ABA Journal

Civil Rights

4057 ABA Journal Civil Rights articles.

Afternoon Briefs: SCOTUS tosses child slavery case; DOJ drops suit and probe over Bolton book

SCOTUS tosses suit over child slavery in Ivory Coast

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Thursday that Nestlé USA and Cargill can’t be sued here under the Alien Tort Statute for…

Supreme Court rules for Catholic foster agency that refuses to place children with same-sex couples

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Thursday that Philadelphia violated the free exercise clause when it refused to contract with a Catholic foster care agency that refuses to place children with same-sex couples.

Afternoon Briefs: Hate speech mustn’t be normalized, ABA president says; Title IX protects gay and transgender students

ABA president: Hate speech legitimizes intolerance

ABA President Patricia Lee Refo said Tuesday the association is “deeply troubled” by recent hate speech directed at Jewish, LGBTQ, Asian American and Muslim…

Biden’s latest judicial picks include a voting rights lawyer nominated to the 2nd Circuit

President Joe Biden’s latest round of judicial picks includes a voting rights lawyer nominated to the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals at New York. Biden announced five judicial nominations Tuesday, which brings his total nominees to 24.

DOJ says it can defend religious exemption that allows LGBTQ discrimination in education

The U.S. Department of Justice is opposing an attempt by Christian colleges to intervene in a lawsuit by asserting that it can defend a religious exemption that allows the schools to discriminate against LGBTQ students.

‘Vice Patrol’ examines how police and courts enforced anti-gay laws before Stonewall

In Vice Patrol: Cops, Courts, and the Struggle Over Urban Gay Life Before Stonewall, author Anna Lvovsky examines the way that queer communities were policed in the 1930s through the 1960s.

ACLU is split by internal debate over First Amendment support for hate speech

The American Civil Liberties Union, long known for its support of the First Amendment, is dealing with internal dissension over defense of hate speech.

Afternoon Briefs: Judge compares AR-15 to Swiss Army knife; suit claims GC wasn’t rehired because of long-haul COVID-19

Federal judge strikes down ban on assault weapons

Citing the Second Amendment, U.S. District Judge Roger Benitez of the Southern District of California struck down California’s ban on assault weapons…

Law professors aim to show value of diversity in new study

Articles published by student-run law reviews were cited more often after they adopted diversity policies for selecting editors, according to a study that will be published in the Columbia Law Review.

More police departments are training officers in de-escalation techniques, but does it work?

Could police have avoided killing—whether the victims were armed or not? Advocates of de-escalation believe that many such deaths can be prevented. Yet what de-escalation means and how effective it is remain subject to debate.

Do varying legal definitions of race leave room for abuse?

The federal government does not have precise legal definitions of what it means to be a member of a particular race. And with no centralized federal guidance, federal and state agencies have pieced together definitions, applying them in disparate settings. In recent years, these inconsistent definitions have been criticized for allowing undeserving people to fit themselves into racial categories to benefit from contracts, jobs or university admissions slots intended for racial or ethnic minorities.

Bigoted attacks must be met with stronger protections

For a variety of reasons, including voluntary reporting and a lack of police training or acknowledgment of bias incidents, tracking hate crimes is challenging and imperfect.

This voting rights advocate and ‘Jeopardy!’ champ is ready with the right answers

In addition to appearing on Jeopardy! last year, Zach Newkirk was involved with a lawsuit against then-President Donald Trump on behalf of those injured during the 2020 Black Lives Matter protests in Lafayette Square.

Several law firms plan to make Juneteenth a permanent paid holiday; will it become an industry standard?

The “vast majority” of several dozen law firms contacted by Law360 Pulse plan to make Juneteenth a permanent holiday after observing it last year.

Afternoon Briefs: Kristen Clarke confirmed as DOJ civil rights chief; SCOTUS chief justice speaks to law grads

Senate confirms Kristen Clarke

The U.S. Senate on Tuesday confirmed Kristen Clarke to head the Department of Justice’s Civil Rights Division on a 51-48 vote. Clarke was president and…

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