ABA Journal

COVID-19

908 ABA Journal COVID-19 articles.

Court backlogs have increased by an average of one-third during the pandemic, new report finds

The average case backlog for state and local courts across the United States increased by about one-third amid the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a report released this month from Thomson Reuters.

Volunteer legal work needed for pending evictions crisis, says ABA president

Millions of households are behind on their rent and think they will be evicted in the next few months, wrote U.S. Attorney General Merrick Garland in an Aug. 30 letter to the legal community calling for volunteer services.

Education Department opens investigations on states prohibiting school masking requirements

States with laws that prohibit indoor masking requirements, including at schools, might discriminate against students at risk for severe illness if they contract the COVID-19 virus, according to an Aug. 30 news release from the U.S. Department of Education.

Family law judge backtracks on visitation order for mom regarding COVID-19 vaccine

After entering an order sua sponte to suspend a parent’s visitation rights until she received the COVID-19 vaccine, an Illinois family law judge revisited the issue Monday with a…

Supreme Court blocks eviction moratorium, cites lack of CDC authority

The U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday blocked the latest federal ban on evictions, siding with real estate groups that argued the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention exceeded its authority by imposing the moratorium during the COVID-19 pandemic. Justices Stephen Breyer, Elena Kagan and Sonia Sotomayor dissented.

At least 2 federal appeals courts require vaccinations for oral arguments; other circuits differ

Federal appeals courts “are implementing wildly different responses to the delta variant surge," according to an analysis by Law360.

Midlevel associates rated these firms tops for job satisfaction; survey finds hybrid work preference

Midlevel associates surveyed by the American Lawyer have ranked McDermott Will & Emery No. 1 for job satisfaction.

Mask mandate didn’t violate Catholic school’s religious freedom rights, 6th Circuit says

A federal appeals court on Monday upheld a federal judge’s refusal to block a mask mandate in a challenge brought by a Catholic elementary school in Lansing, Michigan.

State supreme court’s chief justice declares justice system emergency to increase pro bono representation

The Virginia Supreme Court’s chief justice has issued an emergency order to increase the pool of lawyers who can represent indigent tenants who are facing eviction and others in need of free legal help.

DC Circuit keeps latest eviction moratorium in place; Supreme Court is asked to intervene

Real-estate groups are asking the U.S. Supreme Court to block the latest eviction moratorium by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention after a federal appeals court declined to do so.

Tara Isa Koslov brings passion for antitrust law to the ABA

As a kid growing up in Brooklyn, Koslov thought she might pursue a career in journalism. That changed after Koslov saw a gunman shoot and wound her father as they walked together near their home in 1983. “My dad was such a good writer and communicator, but he was not a lawyer, so he was dependent on the lawyers to tell his story,” she says. “I thought, ‘I like to speak, and I love to write. Maybe I need to focus my skills in that direction instead.’”

Weekly Briefs: Judge adds vaccination to bail conditions; criminal cases affected by ‘massive’ data loss

Federal judge orders vaccination as bail condition

U.S. District Judge Jed Rakoff of Manhattan on Tuesday ordered a drug defendant to receive a COVID-19 vaccination as a condition of bail.…

Now that the COVID-19 vaccine has full approval from the FDA, how will employers respond?

There’s a sense that implementing mandatory vaccine policies could be difficult for employers—particularly when employees are not seeking religious or medical accommodations and instead fall into the “I don’t want to” group.

New CEO of IP law firm talks dynamic leadership with client-centric insight

Ari Kaplan recently spoke with Raymond Millien, the new CEO of Harness, Dickey & Pierce, an intellectual property boutique firm with four offices and headquarters in suburban Detroit.

Top 4 unexpected culture killers for post-COVID-19 hybrid work

While individual schedules will vary, on any given day, firms will have a segment of their team in the office, and another segment dispersed. After more than a full year of working remotely, this will be yet another disruption for law firms to endure.

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