ABA Journal

Inter Alia

50 ABA Journal Inter Alia articles.

What Netflix’s ‘Tiger King’ says about gun culture in America

With Tiger King, Netflix promises “murder, mayhem and madness,” and the seven-part series delivers. “Video games, the news and Hollywood have inured the public to the idea of violence while camouflaging the grisly consequences,” writes the ABA Journal’s Liane Jackson.

Talk of reparations is being revived around the country

From neurodiversity awareness to autism activism, this disability justice advocate fights for the rights of the marginalized

Autistic, Asian, nonbinary. Advocate, activist, organizer. Writer, speaker, educator, lawyer. Lydia X.Z. Brown is all of those things but also this: a force of nature. We asked Brown 10 questions.

BigLaw partner says lawyers have an obligation to give back to their communities

“Too many lawyers have forgotten their humanity. We have become so consumed with billing hours and rainmaking that we have forgotten the simple joy we felt when we used to shake cans on the quads of our universities for local charities,” writes Lindsey D.G. Dates, a partner in Barnes & Thornburg’s Chicago office and a member of the firm’s litigation department.

How to advance mindfulness in the workplace

The benefits of mindfulness and meditation are well-documented and studied: They reduce stress and anxiety, improve attention and memory, and promote self-regulation and empathy, writes lawyer and author Jeena Cho.

Lawyer fights for human rights in the nation of Georgia

“Being a female lawyer in Georgia is a constant struggle against stereotypes. Many people brag about our cultural traditions for respecting women in my country, but in reality, these traditions are used to marginalize women from community decision-making,” writes Anna Arganashvili, a human rights lawyer.

Behind bars in Scandinavia, and what we can learn

“We help each other—that’s what we do here is we help each other.” It wasn’t the sentiment I expected to hear from a guard describing his interaction with inmates at the high-security prison outside Stockholm.

Choice and Fate: Why I’m glad my first job offer was rescinded

When I finally had the opportunity to encounter the solo practitioner who rescinded my job offer, he approached me first, stating something like: “I am glad to see that you landed with Plunkett Cooney, it’s a really good firm. I withdrew the offer because you deserved a job like this and needed to wait for it to come along.”

When caring costs you: Lawyers can experience vicarious trauma from work

This Alaska lawyer blends life and law as a tribal court judge and an Orthodox Jew

How does a Jewish kid from Philly become a tribal court judge in Alaska? Just ask Judge David Avraham Voluck.

Inclusion illusion: Diversity’s pain point

Instead of feeling like valued employees, women and lawyers of color often feel like “diversity props” or window dressing—tokens of diversity but without the inclusion.

Adults need screen-time limits too

While there is no easy answer for how to live mindfully in the hyperconnected digital world, there are some practices we can incorporate into our lives to create a healthier relationship with digital technology.

Surmounting hidden disabilities: Challenges need not be barriers

During law school, Emily Cox struggled with countless seizures, numerous medication changes, and having her license to drive rescinded. But she was fortunate to be in a school that cared about her disability with an administration that made sure she had the resources she needed to succeed.

A prosecutors’ leadership retreat in Berlin offers a stark reminder to remain vigilant

On a personal level, it was difficult to travel to a country responsible for the atrocities of the Holocaust and face ghosts of the past. But it was also heartening to see how Germany has reckoned with its shameful history. And there is much we can learn from that, writes Miriam Aroni Krinsky, who spent 15 years as a federal prosecutor and is the executive director of Fair and Just Prosecution.

This Tennessee attorney is having a ball owning a baseball team

Rob Frost, who practices with the Knoxville, Tennessee, firm Arnett, Draper & Hagood, is part owner of the Forest City Owls of Forest City, North Carolina, one of the 16 baseball teams that make up the Coastal Plain League, a collegiate summer league.

Read more ...