International Law

2755 ABA Journal International Law articles.

Chemerinsky: It’s going to be an unusual May in the Supreme Court
For the first time in recent memory, the Supreme Court will be holding oral arguments in May, and for the first time ever, they will be by telephone. Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, oral arguments were canceled in the Supreme Court in March and April.
Are we entering a new era of legal education during the novel coronavirus crisis?
Ari Kaplan recently spoke with Lutz-Christian Wolff, Stephen Gallagher and Joyce Wong—the dean, associate dean for teaching and learning and the faculty secretary, respectively—of the Chinese University of Hong Kong's law faculty, about the COVID-19 pandemic and a potentially new era of legal education.
Afternoon Briefs: Missouri sues China over COVID-19; lawyer accused of threatening cameraman

Missouri is first state to sue China over COVID-19

The state of Missouri has filed a lawsuit against China that contends that its government covered up knowledge of COVID-19 and…

Afternoon Briefs: Congress asked for COVID-19 lawsuit curbs; law school cuts pay for staff and faculty

Lobbyists seek COVID-19 lawsuit curbs

Lobbying groups for U.S. businesses are asking Congress to curb liability for companies that could face lawsuits in connection with COVID-19. The U.S. Chamber of…

Now more than ever, human rights defenders must be released from detention

In the interest of flattening the COVID-19 curve, upholding the fundamental rights of detainees and enhancing national security, human rights defenders arbitrarily detained for their legitimate rights work should be…

Lawyer fights for human rights in the nation of Georgia

“Being a female lawyer in Georgia is a constant struggle against stereotypes. Many people brag about our cultural traditions for respecting women in my country, but in reality, these traditions are used to marginalize women from community decision-making,” writes Anna Arganashvili, a human rights lawyer.

Afternoon Briefs: GCs are overloaded with coronavirus webinars; former judge dies at 88

General counsels are overloaded with COVID-19 emails and webinar invites

Corporate clients are inundated with emails and webinar invitations from law firms offering information on the novel coronavirus, according to…

Chief innovation officer talks firm’s changing culture amid COVID-19 and best tips for working remotely
Ari Kaplan recently spoke with Patrick DiDomenico, the chief innovation officer for Jackson Lewis, a large national labor and employment-focused law firm with more than 60 offices throughout the United States. He is also the author of Knowledge Management for Lawyers, published by the American Bar Association in 2016.
Federal judge orders mental health review of Guantanamo Bay prisoner
A federal judge has ordered a panel of American and foreign doctors to evaluate the mental health of a prisoner at Guantánamo Bay, the first time such a mixed medical commission has been used.
9th Circuit blocks two policies that restrict and discourage asylum applications
A federal appeals court on Friday blocked two Trump administration policies that affect asylum-seekers.
Chinese dissident can sue law firm over hack that exposed information online, judge rules
A federal judge in Washington, D.C., has ruled that a Chinese asylum-seeker can sue the Clark Hill law firm over a 2017 hack that allegedly exposed personal data online.
TrialWatch volunteers are helping secure human rights around the globe

TrialWatch is a global initiative established by the Clooney Foundation for Justice that monitors trials in which there appears to be a risk of fair trial violations.

Afternoon Briefs: Censure recommended for judge’s ‘knucklehead’ remarks; Kesha loses round in Dr. Luke suit

Censure recommended for judge’s remarks on racy photos

The New Jersey Supreme Court’s Advisory Committee on Judicial Conduct is recommending censure for a judge who commented on a “knucklehead”…

Behind bars in Scandinavia, and what we can learn

“We help each other—that’s what we do here is we help each other.” It wasn’t the sentiment I expected to hear from a guard describing his interaction with inmates at the high-security prison outside Stockholm.

Afternoon Briefs: Texas no longer accepting refugees; new San Francisco DA announces round of layoffs

New refugees no longer welcome in Texas, governor says

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott announced in a letter released Friday that the state will not take new refugees under a federal…

Read more ...