ABA Journal

Lawyer Wellness

972 ABA Journal Lawyer Wellness articles.

Can lawyers who are natural pessimists learn to channel optimism? Speaker at well-being conference says it’s time to try

When handling legal matters, lawyers often have to envision the worst possible outcomes for their clients and work to protect against them.

Darryl Wilson shares love of cooking with others during COVID-19 pandemic

Darryl Wilson, an in-house attorney at Tyson Foods in Springdale, Arkansas, has used cooking as a form of therapy during the COVID-19 pandemic. He launched his own Instagram account, where he regularly posts photos of his dishes, and taught two virtual cooking classes to members of the ABA Young Lawyers Division. “We always have to find things that make us happy and that are fulfilling or rewarding to us,” he says. “Mine just happens to be cooking.”

Law firms came ‘dangerously close’ to losing almost a quarter of their associates in 2021, new report says

Law firms “are spending huge amounts of money and putting their profits at increasing risk” as they battle to hold on to their associates, according to a report released Tuesday.

How I learned to find work-life balance during the COVID-19 pandemic

“I dread what returning to normal would mean for my work/life: less sleep, less exercise, fewer hobbies and more stress. What lies ahead for me is a tangled knot of issues.”

Institute for Well-Being in Law will host first virtual conference later this month

A nonprofit formed to further the work of the National Task Force on Lawyer Well-Being that the American Bar Association participated in will host its inaugural conference later this month.

Meet 12 ABA members who inspired us in 2021

The ABA Journal regularly profiles exceptional ABA members in its Members Who Inspire series. In the past year, we featured many in the legal field who are encouraging and energizing others with their good work, including advocating for inmates on death row, mentoring prospective law students of African descent and fighting to stop bullying in the workplace.

6 ways to fight workplace bullying in legal spaces

Check out these tips from David Yamada, a labor & employment expert and the subject of our Members Who Inspire column in our Dec. 2021-Jan. 2022 issue.

Self-love for lawyers around the holidays

The holidays are upon us, and one of the first questions any stressed out, anxious or close to burnt-out lawyers should be asking themselves is “How do I feel about…

David Yamada is fighting to end workplace bullying

“We’re taught to be really good at manipulating language as lawyers, and language is the stock-in-trade of bullying and abuse,” Prof. David Yamada says. “Most of the time, it’s not about physical aggression. It’s about commissions and omissions, I guess you could say, in terms of how people treat one another.”

30% of these lawyers would like to work fewer hours; those most dissatisfied are younger and female

Thirty percent of surveyed “standout lawyers” would like to work fewer hours, while 53% are satisfied with the hours that they are working.

Cap billable hours for lawyer well-being, state bar report says; survey found this group is least satisfied

Law firms should promote lawyer well-being by capping billable hours, encouraging full vacations and managing client expectations, according to a report released Monday by the New York State Bar Association Task Force on Attorney Well-Being.

5 tips for working with clients who stand in their own way

Recently, I had an immigration case, where my client was tardy on every deadline and patently refused to do anything beyond the bare minimum to aid their cause. I was emotionally drained by the case but buoyed by the positive result at the end. I must admit I couldn’t fight the impulse to remind the client that they had stood in the way of their own success.

Has COVID-19 made the workplace more accessible for lawyers with disabilities?

Since March 2020, most law firms and legal organizations have adapted to the COVID-19 pandemic by allowing their employees to work remotely and transition to more flexible hours. For some lawyers with disabilities, teleworking has brought significant benefits, including increased access to their clients and colleagues and to more job opportunities.

From the depths of addiction to helping attorneys overcome their own, lawyer and author Brian Cuban has made his mark

In 2006, the Dallas Mavericks were in the NBA finals. The team’s owner, Mark Cuban, gave two tickets for the opening game to his brother Brian to give to friends. But the younger sibling had other plans: He traded them to his drug dealer for $1,000 worth of cocaine.

20% of surveyed corporate lawyers were highly exhausted, and most in that group wanted to switch jobs

Among the highly exhausted group, 41% showed signs of psychological distress; 68% were looking to leave their organization; and 61% frequently delayed, scoped down or killed projects in which they were involved.

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