Lawyer Wellness

906 ABA Journal Lawyer Wellness articles.

Lawyer recounts the life and legacy of the mysterious man behind Pilates
In 1963, John Howard Steel was a 28-year-old attorney with a challenging litigation practice, an unhappy marriage and a stiff neck. At the urging of his mother, Steel decided to try physical therapy at a gym owned by an elderly German immigrant named Joseph Pilates. It was a decision that would change Steel's life.
8 tips for lawyers on how to build resilience
A popular keyword for psychologists and transformational leaders these days is “resilience.” The dictionary definition of resilience is the ability to recover. Synonyms are “perseverance,” “elasticity,” “toughness,” “flexibility” and “durability.”
Is the law making you fat?  A lawyer and life coach shares her story
Law school taught me many things, but one that stands out for me is this: Chocolate cake reduces stress.
The psychological obstacles to achieving diversity in the legal profession
Last year, I wrote that the legal profession’s failure to retain women and minorities was not a “hard problem,” but rather a character flaw. My intent was not to imply malice; many partners at law firms genuinely want their diversity numbers to improve. Still, facts are facts.
3 strategies to reframe your negative mindset

While the negativity bias may be useful in helping lawyers spot potential pitfalls in their clients’ cases, it can also impact lawyer well-being. The good news is that there are many practices for combating the negativity bias and increasing happiness and resilience.

6 strategies to get a perfectionistic lawyer off the ledge

In one of life’s ironies, the very things that make a great lawyer may also make a lawyer miserable. Achievement equaled value; if we did not get more than 100 on a test, we failed. This is the lawyer’s curse of perfectionism, writes James Gray Robinson.

Lawyer who allegedly lied about health for deadline extensions should be suspended, hearing board says
An Illinois lawyer, who reportedly lied and said he had cancer—when he did not—and instead was looking for discovery deadline extensions, is facing potential suspension from the practice of law. He also allegedly lied about having cancer on his University of Chicago Law School application.
Surveyed midlevel associates discuss snacks, decor, boring work and burnout
Midlevel associates waxed philosophical, critiqued office food and decor, and discussed burnout in verbatim comments collected in an American Lawyer survey.
State bar takes ‘medieval approach to mental health,’ says Trump-appointed judge
A federal judge has chastised the Kentucky “Bar Bureaucracy” for its treatment of a bar applicant diagnosed with bipolar disorder, even as he tossed her lawsuit alleging violations of disability law and the equal protection clause.
These law firms ranked highest for midlevel associate satisfaction; transparency ratings increase
O’Melveny & Myers is ranked No. 1 for satisfaction by midlevel associates responding to a survey by the American Lawyer.
Commission learns of ‘heartbreaking’ diagnosis after investigating reports of judge’s erratic behavior
A New York judge has agreed to retire after a commission investigating reports of her erratic behavior learned that she has been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease.
Netflix’s new Jeffrey Epstein docuseries explores conspiracy theories and crime cover-ups

Oklahoma lawyer Adam Banner breaks down Jeffrey Epstein: Filthy Rich and various conspiracy theories surrounding the accusations against Epstein and his death. Banner also shares personal experiences in which he has dealt with client suicide.

10 steps to identify irrational resistance to self-care
Do you include acts of self-care on your calendar reminders or to-do lists? Probably not.
4 lessons we can learn as a profession from the pandemic

What are some lessons of this COVID-19 experience for the legal profession? What are some truths that are coming to light? Four initial lessons come to mind for lawyer and author Heidi K. Brown.

COVID-19 hasn’t stopped this lawyer from advocating for wellness and recovery
It may often seem like most, if not all, of your contacts on social media are complaining about wearing face masks, having to social distance and adhere to shelter-in-place orders. Since the novel coronavirus hit, performing these tasks have become part of our daily lives. But it's important to note that you only have control of yourself, says lawyer and author Brian Cuban.

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