ABA Journal

Employees

93 ABA Journal Employees articles.

Federal court will investigate leak of survey describing alleged bias and bullying by judges

The federal court in Washington, D.C., will investigate the leak of a confidential workplace survey that revealed allegations of bullying and discrimination by some trial-level and appeals judges.

This federal appeals judge has hired only male law clerks, with one exception, since 1990, survey finds

Federal trial-level and appeals judges in Washington, D.C., are required to attend workplace training this month, after a confidential survey revealed allegations of bullying and discrimination by some judges.

First Amendment doesn’t protect fired police officers who criticized department changes, 6th Circuit rules

The First Amendment does not protect two Tennessee police officers who were fired for objecting to changes in their department, an appeals court has ruled.

2Civility’s new executive director speaks out against workplace bullying

As the new executive director of the Illinois Supreme Court Commission on Professionalism, or 2Civility, attorney Erika Harold wants to use her platform to shine a light on workplace bullying.

Lawyers have an obligation to ensure employees don’t solicit clients, new ABA ethics opinion says

Attorneys not only must refrain from engaging in improper direct solicitation of potential clients, but there is also an ethical responsibility to ensure that employees or others hired by the lawyers do not engage in such misconduct.

Vaccine refusal leads New York courts to fire 103 workers, ban 4 judges from courthouses

The New York state court system has fired 103 employees and banned four judges from courthouses for refusing to comply with a COVID-19 vaccine mandate.

Op-ed shoots down criticism of SCOTUS nominee Ketanji Brown Jackson for ruling against class of Black workers

Updated: A Harvard Law School professor and a former federal appeals judge are pushing back against criticism of U.S. Supreme Court nominee Ketanji Brown Jackson for a ruling that she made in a lawsuit by a group of Black workers suing Lockheed Martin, a security and aerospace company, for alleged discrimination.

The winners in law’s ‘Great Resignation’ will be firms that focus on innovation, not compensation

Law had an attrition problem before the pandemic hit. Now it’s in hyperdrive, dovetailing with a wider movement of dissatisfied workers quitting their jobs in the wake of lockdown restrictions, in what economists have dubbed the “Great Resignation.”

Legal employment has broken pre-pandemic records, revised figures show

The number of legal jobs broke pre-pandemic records in October 2021, according to revised data released Friday by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Judge lifts order barring 7 health care workers from jumping to new hospital

A Wisconsin judge on Monday lifted his prior order that temporarily barred seven health care workers from leaving their hospital in Neenah, Wisconsin, for new jobs in Appleton, Wisconsin.

Supreme Court will hear case of praying football coach

The U.S. Supreme Court on Friday agreed to hear the case of a high school football coach who lost his job after defying the school district’s orders to stop praying with students at the 50-yard line after games.

Roberts, Kavanaugh votes key as SCOTUS upholds vaccine mandate for health workers but not for others

The U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday gave the Biden administration one loss and one win in its bid to impose vaccine requirements on health care workers and employees at larger companies.

Judge slams Davis Wright for failing to mention settled, adverse caselaw, orders $40K in sanctions

A federal judge has ordered Davis Wright Tremaine and one of its partners to pay more than $40,000 in sanctions for failing to mention “long-standing, settled caselaw” that barred the court from issuing an injunction sought by the law firm.

Lawyer is suspended for texting witness during phone deposition; how did opposing counsel find out?

A Florida lawyer has been suspended for 91 days for texting advice to a witness during a phone deposition and then failing to come clean when questioned by the opposing counsel and a judge.

6th Circuit picked to consider 34 challenges to vaccine mandate; these plaintiffs filed initial suits there

The 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals at Cincinnati was picked in a court lottery Tuesday to hear 34 consolidated challenges to the Biden administration’s vaccine mandate for larger employers.

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