Evidence

3377 ABA Journal Evidence articles.

2nd Circuit won’t consider reinstating suit alleging refusal to hire felons amounts to hiring bias
The 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals at New York has refused to consider reinstating a hiring-bias lawsuit claiming that a company’s ban on hiring convicted felons had a discriminatory impact on Black job applicants.
Rambling remarks by Trump impeachment lawyer bewilder pundits
The second impeachment defense of former President Donald Trump got off to a slow start Tuesday.
Federal judge who said he would ‘crush’ plaintiff’s case prejudged her bias claims, 5th Circuit says
A federal appeals court has revived a plaintiff’s bias claim and removed U.S. District Judge Lynn Hughes of the Southern District of Texas from her case, citing remarks and actions indicating that he had prejudged the case.
Judge sanctions lawyer and client $150K, citing ‘mountain of evasiveness’ and ‘outright lies’
A Texas judge has ordered a Houston-area lawyer and his client to be jointly sanctioned $150,000 for the client’s “outright lies” in litigation and “a mountain of evasiveness” in discovery.
Tales of double-crossing, big egos and cattle brands swirl around Gerry Spence lawsuits

Over the years, many attorneys shelled out thousands of dollars to spend three weeks in a converted Wyoming cattle ranch described as “spartan,” with no cellphone service, so they could listen and learn from the self-proclaimed “greatest trial lawyer in history.” From all over the country, lawyers came to the Trial Lawyers College to learn from Gerry Spence, the famed litigator who claims to have never lost a criminal case.

Arizona will implement Thomson Reuters’ digital evidence platform statewide
Arizona’s court system will begin utilizing Thomson Reuters’ cloud-based court exhibit and evidence sharing platform to assist with the handling of digital evidence across the state, it was announced Wednesday.
Federal inmate is executed after Supreme Court denies stay; dissent points to hidden evidence

Federal prisoner Brandon Bernard was executed in Indiana on Thursday after the U.S. Supreme Court refused to stay his execution. Bernard apologized for his role in the deaths of two youth ministers in Texas in 1999. He was 18 at the time of the crime.

Law enforcement is using location tracking on mobile devices to identify suspects, but is it unconstitutional?

The use of reverse location warrants with Google and other companies tracking location data has exploded since that type of warrant first was used by federal authorities in 2016. As the use of geofence warrants has grown, so have controversies surrounding them.

Trump’s bid to block tax records subpoena based on ‘implausible speculation,’ 2nd Circuit says
A federal appeals court has ruled against President Donald Trump’s claim that a subpoena for his tax records was overbroad and was issued in bad faith.
Afternoon Briefs: Breonna Taylor grand jury recordings will be released; another firm pays special bonuses

Kentucky AG will release Breonna Taylor grand jury recordings

Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron has said he will comply with a judge’s order to release a recording of grand jury…

ABC’s ‘Judd, for the Defense’ and discovery obligations through the years
For this installment in my column, I initially set out to write one of my “look back” pieces on a legal-centric television show focused on a prosecutor. Initially, my pick was Jake and the Fatman. If nothing else, I love the show’s title. The series was in syndication from 1987 until 1992, but I couldn’t find a full episode anywhere. It’s not streaming, and it’s not on YouTube, Dailymotion, or any of my other usual go-to video aggregators. I’ll keep looking, but until then, I had to change course a bit.
Lawyer who allegedly lied about health for deadline extensions should be suspended, hearing board says
An Illinois lawyer, who reportedly lied and said he had cancer—when he did not—and instead was looking for discovery deadline extensions, is facing potential suspension from the practice of law. He also allegedly lied about having cancer on his University of Chicago Law School application.
8th Circuit rules against grand juror who wanted to talk about Michael Brown case
A federal appeals court has ruled against a grand juror who wanted to correct the record after a prosecutor discussed evidence in the 2014 fatal shooting of Michael Brown, an 18-year-old Black man, by a white police officer in Ferguson, Missouri.
Accused of hiding asbestos evidence, Cahill Gordon and chemical company agree to pay $73M
Cahill Gordon & Reindel and the chemical company BASF have agreed to pay $72.5 million to settle claims that the law firm and a company acquired by BASF had hidden evidence of asbestos in talc products during litigation.
Fight over Trump’s financial information resumes quickly after Supreme Court order
The fight for financial information about President Donald Trump and his businesses won't be delayed after the U.S. Supreme Court agreed Friday to issue an immediate judgment in the case.

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