ABA Journal

Inter Alia

57 ABA Journal Inter Alia articles.

Debates about ‘freedom’ and ‘choice’ often misconstrue democracy

Although we live in a democracy, that doesn’t mean we have a wholesale, unfettered endorsement to do whatever we want. Our democracy is a social contract—a compact that is the foundation of the U.S. political system. A government established by “We the People” is indeed required to serve the people. But in exchange, members cooperate to ensure the common welfare and social benefits, and they must sacrifice some individual liberty.

How I went from civil litigator to animal policy strategist

Nearly 40 years into my legal career, I own and manage the Animal Policy Group and am shoulder-deep in every issue involving pets in the United States, usually on behalf of the biggest players in the pet sector—from veterinary to pharmaceutical, nutrition to retail and even veterinary colleges. How I got here is proof positive for young lawyers and law students that a JD takes you in more directions than any other profession.

Lawyer-chemist’s career path includes research into psychiatric uses for psychedelic mushrooms

Andrew Chadeayne, who holds a doctorate in chemistry, is also a patent lawyer. His experience includes intellectual property work for pharmaceutical companies and a major freight forwarder. But it was his work for the revolutionary cannabis research company Ebbu that ignited his interest in developing and commercializing the mind-altering properties of much-maligned plants.

Brazen attacks on voting rights define America

In 2020, this country had what’s been hailed as the most secure election in American history. And yet, lies about voter fraud have opened the door to false claims that our electoral system lacks integrity.

How to integrate well-being throughout your organization

If lawyers know the challenges to well-being, and they have been presented with ideas and strategies to improve wellness within their organizations, what stands in the way of creating systemic change?

From Defendant to Attorney: My journey to the other side of the justice system

“The year was 2005. I was 27 and securely set in my ways; however, God had another plan for my life. By then, I was no stranger to the justice system, having been a defendant in most courts throughout Wayne County. … This time, however, I was at the center of a drug sting operation with a confidential informant and marked money. I was facing up to 20 years in the Michigan Department of Corrections for delivery of a controlled substance.”

This New York City litigator advocates for transgender rights and is teaching other lawyers how to do it, too

“BigLaw requires a certain personality and way of doing things,” says Jillian Weiss. “I had always known I was transgender … and I just viewed it as something I had. I didn’t view it as bad, but I knew it was bad in the eyes of other people, so I had to hide it.”

The Chauvin conviction shows why diverse juries matter

When it comes to convicting police officers, clear and convincing evidence is only half the battle. But evidence—visual, circumstantial, forensic—has historically been irrelevant when a police officer is on trial, with law enforcement often accorded the benefit of the doubt and acquitted.

Are you living your values? Use the ‘Bull’s-Eye’ exercise to check these 4 areas of your life

One exercise that I have found useful and have often shared for getting clarity around what is really important in life is the “Bull’s-Eye” values-clarification exercise, designed by Swedish psychotherapist Tobias Lundgren.

This New York attorney uses TikTok to shed light on lawyer life

Unhappy young lawyers often share a common lament: “If only I’d known what being a lawyer was really like.” It’s easy to understand the disconnect. After all, TV shows, movies and the media focus primarily on the endgame—the trial, the closing, the conviction. There’s rarely much about the day-to-day legal work leading up to that big moment—assuming there is one at all. Cecillia X. Xie is out to change that.

Bigoted attacks must be met with stronger protections

For a variety of reasons, including voluntary reporting and a lack of police training or acknowledgment of bias incidents, tracking hate crimes is challenging and imperfect.

Working remotely for the first time? Here are lessons from a lawyer who’s done it for 13 years

“The pandemic has done what I never thought possible, validating what I have known for some time: When one works from home, one is actually working. Despite the industry’s negative projections during the early stages of COVID-19, our firm had a profitable year with all of us working from home,” writes Tracey Mihelic, senior counsel at Husch Blackwell.

This voting rights advocate and ‘Jeopardy!’ champ is ready with the right answers

In addition to appearing on Jeopardy! last year, Zach Newkirk was involved with a lawsuit against then-President Donald Trump on behalf of those injured during the 2020 Black Lives Matter protests in Lafayette Square.

Depleting reserves can lead to burnout

Law practice should not require you to sacrifice your health—the most obvious reason for that being that your well-being is the cornerstone of being a good lawyer.

Biden has an opportunity to reform and diversify federal courts

We have seen that courts can be an instrument for social and political change; they can be the sword and the shield. But they best serve justice when they are inclusive—a perennial challenge for the federal judiciary.

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