Juries

879 ABA Journal Juries articles.

Afternoon Briefs: Another state plans remote bar exam in July; Texas AG sues electric company over huge bills

So far, 9 jurisdictions have plan for remote bar exam in July

California’s July 2021 bar exam will be remote, the California Supreme Court announced Friday. The first testing day,…

California nonprofit pushes states to make jury instructions more broadly available

Since his early days as a lawyer, Wisconsin criminal defense attorney Chad Lanning has been troubled that the state’s jury instructions were not freely available to the legal community or the general public. As Lanning rose to leadership in the Wisconsin Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers, he turned to Public.Resource.Org’s Carl Malamud for assistance in raising concerns about the issue.

As some jury trials resume, juror shortages create problems; one court sees a 5% yield on summonses
As jury trials resume in several states and continue in others, finding jurors willing to show up is a problem.
How will the ‘Anthony Fauci effect’ influence jurors?
Lawyers and jury consultants are considering whether the COVID-19 pandemic will influence juror attitudes in what Law.com is dubbing the “Anthony Fauci effect.”
Judges differ on when it’s safe to hold in-person jury trials

Despite reports from federal courts of in-person jury trials being held safely, many judges across the country are still deliberating whether to hold in-person jury trials at all.

Criminal defense lawyer challenges jury trial moratorium, argues cases can’t be paused indefinitely
A criminal defense lawyer has filed a speedy trial demand that challenges a federal court’s order suspending all jury trials until March 12.
Study examines decline in civil and criminal jury trials and how to bring them back
While judges and lawyers view jury trials as slower, less predictable and less cost-effective than other forms of case resolution, they also view them as fair and prefer them over alternatives, according to a national study released in December by the ABA Commission on the American Jury.
State supreme court calls prosecutor’s courthouse campaigning an ‘exploitation of the judicial system’
The Arkansas Supreme Court overturned a man's murder conviction Thursday after finding that the prosecutor improperly campaigned in the courthouse during the trial.
Judge accused of failing to follow COVID-19 recommendations is removed from 2 trials
An Ohio judge has been removed from two upcoming criminal trials after a lawyer for the defendants alleged that the judge was failing to implement COVID-19 precautions.
Federal inmate is executed after Supreme Court denies stay; dissent points to hidden evidence

Federal prisoner Brandon Bernard was executed in Indiana on Thursday after the U.S. Supreme Court refused to stay his execution. Bernard apologized for his role in the deaths of two youth ministers in Texas in 1999. He was 18 at the time of the crime.

Afternoon Briefs: Peremptory challenge curbs allowed; more federal courts halt jury trials

Juror shortages lead to curbs on peremptory challenges

Judges in Lackawanna County, Pennsylvania, are allowed to ban or reduce peremptory challenges in civil cases to avoid running out of potential…

Resignation of judge who called juror ‘Aunt Jemima’ is ‘binding and irrevocable,’ judicial court says
The Pennsylvania Court of Judicial Discipline has said a judge who referred to a juror as “Aunt Jemima” can’t change his mind about resigning.
Federal inmate tried by all-white jury is executed after Supreme Court lifts execution stay
Federal death-row inmate Orlando Hall was executed Thursday after the U.S. Supreme Court lifted an execution stay issued by a federal judge who said the government needed a prescription for the execution drug.
Afternoon Briefs: Several states pause jury trials; suit accuses Texas AG of whistleblower retaliation

Several states stop jury trials

A surge in COVID-19 cases has led several states to suspend jury trials. They include New York, Maryland, Texas, New Mexico and Wyoming. (The

Should juries be feared or revered? Retired lawyer examines their roles
The jury system first scared me at the age of 9. How, you ask? I grew up in Montreal, the son of parents who immigrated from Belgium. My late father was a humble tailor who worked in a factory. One day, we received a letter in the mail. It had an impressive-looking logo of a crown and the scales of justice.

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