ABA Journal

Employees

109 ABA Journal Employees articles.

Strip search by transgender guard violated inmate’s religious rights, 7th Circuit says

A federal appeals court ruled Friday for a Muslim inmate in Wisconsin who claimed that his religious rights were violated by strip searches conducted by a transgender prison guard.

Federal magistrate judge isn’t reappointed amid probe into alleged abusive environment

A federal magistrate judge in New Mexico won’t be serving another term amid a probe into allegations that she created an abusive and hostile work environment. Federal judges voted against the reappointment of U.S. Magistrate Judge Carmen E. Garza before completion of the probe, according to a Sept. 14 order.

Judge tosses suit by Yale psych prof fired over diagnosis of Trump and Dershowitz

A federal judge in Connecticut has tossed a lawsuit filed by a volunteer psychiatry professor at Yale University who lost her job after suggesting publicly that former President Donald Trump and lawyer Alan Dershowitz may have shared psychiatric symptoms "by contagion."

More law firms appear to ease mandatory retirement policies

The median age for all lawyers in the United States is increasing, as more law firms appear to be easing mandatory retirement policies.

Federal judge temporarily blocks law banning ‘woke’ workplace training, compares Florida to ‘Stranger Things’

A federal judge has blocked provisions in a Florida law that forbid promoting concepts based on race, color, sex or national origin in workplace training and educational materials.

Damages awards reach nearly 10-year high in employment cases, new report shows

A total of $1.17 billion in damages were awarded in 1,016 employment cases in 2021, representing the highest amount of damages in nearly a decade, according to a new report released in early August.

Athletic director’s claims that she was fired for being gay are rejected by 8th Circuit

A federal appeals court has ruled in favor of the University of Minnesota, which faced claims of discrimination after firing an openly gay athletic director in 2014.

Sleepwalking employee who got into next-door colleague’s hotel bed isn’t protected by disability law, 5th Circuit rules

An employee who was fired after sleepwalking into her colleague’s bed in a next-door hotel room is not protected by disability law, a federal appeals court has ruled.

‘ABA Profile of the Legal Profession’ report shines a light on judicial diversity

It’s been 94 years since Genevieve Rose Cline became the first female federal judge, and 77 years since President Harry Truman appointed the first Black federal judge, Irvin Charles Mollison. Decades later, judicial diversity remains an ongoing concern. And it is front and center of the ABA Profile of the Legal Profession 2022 report released Thursday.

Following her experiences, former law clerk seeks support for the Judiciary Accountability Act

Aliza Shatzman didn’t realize that federal judicial employees are not protected by Title VII of the Civil Rights Act. That is until the judge she worked for in 2020 ended her clerkship early—for reasons that she thinks were due to gender discrimination.

Federal judge blocks guidance on bathroom, locker room access for transgender students and employees

A federal judge in Tennessee has blocked guidance that says federal bans on sex discrimination protect transgender students and employees who want to use bathrooms and locker rooms and play on sports teams that correspond with their gender identity.

Legal jobs continued upward climb in June; sector adds 92,300 jobs since pandemic low

The legal services sector added 3,000 jobs in June, according to seasonally adjusted, preliminary figures released Friday by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

How the decision overturning Roe v. Wade affects insurance coverage for abortions and related litigation

Insurance companies are facing new legal issues after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled last month that there is no constitutional right to abortion.

Top California court will consider employer liability for take-home COVID-19 infections

The California Supreme Court has agreed to decide whether state law permits lawsuits against employers when workers contract COVID-19 and bring the virus home to relatives.

Law firm partners accused of ethics violations for ‘anti-competitive’ employment contracts

The name partners of the law firm Tully Rinckey have been accused of ethics violations for allegedly adding anti-competitive terms to attorney employment agreements and impeding clients’ ability to follow departing lawyers.

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