ABA Journal

Evidence

3433 ABA Journal Evidence articles.

Governments should adopt the ABA’s best practices recommendations for police body-worn cameras, ABA House says

The ABA House of Delegates passed a resolution Monday urging governments around the country to adopt its policies on police body-worn cameras—technology that is a key part of measures on policing reform.

Federal appeals judge criticizes disparate-impact theory; are his opinions op-ed columns?

A federal appeals judge who is attracting national attention for his “aggressive rhetoric” in legal opinions has written a concurrence criticizing disparate-impact theory, likening it to critical race theory.

Judge scrutinizes BigLaw firm in ruling on evidence from blood-testing company Theranos that may be ‘irretrievably’ lost

The founder of blood-testing company Theranos can’t exclude government evidence at her fraud trial on the basis of lost, purportedly exculpatory evidence because her company was responsible for the destruction, a federal judge in San Jose, California, has ruled.

Federal appeals court upholds Judicial Watch’s $2.3M judgment against its founder

A federal appeals court has upheld a $2.3 million judgment obtained by the conservative watchdog group Judicial Watch against its founder, Larry Klayman.

‘Making a Murderer’ subject Steven Avery loses appellate bid for new-trial hearing; his lawyer is undeterred

The Wisconsin Court of Appeals on Wednesday rejected a request for a hearing in a new-trial bid by Steven Avery, whose case was portrayed in the Making a Murderer Netflix series.

Public defenders say modified ShotSpotter coordinates were used to implicate client; is it a widespread problem?

Gunshot detection technology known as ShotSpotter has been used as evidence in 190 court cases even as some critics raise questions about the technology.

Judge permits prosecutors to use facial recognition to open accused Capitol rioter’s laptop

A federal judge in Washington, D.C., on Wednesday granted a Department of Justice request to place an accused U.S. Capitol rioter in front of his laptop to unlock the device with facial recognition.

Lawyer who lobbed F-word at judge is sentenced to jail time

A St. Louis County lawyer has been sentenced to a week in jail for directing the F-word toward a judge during a hearing in a medical malpractice case.

Good cop, bad cop: What happens when police get too cozy with informants?

Over a year ago, I wrote a column for my “law and pop culture” series regarding the A&E show Live PD. In that column, I spoke about the problems these types of series can cause for defendants and law enforcement.

3 newest justices join Supreme Court liberals in decision for fleeing misdemeanor suspect

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Wednesday that police officers who are pursuing a misdemeanor suspect aren’t necessarily entitled to enter a home without a warrant.

Judge sanctions Dechert lawyers for ‘willful disregard’ of her order on impeachment evidence

A federal judge overseeing 3M earplug litigation in Pensacola, Florida, has sanctioned a Dechert lawyer $10,000 for showing jurors a slide on the devices’ effectiveness in closing arguments without making clear that the information could be considered for impeachment purposes but not for truthfulness.

DOJ seeks reinstatement of death penalty for Boston Marathon bomber

The U.S. Department of Justice is backing reinstatement of the death sentence for the Boston Marathon bomber in a brief filed Monday with the U.S. Supreme Court.

A new evidence management tool aims to help public defenders process video and audio

Two University of Chicago alums and technologists have developed a technology platform known as JusticeText, an AI-powered evidence management tool primarily geared toward public defenders.

Citing lack of evidence, prosecutor drops summons against appeals judge accused of nearly hitting protester

A specially appointed prosecutor won’t be pursuing a case against a North Carolina appeals judge who's accused of nearly hitting a Black Lives Matter protester with his SUV.

SCOTUS will hear case involving FBI surveillance of Muslim community and state secrets privilege

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday agreed to consider the government’s ability to invoke the state secrets privilege to defeat a lawsuit accusing the FBI of illegally spying on the Muslim community.

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