ABA Journal

Civil Rights

4393 ABA Journal Civil Rights articles.

Chemerinsky: When can state governments sue the United States?

A recurring issue before the Supreme Court this term, including in two cases to be argued in the next month, concerns when state governments have standing to sue the United States. Over the last decade, there has been an explosion of such suits.

Blackballed?

Gideon at 60: The right to a lawyer was established, but the promise of equal justice remains elusive

Legal community supports Ukrainians displaced by Russia’s war against Ukraine

The Ukrainian Mothers and Children Transport initiative, or UMACT, is a collaboration of lawyers, professors and law students that helps Ukrainian families secure travel visas. Its name aims to evoke the Kindertransport, which brought 10,000 Jewish children to the United Kingdom as World War II loomed, says law professor Michael Bazyler, a former refugee from Poland of Ukrainian descent.

Protection Services: Meet the lawyers and staff behind the ABA’s work in children’s law

Nearly 45 years after its founding, the ABA Center on Children and the Law has evolved into a midsize nonprofit with nearly 20 staff members who promote access to justice for children and families. The center now helps manage as many as 30 grant projects each year that focus on diverse areas of children’s law, including legal representation; foster care and education; kin and relative caregivers; child, adolescent and parental health; youth engagement; and state and court initiatives.

‘Routine performance management’ can’t be basis for fired associate’s bias suit, BigLaw firm argues

Kirkland & Ellis is arguing that a fired associate’s lawsuit against the firm should be tossed partly because a harassment claim under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act can’t be based on “routine performance management.”

Anti-discrimination laws are faltering in the face of artificial intelligence; here’s what to do about it

“On the basis of.” These four words from the Civil Rights Act of 1964 underlie the modern conception of illegal bias. From federal anti-discrimination statutes to state and local laws, this phrase nearly unites them all.

DeSantis violated Florida Constitution by suspending prosecutor, but federal court can’t act, judge says

A federal judge in Florida has ruled that the 11th Amendment prevents him from ordering the reinstatement of a reform prosecutor suspended by Republican Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis.

Law prof stirs controversy with tweet calling Scalia ‘basically a klansman’

Updated: A professor at the Emory University School of Law is under fire after he tweeted that the late U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia was “basically a klansman.”

Supreme Court considers Title VII accommodation for Christian postal worker who wouldn’t work on Sundays

The U.S. Supreme Court agreed Friday to decide the case of a Christian postal worker who quit his job after he was disciplined for refusing to work on Sundays for religious reasons.

Weekly Briefs: Judge slashes $24M award for Unite the Right victims; judge accused of offering sex for early trial

Judge slashes $24M punitive award in Unite the Right trial

U.S. District Judge Norman K. Moon of the Western District of Virginia has slashed an award of $24 million in…

Asylum-seekers entering US illegally would be subject to rebuttable presumption under Biden border proposal

President Joe Biden announced a new border policy Thursday that will admit up to 30,000 migrants per month from Cuba, Haiti, Nicaragua and Venezuela.

Chemerinsky: Expect another wave of significant rulings as the Supreme Court returns

Sometimes an especially momentous U.S. Supreme Court term is followed by a quieter year with fewer blockbuster decisions. But that is not what we should expect when the court hands down its rulings for this term in spring 2023. Once more, the court’s docket is filled with cases of great legal and social importance that will profoundly affect the lives of many people.

Why did Gorsuch join liberal justices who wanted to lift Trump-era Title 42 immigration policy?

Four justices dissented when the U.S. Supreme Court issued a Dec. 27 order that keeps in place a Trump-era immigration policy pending further litigation by 19 Republican-led states.

11th Circuit upholds school’s ban on transgender students using bathrooms corresponding with gender identity

In a decision that creates a circuit split, a federal appeals court has upheld a Florida school district’s policy that bans transgender students from using bathrooms that correspond with their gender identity.

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