ABA Journal

Employees

116 ABA Journal Employees articles.

‘ABA Profile of the Legal Profession’ report shines a light on judicial diversity

It’s been 94 years since Genevieve Rose Cline became the first female federal judge, and 77 years since President Harry Truman appointed the first Black federal judge, Irvin Charles Mollison. Decades later, judicial diversity remains an ongoing concern. And it is front and center of the ABA Profile of the Legal Profession 2022 report released Thursday.

Following her experiences, former law clerk seeks support for the Judiciary Accountability Act

Aliza Shatzman didn’t realize that federal judicial employees are not protected by Title VII of the Civil Rights Act. That is until the judge she worked for in 2020 ended her clerkship early—for reasons that she thinks were due to gender discrimination.

Federal judge blocks guidance on bathroom, locker room access for transgender students and employees

A federal judge in Tennessee has blocked guidance that says federal bans on sex discrimination protect transgender students and employees who want to use bathrooms and locker rooms and play on sports teams that correspond with their gender identity.

Legal jobs continued upward climb in June; sector adds 92,300 jobs since pandemic low

The legal services sector added 3,000 jobs in June, according to seasonally adjusted, preliminary figures released Friday by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

How the decision overturning Roe v. Wade affects insurance coverage for abortions and related litigation

Insurance companies are facing new legal issues after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled last month that there is no constitutional right to abortion.

Top California court will consider employer liability for take-home COVID-19 infections

The California Supreme Court has agreed to decide whether state law permits lawsuits against employers when workers contract COVID-19 and bring the virus home to relatives.

Law firm partners accused of ethics violations for ‘anti-competitive’ employment contracts

The name partners of the law firm Tully Rinckey have been accused of ethics violations for allegedly adding anti-competitive terms to attorney employment agreements and impeding clients’ ability to follow departing lawyers.

Federal appeals court makes it easier to assert job bias claims over job transfer requests

An en banc federal appeals court on Friday lowered the bar for workplace discrimination claims based on job transfers that are forced or rejected.

Federal court will investigate leak of survey describing alleged bias and bullying by judges

The federal court in Washington, D.C., will investigate the leak of a confidential workplace survey that revealed allegations of bullying and discrimination by some trial-level and appeals judges.

This federal appeals judge has hired only male law clerks, with one exception, since 1990, survey finds

Federal trial-level and appeals judges in Washington, D.C., are required to attend workplace training this month, after a confidential survey revealed allegations of bullying and discrimination by some judges.

First Amendment doesn’t protect fired police officers who criticized department changes, 6th Circuit rules

The First Amendment does not protect two Tennessee police officers who were fired for objecting to changes in their department, an appeals court has ruled.

2Civility’s new executive director speaks out against workplace bullying

As the new executive director of the Illinois Supreme Court Commission on Professionalism, or 2Civility, attorney Erika Harold wants to use her platform to shine a light on workplace bullying.

Lawyers have an obligation to ensure employees don’t solicit clients, new ABA ethics opinion says

Attorneys not only must refrain from engaging in improper direct solicitation of potential clients, but there is also an ethical responsibility to ensure that employees or others hired by the lawyers do not engage in such misconduct.

Vaccine refusal leads New York courts to fire 103 workers, ban 4 judges from courthouses

The New York state court system has fired 103 employees and banned four judges from courthouses for refusing to comply with a COVID-19 vaccine mandate.

Op-ed shoots down criticism of SCOTUS nominee Ketanji Brown Jackson for ruling against class of Black workers

Updated: A Harvard Law School professor and a former federal appeals judge are pushing back against criticism of U.S. Supreme Court nominee Ketanji Brown Jackson for a ruling that she made in a lawsuit by a group of Black workers suing Lockheed Martin, a security and aerospace company, for alleged discrimination.

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