ABA Journal

Juries

902 ABA Journal Juries articles.

Texas clerk’s ‘idiosyncratic system’ of choosing jury panels could lead to thousands of overturned verdicts

A district clerk in Brazoria County, Texas, divided up potential jurors by region and race to assemble jury venires, an “idiosyncratic system” that could potentially lead to thousands of over overturned verdicts.

As more courts use facility dogs, some defense lawyers object

In a justice system that can sometimes appear hostile, facility dogs can comfort child witnesses as they talk about the most traumatic experiences of their lives. Because the dogs lie at children’s feet in the witness box, jurors may never see them. But according to some defense lawyers, when judges say witnesses will be assisted by canines, that makes them appear more sympathetic or believable, violating the due process rights of their clients.

Weekly Briefs: Texas abortion clinics return to SCOTUS; law prof known for critical race theory work wins award

Texas abortion clinics seek SCOTUS review

Abortion providers in Texas asked the U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday to consider whether their lawsuit challenging the state’s restrictive law can go forward.…

Arizona eliminates peremptory challenges in jury selection

There will soon be a big change for jury selection in Arizona. The Arizona Supreme Court published a rule modification Friday ending the use of peremptory challenges in civil and criminal cases. It will be implemented Jan. 1.

Ineffective counsel at two levels entitles death row inmate to new sentencing, 4th Circuit says

A federal appeals court has ruled that a death row inmate in South Carolina is entitled to a new sentencing hearing because of failures by his trial counsel and appellate counsel.

Top Massachusetts court rules potential jurors can’t be removed based on sexual orientation

Lawyers can’t exclude potential jurors during voir dire based on sexual orientation, the top court in Massachusetts ruled on Monday.

The Chauvin conviction shows why diverse juries matter

When it comes to convicting police officers, clear and convincing evidence is only half the battle. But evidence—visual, circumstantial, forensic—has historically been irrelevant when a police officer is on trial, with law enforcement often accorded the benefit of the doubt and acquitted.

Unvaccinated lawyer has to wear mask at client’s trial after top state court refuses to intervene

A criminal defense lawyer in Augusta, Maine, has to wear a mask in his client’s jury trial this week after the state’s top court refused to consider his claim that the face covering would prejudice jurors.

Afternoon Briefs: Internet research is costly for juror; bar dues claim partly resurrected

Federal juror’s internet research cost over $11K

A federal judge in New Jersey has held a juror in contempt and fined him more than $11,000 for conducting internet research on…

Afternoon Briefs: Crowell merger announced; judge reverses himself on juror vaccinations

Crowell & Moring will merge with IP firm

Crowell & Moring is merging with Chicago-based Brinks Gilson & Lione, a 61-lawyer intellectual property law firm. Crowell will have more than…

ABA brief backs ‘individualized content questioning’ of possible jurors in high-publicity cases

Possible jurors in high-profile cases should be individually questioned to determine what they have read and heard about a case and how it affected their attitudes, the ABA says in an amicus brief filed Monday.

DOJ seeks reinstatement of death penalty for Boston Marathon bomber

The U.S. Department of Justice is backing reinstatement of the death sentence for the Boston Marathon bomber in a brief filed Monday with the U.S. Supreme Court.

Jurors are told former law firm partner created sham creditor to help client shield assets

Did a former Freeborn & Peters partner create a sham creditor to help his client shield assets in a bankruptcy? Or did he engage in a legitimate legal strategy to try to save a struggling business and help out a neighbor?

Serving as a juror was an unexpected duty during my year as ABA president

“‘All rise for the jury’ is something I have heard scores of times as a trial lawyer. But this time, and for the first time, I heard them as a part of a jury,” writes ABA President Patricia Lee Refo.

Divided federal appeals court affirms ruling against former state justice regarding juror’s Twitter use

An en banc federal appeals court split 6-6 Thursday in an appeal by a former West Virginia Supreme Court justice who was seeking a hearing on a juror’s Twitter use during his fraud trial.

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