now had a conundrum: Should the country retain the nuclear weapons and become the world’s fourth largest nuclear power or relinquish them in return for international commitments?

Transgender lawyer wins suit for declaration that trans discrimination violates attorney ethics rules

A transgender lawyer has won her lawsuit seeking a declaration that attorney ethics rules in Illinois do not allow discrimination based on gender identity. “I am absolutely overjoyed at this result, because for the first time trans litigants and attorneys in Illinois can walk into court knowing that misgendering, deadnaming and genital inspections are prohibited and they have recourse for violations,” Sheryl Ring said.

Deputy who witnessed ‘skivvies’-clad colleague baptize woman after traffic stop can’t escape suit, federal judge rules

A woman who claims that she allowed a “skivvies”-clad Tennessee sheriff’s deputy to baptize her based on his promise of leniency can continue to pursue her lawsuit against another deputy who witnessed the “desacralized rite,” a federal judge has ruled.

US House should support bill establishing independent immigration courts, ABA president says

ABA President Reginald Turner is calling on leaders in the U.S. House of Representatives to support the creation of an Article I immigration court system that would be independent of the Department of Justice.

Law that keeps racist covenants in separate public record helps preserve history, top state court says

The Washington Supreme Court has said a new state law strikes a balance between removing racial covenants from a home’s title while keeping them part of the public record.

ABA policy summit yields recommendations for racial equity and social justice

“Since the 2020 presidential election, the Biden-Harris administration has offered policy correctives on a spectrum of civil rights and social justice issues. Still, we have more to accomplish,” writes ABA Journal columnist Engy Abdelkader.

Weekly Briefs: BigLaw firm settles ‘mommy track’ suit; ban on scraped court data challenged

Morrison & Foerster settles ‘mommy track’ suit

Morrison & Foerster has settled with two remaining plaintiffs in a lawsuit contending that the law firm discriminates against lawyer moms. In…

I Spy: As more companies surveil workers at home, do laws do enough to protect privacy?

When demand for employee monitoring technology soared as millions moved from the office to remote work during the coronavirus pandemic, class action lawyer Benjamin F. Johns took note. “When everyone went remote, it heightened the concerns about privacy. And while employees do have to give up some of their rights, just by virtue of the employer-employee relationship, they don’t give up all their privacy rights,” Johns says.

Reigning Supreme: A tipped scale has unbalanced our ‘coequal’ branches of government

Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson’s nomination as the first Black woman to serve on the U.S. Supreme Court is historic and aspirational. But Jackson replaces retiring Justice Stephen G. Breyer, and the court will retain its lopsided 6-3 conservative supermajority.

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