International Law

2753 ABA Journal International Law articles.

Remain-in-Mexico policy for asylum-seekers will be reviewed by Supreme Court
The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday agreed to review a Trump administration policy that requires asylum-seekers at the southern border to remain in Mexico while their cases are pending.
National security lawyers say Russia is ramping up attacks on the American judiciary—and meeting resistance

“I think their clearest objective is to convince people that our institutions, including our justice system, are irrevocably broken,” says Suzanne Spaulding, senior adviser for homeland security and director of the Defending Democratic Institutions project at the Center for Strategic and International Studies.

Afternoon Briefs: Self-driving car crash leads to charge; ABA center will monitor trial of ‘Hotel Rwanda’ hero

Backup driver for self-driving car is charged after crash death

A backup driver for an Uber self-driving test vehicle has been charged with negligent homicide for a March 2018 crash…

Lawyer accused of obtaining fraudulent environmental verdict against Chevron is disbarred
Rejecting a referee’s recommendation, a New York appeals court has disbarred an environmental lawyer for obtaining a fraudulent $8.6 billion judgment against Chevron in Ecuador.
Can plaintiffs from other countries hold China legally accountable for the coronavirus pandemic in their respective courts?
Would a government-backed social credit scoring system like China’s ever fly in the US?
Indian scholar’s release from detention shows importance of international human rights work

As a member of the ABA Center for Human Rights team, Waris Husain has the privilege of helping those on the front line of justice across Asia. One recent case highlights CHR’s ability to take immediate action to assist a justice defender in danger.

Harvard, MIT sue to stop new rule prohibiting visas for international students taking online courses
Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology on Wednesday brought a federal lawsuit challenging a COVID-19-related immigration rule, which prohibits visas for international students taking online courses.
In advancing dignity rights, the ABA has a unique potential to change the world

“While lawyers do indispensable work throughout the human rights community, as I hoped to do, it is something else again for the entire legal profession, as represented by the ABA, to advocate human rights. That was power.”

ABA is ‘deeply concerned’ by China’s new security law, saying it violates agreement with Hong Kong
ABA President Judy Perry Martinez said Wednesday the ABA is “deeply concerned” by China’s new national security legislation, which is designed to curb anti-government demonstrations in Hong Kong.
Coronavirus on board: Lawyer’s parents were trapped on a contaminated cruise ship

Florida plaintiffs lawyer Debi F. Chalik remembers the moment she decided to file suit against Princess Cruises for negligence arising from the COVID-19 outbreak on the Grand Princess ship. It was March 6, and she was home watching Vice President Mike Pence deliver a televised briefing that included an update on the status of the Grand Princess.

Suing a cruise line? There are a boatload of challenges unique to the industry

Bringing a case against an ocean cruise line is challenging. Plaintiffs lawyers say these cases are highly specific and highly specialized, governed by myriad legal standards and subject to investigative challenges. It’s an area so unique that it’s easy for a novice lawyer to make an honest mistake that can permanently sink an otherwise meritorious case.

How are the ABA’s international ROLI programs adjusting to a global pandemic?

Communities around the world are reeling from the repercussions of the novel coronavirus pandemic and measures taken to contain it. Democratic backsliding threatens to derail significant development gains we have…

Chemerinsky: It’s going to be an unusual May in the Supreme Court
For the first time in recent memory, the Supreme Court will be holding oral arguments in May, and for the first time ever, they will be by telephone. Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, oral arguments were canceled in the Supreme Court in March and April.
Are we entering a new era of legal education during the novel coronavirus crisis?
Ari Kaplan recently spoke with Lutz-Christian Wolff, Stephen Gallagher and Joyce Wong—the dean, associate dean for teaching and learning and the faculty secretary, respectively—of the Chinese University of Hong Kong's law faculty, about the COVID-19 pandemic and a potentially new era of legal education.

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