ABA Journal

Juries

928 ABA Journal Juries articles.

Some trials by SEC administrative judges violate Seventh Amendment right to jury trial, 5th Circuit rules

A federal appeals court ruled Wednesday that administrative trials by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission violate the Seventh Amendment right to a jury trial when civil penalties are sought.

EmotionTrac analyzes facial expressions in real time to help lawyers pick juries, market themselves

Facial recognition software is becoming a greater part of our everyday lives. But the technology is controversial and not without its critics. Questions about its accuracy—especially relating to recognizing minority faces—remain.

The Defamation Trial of Johnny Depp: When thespians testify, who can you believe?

My main office has three large conference rooms. They are outfitted with presentable marble tables and large, comfortable black chairs, and they are adorned with images of the Oklahoma City skyline. More important, though, they have TVs.

Execution stayed for Texas woman who confessed in toddler’s death after 100 denials

The top criminal court in Texas has stayed the execution of Melissa Elizabeth Lucio, who confessed to the murder of her 2-year-old daughter after repeated denials during an hourslong interrogation.

Weekly Briefs: Prof gets $400K settlement in pronoun case; panic-attack firing leads to $450K verdict

Prof who refused to use preferred pronouns gets $400K settlement

Shawnee State University in Ohio has agreed to pay philosophy professor Nicholas Meriwether $400,000 and to rescind a written warning…

Cross-section: Pandemic-era challenges spur civil litigators to shift approach to representative juries

The coronavirus pandemic’s strain on the jury system is clear to civil trial lawyers. Some are even tailoring their trial strategies to account for how the threat of disease could be changing jurors’ attitudes toward serving and cutting into the pool of available jurors in ways that could sway their cases.

Kentucky clerk who denied marriage licenses to same-sex couples can’t avoid liability for civil rights violations, judge rules

A federal judge in Kentucky has ruled that a former Rowan County, Kentucky, clerk who denied marriage licenses to same-sex couples cannot duck liability for violating their civil rights. But the court left it up to a jury to decide whether she should pay damages.

May jurors see 3D defense reenactment of alleged crime? Judge appears reluctant to allow it

A Florida judge on Friday appeared reluctant to allow jurors to wear virtual reality goggles that illustrate the findings of an expert witness for the defense in an attempted murder case.

Lawyer accused of shooting arrows, gun at ex-girlfriend’s law office loses civil appeal

A disbarred California lawyer accused of shooting a crossbow and gun into his ex-girlfriend’s law office building has failed to overturn a $2.2 million judgment against him.

Convicted Boston Marathon bomber got a fair trial, Supreme Court rules in reinstating his capital sentence

The U.S. Supreme Court on Friday reinstated the death penalty for Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, convicted in the 2013 Boston Marathon bombing that killed three people, wounded 260 others and led to the fatal shooting of a police officer.

Sarah Palin didn’t meet ‘high standard’ for proving defamation in suit against New York Times, judge says

Updated: A federal judge in New York told lawyers on Monday that he will dismiss a defamation lawsuit filed against the New York Times by former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin.

Lawyer Michael Avenatti is convicted of stealing money from Stormy Daniels

Jurors in Manhattan, New York City, convicted lawyer Michael Avenatti on Friday for diverting to himself nearly $300,000 in book-deal payments intended for his client, adult film actress Stormy Daniels.

Can the true-crime genre help attorneys with their jury trials?

It’s good to be back. After my usual holiday break, I now find myself staring straight into the eyes of my fifth full year writing this column for the ABA Journal. It has been a privilege and an honor to have such a far-reaching platform for my thoughts on law and pop culture, and I look forward to continuing the content.

As omicron COVID-19 cases surge, several courts pause jury trials

A California federal court said Wednesday it would suspend in-person jury trials following similar announcements by other state and federal courts amid the surge in omicron COVID-19 cases.

Defense attorney convicted in $1M federal money laundering case

A Baltimore defense attorney, who allegedly helped a longtime client and convicted drug trafficker funnel money through his law firm, has been found guilty of conspiracy to commit money laundering.

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